Get notified when we add a new ACACE Manual
Summary of Content
Page 74 ign-LF Page 100 1. Remove the outer jacket (1). Use care not to cut into the drain wire of the mylar tape. 2. Unwrap the tape. Do not remove the tape. Use the tape in order to rewrap the twisted conductors after the splice is made. 3. Prepare the splice. Untwist the conductors and follow the splicing instructions for copper wire. Staggering the splices by 65 mm is recommended. 4. Re-assemble the cable. - Rewrap the conductors with the mylar tape. Component Locations Cruise Control Module: Component Locations Cruise Control Module At the left rear of the engine compartment, on the cowl. Page 70 CEMF-DE Page 88 Important: After front probing any connector, check for terminal damage. If terminal damage is suspected, check for proper terminal contact. When front probing connectors use a mating terminal adapter from the J 35616-A Connector Test Adapter Kit. Using the proper adapters ensures that proper terminal contact integrity is maintained. Frontprobe connector terminals only when specifically required in diagnostic procedures. Because front probing can be a source of damage to connector terminals. Use extra care in order to avoid deforming the terminal, either by forcing the test probe too far into the cavity or by using too large of a test probe. Backprobe Important: Do not backprobe a sealed connector. - After backprobing any connector, check for terminal damage. If terminal damage is suspected, check for proper terminal contact. Symptom Diagnostic Example The following is an example of a symptom and the correct course of action taken by the technician. Important: Research for possible bulletins, DTCs and the vehicle's service history. Also, thoroughly screen the customer regarding the problem in order to complete the repair of the vehicle and completely satisfy the customer when a DTC or a symptom diagnosis is not available. Verify the Customer Concern, Check the Problem Customer complaint is the headlamps are inoperative. Verify the normal operating procedure of the circuit and the components that share that circuit. Refer to Strategy Based Diagnosis. Review the Headlamps Electrical Schematic (Preliminary Checks) Review the schematic, it is essential to understand how a circuit should work before trying to figure out why it doesn't. After understanding how a circuit should operate, read the schematic again, this time keeping in mind what has been learned by operating the circuit. Since both the low beam headlamps are inoperative, ensure that the following components are operating properly. - The headlamp Switch. - The YEL wire. - Low contacts of the Headlamp Dimmer Switch - C100 terminal 1E. - The TAN wires. - Grounds G105 and G109. Refer to Strategy Based Diagnosis. Perform the System Check The system check indicates that the low beam headlamps operate when the high beam switch is in high. Also, the high beam indicator illuminates but neither high beam headlamp operates. Check for Bulletins Utilizing a combination of Techline tools and the information accumulated from the Preliminary Checks, check for bulletins. Isolate the Root Cause At this point analyze and (diagnose the problem), and develop text. Since the high beam indicator illuminated when the headlamp dimmer switch was in the high position, the high contacts of the headlamp dimmer switch and the LT GRN wire between the headlamp dimmer switch and C100 are good. At this point, it is extremely unlikely that the high beam filaments in the RH headlamp are both open or that both headlamp connections are bad. The cause must be a bad connection at C100 or an open in the LT GRN wire between C1OO and the RH headlamp. Page 48 Steps 12 - 16 Horns Inoperative How to Use Circuit Descriptions The circuit description describes how the system works electrically. It details how power, ground, inputs, and outputs are supplied to the system's related components. The circuit description also explains the communication and interaction of all components that affect the operation of the system. Battery positive voltage is applied at all times to the horn relay terminals 85 and 30. Pressing the horn switch grounds the horn relay coil on CKT 28 (BLK). The relay coil can also be grounded on CKT 28 (BLK) by the Dash Integration Module (DIM). The horn relay applies battery positive voltage to the horns on CKT 29 (DK GRN) when energized. The horns sound until the horn switch is released or the DIM signal is gone. Page 66 Part 18 Of 20 Diagram Information and Instructions Daytime Running Lamp Relay: Diagram Information and Instructions How to Use Electrical Schematics Important: The schematic does not represent the components and wiring as they physically appear on the vehicle. For example, a 4-foot length of wire is treated no differently in a schematic from one which is only a few inches long. When diagnosing a horn problem use the service information located in the Horns (cell 40) service category. The following schematic is a typical example of a schematic with its supporting text. The wiring schematic is the cornerstone of electrical diagnosis. Schematics break the entire electrical system into individual circuits, showing the electrical current paths when a circuit is operating properly. Wiring which is not part of the circuit of interest is referenced to another page where the circuit is shown complete. Schematics use a top (power) to bottom (ground) sequence to present electrical information. How to Use Component Location Views Component location views are line illustrations that indicate all of the vehicle's electrical components within each electrical system. Page 62 Part 14 Of 20 Page 23 Cruise Control Module: Service and Repair Removal Procedure CAUTION: Refer to Battery Disconnect Caution in Service Precautions. 1. Disconnect the battery negative cable. 2. Disconnect the cruise control cable. 3. Disconnect the electrical connectors, as necessary. 4. Remove the fasteners that retain the cruise control module to the cowl panel. 5. Remove the cruise control module from the vehicle. Installation Procedure 1. Install the cruise control module to the vehicle. NOTE: Refer to Fastener Note in Service Precautions. 2. Install the fasteners that retain the cruise control module to the cowl panel. Tighten Tighten the screws to 4.5 N.m (40 lb in). 3. Connect the electrical connectors, as necessary. 4. Install the cruise control cable. 5. Connect the battery negative cable. 6. Test the systems operation. Page 119 Steps 12 - 16 Horns Inoperative How to Use Circuit Descriptions The circuit description describes how the system works electrically. It details how power, ground, inputs, and outputs are supplied to the system's related components. The circuit description also explains the communication and interaction of all components that affect the operation of the system. Battery positive voltage is applied at all times to the horn relay terminals 85 and 30. Pressing the horn switch grounds the horn relay coil on CKT 28 (BLK). The relay coil can also be grounded on CKT 28 (BLK) by the Dash Integration Module (DIM). The horn relay applies battery positive voltage to the horns on CKT 29 (DK GRN) when energized. The horns sound until the horn switch is released or the DIM signal is gone. Page 28 Blower Motor Relay: Diagrams Blower Motor Relay Connector / WITHOUT A/C Blower Motor Relay / WITH A/C Locations Blower Motor Relay: Locations Center rear of the engine compartment, on the plenum front panel. Body Wiring to Blower Motor and Resistor Without A/C Page 86 - Pull to seat terminals - Weatherpack TM terminals Some terminals do not require all of the steps shown. Skip the steps that do not apply for your immediate terminal repair. The J 38125-B Terminal Repair Kit contains further information. 1. Cut OFF the terminal between the core and the insulation crimp. Minimize any wire loss. For weatherpack TM terminals, remove the seal. 2. Apply the correct seal per gauge size of wire For weatherpack TM terminals, slide the seal back along the wire in order to enable insulation removal. 3. Remove the insulation. 4. Align the seal with the end of the cable insulation (weatherpack TM terminals only). 5. Position the strip (and seal for weatherpack TM) in the terminal. For weatherpack TM terminals, position the strip and the seal in the terminal. 6. Hand crimp the core wings. 7. Hand crimp the insulation wings. For weatherpack TM terminals, hand crimp the insulation wings wire in seal and the cable. 8. Solder all of the hand crimp terminals. Micro-Pack 100 Terminal Repair NOTE: Use the Connector Test Adapter Kit J 35616-A for any test that requires probing the following items: - The PCM harness connectors - The electrical center fuse/relay cavities - The component terminals - The component harness connector Using this kit will prevent damage caused by the improper probing of connector terminals. Use care when probing connectors and replacing terminals. A short between opposite terminals may damage components. Use jumper wires between connectors when testing circuits. DO NOT probe through weatherpack TM seals. The J 35616 connector test adapter kit is the only recommended method of probing the following components: - Connectors - Terminals - Fuse blocks - Relay blocks The J 35616 connector test adapter kit contains an assortment of flexible connectors used in order to probe the components listed above. Open circuits may be difficult to locate visually because oxidation or terminal misalignment are hidden by the connectors. Wiggling a connector on a sensor or in the wiring harness may temporarily correct the open circuit. Intermittent problems may be caused by oxidized or loose connections. Verify the type of connector/terminal before performing any connector repair or terminal repair. Micro-Pack 100 Terminal Removal Page 94 The fuse is the most common method of an automotive wiring circuit protection. Whenever there is an excessive amount of current flowing through a circuit the fusible element will melt and create an open or incomplete circuit. Fuses are an one time protection device and must be replaced each time the circuit is overloaded. To determine if a fuse is open, remove the suspected fuse and examine the element in the fuse for an open (break). If not broken, also check for continuity using a J 39200DMM or a continuity tester. If the element is open or continuity is suspect, replace the fuse with one of equal current rating. Fuse Types Fuse Types Circuit Protection - Circuit Breakers A circuit breaker is a protective device that is designed to open the circuit when a current load is in excess of the rated breaker capacity. If there is a short or other type of overload condition in the circuit,the excessive current will open the circuit between the circuit breaker terminals. Two types of circuit breakers are used. Circuit Breaker: This type opens when excessive current passes through it for a period of time. It closes again after a few seconds, and if the cause of the high current is still present, it will open again. The circuit breaker will continue to cycle open and closed until the condition causing the high current is removed. Page 101 - Use caution not to wrap the drain wire in the tape (1). - Follow the splicing instructions for copper wire and splice the drain wire. - Wrap the drain wire around the conductors and tape with mylar tape. Important: Apply the mylar tape with the aluminum side inward. This ensures good electrical contact with the drain wire. 5. Tape over the entire cable. Use a winding motion when you apply the tape. Splicing Inline Harness Diodes Many vehicle electrical systems use a diode to isolate circuits and protect the components from voltage spikes. When installing a new diode use the following procedure. 1. Open the harness. - If the harness is taped, remove the tape. - To avoid wiring insulation damage, use a sewing ripper in order to cut open the harness. - If the harness has a black plastic conduit, pull out the diode. 2. If the diode is taped to the harness, remove all of the tape. 3. Check and record the current flow direction and orientation of diode. 4. Remove the inoperative diode from the harness with a suitable soldering tool Important: If the diode is located next to a connector terminal remove the terminal(s) from the connector to prevent damage from the soldering tool. 5. Carefully strip away a section of insulation next to the old soldered portion of the wire(s). Do not remove any more than is needed to attach the new diode. 6. Check current flow direction of the new diode, being sure to install the diode with correct bias. Reference the appropriate service manual wiring schematic to obtain the correct diode installation position. 7. Attach the new diode to the wire(s) using 60/40 rosin core solder. Before soldering attach some heat sinks (aluminum alligator clips) across the diode wire ends to protect the diode from excessive heat. Follow the manufacturer's instruction for the soldering equipment. 8. Reinstall terminal(s) into the connector Body if previously removed 9. Tape the diode to the harness or connector using electrical tape. Important: To prevent shorts to ground and water intrusion, completely cover all exposed wire and diode attachment points with tape. HO2S Wiring Repairs NOTE: Do not solder repairs under any circumstances as this could result in the air reference being obstructed. If the heated oxygen sensor pigtail wiring, connector,or terminal is damaged the entire oxygen sensor assembly must be replaced. Do not attempt to repair the wiring, connector, or terminals. In order for the sensor to function properly it must have a clean air reference. This clean air reference is obtained by way of the oxygen sensor signal and heater wires. Any attempt to repair the wires, connectors or terminals could result in the obstruction of the air reference and degrade oxygen sensor performance. The following guidelines should be used when servicing the heated Oxygen Sensor: - Do not apply contact cleaner or other materials to the sensor or vehicle harness connectors. These materials may get into the sensor, causing poor performance. Also, the sensor pigtail and harness wires must not be damaged in such a way that the wires inside are exposed. This could provide a path for foreign materials to enter the sensor and cause performance problems. - Neither the sensor nor vehicle lead wires should be bent sharply or kinked. Sharp bends, kinks, etc., could block the reference air path through the Page 54 Part 6 Of 20 Page 77 POS-ROM Page 37 Instrument Panel Control Module: Service and Repair Instrument Panel Module Replacement Removal Procedure 1. Remove the instrument panel. Refer to IP Assembly Replacement. 2. Remove the bolts (4) that retain supplemental restraint IP module to the instrument panel. 3. Remove the nuts (5) from the studs that retain the supplemental restraint IP module (2) to the instrument panel (3). 4. Remove the supplemental restraint IP module (2) from the instrument panel (3). Installation Procedure 1. Install the supplemental restraint IP module(2) to the instrument panel (3). NOTE: Refer to Fastener Note 2. Install the screws (4) that retain the supplemental restraint module to the instrument panel. Tighten: Tighten the fasteners to 8.0 N.m (7 lb in). 3. Install the nuts (5) to the studs (1) in order to retain the inflatable restraint IP module to the instrument panel. Tighten: Tighten the nuts to 8 N.m (71 lb in). 4. Install the instrument panel. Refer to IP Assembly Replacement. Page 96 - The wire must be of equal or greater size than the original (except fusible link). - The wire's insulation must have the same or higher temperature rating. Use general purpose insulation for areas that are not subject to high temperatures. - Use a cross-linked polyethylene insulated wire for areas where high temperatures are expected. Important: Use Cross-linked polyethylene wire to replace PVC, but do not replace cross-linked polyethylene with PVC. Cross-linked polyethylene wire is not fuel resistant. Do not use to replace wire where there is the possibility of fuel contact. 4. Strip the insulation. - Select the correct size opening in the wire stripper or work down from the largest size. - Strip approximately 7.5 mm (5116 inches) of insulation from each wire to be spliced. 5. Select the proper clip to secure the splice. Follow the instructions in the J 38125-B Terminal Repair Kit in order to determine the proper clip size crimp tool and anvil. 6. Overlap the two stripped wire ends and hold them between thumb and forefinger. 7. Center the splice clip (2) over the stripped wires (1) and hold the clip in place. - Ensure that the wires extend beyond the clip in each direction. - Ensure that no insulation is caught under the clip. 8. Center the crimp tool over the splice clip and wires. 9. Apply steady pressure until the crimp tool closes. Ensure that no strands of wire are cut. Page 84 6. To repair the terminal, refer to Terminal Repair. Terminal Repair 1. Slip the cable seal away from the terminal. 2. Cut the wire as close to the terminal as possible. 3. Slip a new cable seal onto the wire. 4, Strip 5 mm (3/16 in) of insulation from the wire 5. Crimp a new terminal to the wire. 6. Solder the crimp with rosin core solder. 7. Slide the cable seal toward the terminal. 8. Crimp the cable seal and the insulation. 9. If the connector is outside of the passenger compartment, apply grease to the connector. Reinstalling Terminal 1. In order to reuse a terminal or lead assembly. Refer to Wiring Repairs. 2. Ensure that the cable seal is kept on the terminal side of the splice. 3. Insert the lead from the back until it catches. 4. Install the TPA, CPA and/or the secondary locks. Pull to Seat Connectors Terminal Removal Follow the steps below in order to repair pull-to-seat connectors. 1. Remove the terminal position assurance (TPA) device, the connector position assurance (CPA) device, and/or the secondary lock. 2. Separate the connector halves. 3. Using the proper pick or removal tool (4) insert into the front of the connector Body. 4. Grasp the wire at the back of the connector Body and gently pull the terminal (1) from the connector Body (3). 5. Inspect the terminal for damage, if damaged refer to Terminal Repair. 6. Reform the locking tang (2) if the terminal is being reused. Terminal Repair 1. Slip the cable seal away from the terminal. 2. Cut the wire as close to the terminal as possible. 3. Slip a new cable seal onto the wire. 4. Strip 5 mm (3/16 in) of insulation from the wire. 5. Crimp a new terminal to the wire. 6. Solder the crimp with rosin core solder. 7. Slide the cable seal toward the terminal. 8. Crimp the cable seal and the insulation. 9. If the connector is outside of the passenger compartment, apply grease to the connector Terminal Installation 1. Inspect the terminal for damage. If damaged refer to Terminal Repair. 2. Reform the locking tang (2) if the terminal is being reused. Page 47 Steps 4 - 11 Deployment Outside Vehicle (Supplemental Restraint IP Module) Instrument Panel Control Module: Service and Repair Deployment Outside Vehicle (Supplemental Restraint IP Module) The inflator module may be deployed inside or outside of the vehicle. The method used depends upon the final disposition of the vehicle. Review the following procedures in order to determine which will work best in a given situation: Deployment Outside Vehicle (Supplemental Restraint IP Module) Dealers should refer to the latest Service Bulletins for live (undeployed) supplemental restraint IP module scrapping and disposal procedures. All others should contact a local dealer for these procedures. Dispose of deployed IP modules through normal refuse channels. Page 73 gpm-IDI Page 56 Part 8 Of 20 Page 71 DEC-EPA Page 93 reference during new procedures. A DMM should be used instead of a test light to check for voltage. While a test light shows whether voltage is present, a DMM indicates how much voltage is present. When testing for voltage or continuity at the connection, it is not necessary to separate the two halves of the connector. Unless testing a Weather Pack ®, a Metri Pack ® or other sealed system, always probe the connector from the back. Always check both sides of the connector. An accumulation of dirt and corrosion between contact surfaces is sometimes a cause of electrical problems. The ohmmeter function on a DMM shows how much resistance exists between two points along a circuit. Low resistance in a circuit means good continuity. Important: Disconnect the battery when measuring resistance with a DMM. This prevents incorrect readings. DMMs apply such a small voltage to measure resistance that the presence of voltages can upset a resistance reading. Diodes and solid state components in a circuit can cause a DMM to display a false reading. To find out if a component is affecting a measurement take a reading once, then reverse the leads and take a second reading. If the readings differ the solid state component is affecting the measurement. Following are examples of the various methods of connecting the DMM to the circuit to be checked: - Backprobe both ends of the connector and either hold the leads in place while manipulating the connector or tape the leads to the harness for continuous monitoring while you perform other operations or test driving. - Disconnect the harness at both ends of the suspected circuit where it connects either to a component or to other harnesses. Use the J 35616-A Connector Test Adapter Kit in order to connect the DMM to the circuit. - If the system that is being diagnosed has a specified pinout or breakout box, it may be used in order to simplify connecting the DMM to the circuit or for checking multiple circuits quickly. Troubleshooting With A Short Finder The J 8681-A can locate hidden shorts to ground. The short finder creates a pulsing magnetic field in the shorted circuit and shows the location of the short through the Body trim or sheet metal. Troubleshooting With A Test Light A test light can simply and quickly check a circuit for voltage. The J 34142-B test light is comprised of a 12 volt light bulb with an attached pair of leads. To properly operate this tool use the following procedure. 1. Attach one lead to ground. 2. Touch the other lead to various points along the circuit where voltage should be present. 3. When the bulb illuminates, there is voltage at the point being tested. Using Connector Test Adapters NOTE: Do not use paper clips or other substitutes as they can damage terminals and cause incorrect measurements. The J 35616-A Connect Test Adapter Kit contains various terminal pigtails for probing terminals. Connector test adapter kit allows the DMM to conduct tests and measurements at separated connectors, fuse, or relay terminals. Using Fused Jumper Wires Important: A fused jumper may not protect solid state components from being damaged. The J 36169-A fused jumper includes small clamp connectors that provide adaptation to most connectors without damage. This fused jumper wire is supplied with a 20 A fuse which may not be suitable for some circuits. Do not use a fuse with a higher rating than the fuse that protects the circuit being tested. Circuit Protection - Fuses Page 51 Part 3 Of 20 Page 76 NOx-POA Page 59 Part 11 Of 20 Page 75 LH-NO Headlamp Ground Relay Headlamp Relay: Locations Headlamp Ground Relay HDLP GND Relay The Headlamp Grounding Relay is in the Underhood Fuse Block. Page 82 Daytime Running Lamp Relay: Diagnostic Aids Checking Aftermarket Accessories Important: Do not connect aftermarket accessories into the following circuits: - SIR circuits, all such circuits are indicated on circuit diagrams with the SIR symbol. Refer to SIR Service Precautions Caution in Cautions and Notes. - OBDII circuits, all such circuits are indicated on circuit diagrams with the OBDII symbol. Refer to OBD II Symbol Description Notice in Cautions and Notices. Always check for aftermarket accessories (non-OEM) as the first step in diagnosing electrical problems. If the vehicle is so equipped, disconnect the system to verify that these add-on accessories are not the cause of the problems. Possible causes of vehicle problems related to aftermarket accessories include: - Power feeds connected to points other than the battery. - Antenna location. - Transceiver wiring located too close to vehicle electronic modules or wiring. - Poor shielding or poor connectors on antenna feed line. - Check for recent service bulletins detailing installation guidelines for aftermarket accessories. Connector Repairs The Connector Repairs section contains the following types of connector repair information. Using these elements together will make connector repair faster and easier: - Connector Position Assurance Locks. - Terminal Position Assurance Locks. - Push to Seat Connectors. - Repairing Damaged Wire Insulation. - Wiring Repairs. - Splicing Copper Wire Using Splice Clips. - Splicing Copper Wire Using Splice Clips. - Splicing Twisted or Shielded Cable. Connector Position Assurance Locks The Connector Position Assurance (CPA) is a small plastic insert that fits through the locking tabs of all the SIR system electrical connectors. The CPA ensures that the connector halves cannot vibrate apart. You must have the CPA in place in order to ensure good contact between the SIR mating terminals. Terminal Position Assurance Locks The Terminal Position Assurance (TPA) insert resembles the plastic combs used in the control module connectors. The TPA keeps the terminal securely seated in the connector Body. Do not remove the TPA from the connector Body unless you remove a terminal for replacement. Push to Seat Connectors Terminal Removal Follow the steps below in order to repair push to seat connectors. Locations FOG LP Relay Page 118 Steps 4 - 11 Page 45 RH Horn A Note How to Use Diagnostic System Checks The system check gives a summary of how the system operates and what actions occur. This is especially important when working on a new system. The system check will help identify symptoms, lead to diagnosis and confirm normal operation of the system after repair. Steps 1 - 2 Horns System Check How to Use Diagnostic Tables Diagnostic tables provide a procedure that will help you locate the condition in a circuit that is causing a malfunction. All diagnostic procedures are symptom based, to assist you in locating the condition as fast as possible. Diagnostic tables should exist for all possible (realistic) symptoms and diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs). Page 115 Hood Ajar Switch, Horns, And S114 Hood Ajar Switch, Horns, and S114 How to Use Connector End Views Connector end views show the cavity or terminal locations for all the related 2 - pin or larger connectors shown in the system schematic(s). The drawings show the connector's face as seen after the harness connector has been disconnected from a component or mating connector. Unused cavities are left blank in the table. In addition, the color and part number of the connector Body is provided along with the family/series name. Below is an example of a typical connector end view. RH Horn A Note Page 21 Cruise Control Module Locations Daytime Running Lamp Relay: Locations DRL Relay In the Underhood Fuse Block. Page 103 - Insert the wire into the splice sleeve barrel until it hits the barrel stop. - Close the handles of the crimp tool tightly until the crimper handles open when released. The crimper handles will not open until you apply the proper amount of pressure to the splice sleeve. Repeat steps 4 and 5 for the opposite end of the splice. 8. Shrink the insulation around the splice. - Using the heat torch apply heat to the crimped area of the barrel. - Gradually move the heat barrel to the open end of the tubing. The tubing will shrink completely as the heat is moved along the insulation. - A small amount of sealant will come out of the end of the tubing when sufficient shrinkage is achieved. Flat Wire Repairs NOTE: Be careful when you repair the flat wire within the flex wiring harness. External material of the flex wiring harness is Mylar Reg. This material can not be easily removed without damaging the flat wire. The flat wire within the flex wiring harness is not serviceable.If an open or short exists within the flex wiring harness the complete harness must be replaced. Page 97 10. Crimp the splice on each end (2). 11. Apply 60/40 rosin core solder to the opening in the back of the clip. Follow the manufacturer's instructions for the solder equipment. 12. Tape the splice. Roll on enough tape in order to duplicate the thickness of the insulation on the existing wires. Page 53 Part 5 Of 20 Page 67 Part 19 Of 20 Part 20 Of 20 Page 98 13. Additional tape can be applied to the wire if the wire does not belong in a conduit or another harness covering. Use a winding motion in order to cover the first piece of tape. Splicing Copper Wire Using Splice Sleeves Use crimp and seal splice sleeves to form a one-to-one splice on all types of insulation except tefzel and coaxial to form a one-to-one splice. Use tefzel and coaxial where there is special requirements such as moisture sealing. Follow the instructions below in order to splice copper wire using crimp and seal splice sleeves. Crimp And Seal Splice Table Crimp and Seal Splice Table Tools Required J 38125-B Terminal Repair Kit 1. Open the harness. - If the harness is taped, remove the tape. - To avoid wiring insulation damage, use a sewing ripper in order to cut open the harness. - If the harness has a black plastic conduit, pull out the desired wire. 2. Cut the wire. - Cut as little wire OFF the harness as possible. - Ensure that each splice is at least 40 mm (1.5 in) away from other splices, harness branches and connectors. This helps prevent moisture from bridging adjacent splices and causing damage. Page 50 Part 2 Of 20 Page 57 Part 9 Of 20 Page 116 RH Horn A Note How to Use Diagnostic System Checks The system check gives a summary of how the system operates and what actions occur. This is especially important when working on a new system. The system check will help identify symptoms, lead to diagnosis and confirm normal operation of the system after repair. Steps 1 - 2 Horns System Check How to Use Diagnostic Tables Diagnostic tables provide a procedure that will help you locate the condition in a circuit that is causing a malfunction. All diagnostic procedures are symptom based, to assist you in locating the condition as fast as possible. Diagnostic tables should exist for all possible (realistic) symptoms and diagnostic trouble codes (DTCs). Diagram Information and Instructions Headlamp Relay: Diagram Information and Instructions How to Use Electrical Schematics Important: The schematic does not represent the components and wiring as they physically appear on the vehicle. For example, a 4-foot length of wire is treated no differently in a schematic from one which is only a few inches long. When diagnosing a horn problem use the service information located in the Horns (cell 40) service category. The following schematic is a typical example of a schematic with its supporting text. The wiring schematic is the cornerstone of electrical diagnosis. Schematics break the entire electrical system into individual circuits, showing the electrical current paths when a circuit is operating properly. Wiring which is not part of the circuit of interest is referenced to another page where the circuit is shown complete. Schematics use a top (power) to bottom (ground) sequence to present electrical information. How to Use Component Location Views Component location views are line illustrations that indicate all of the vehicle's electrical components within each electrical system. Page 102 lead wire. - Do not remove or defeat the oxygen sensor ground wire (where applicable). Vehicles that utilize the ground wire sensor may rely on this ground as the only ground contact to the sensor. Removal of the ground wire will also cause poor engine performance. - To prevent damage due to water intrusion, be sure that the peripheral seal remains intact on the vehicle harness connector. The engine harness may be repaired using the J 38125-B. SIR Wiring Repairs J 38125-B Terminal Repair kit Important: Refer to Wiring Repairs in order to determine the correct wire size for the circuit being repaired. Using the correct wire size ensures that circuit integrity is not compromised. If any wire except the pigtail is damaged, repair the wire by splicing in a new section of wire of the same gauge size (0.5 mm, 0.8 mm, 1.0 mm, etc.). Use the sealed splices and splice crimping tool from the J 38125-B. Use the following wiring repair procedures to ensure the integrity of the sealed splice. Crimp And Seal Splice Table Important: Perform the following procedures in the listed order. Repeat the procedure if any wire strands are damaged. 1. Open the harness by removing any tape. To avoid wire insulation damage use a sewing seam ripper (available from sewing supply stores) to cut open the harness. 2. Cut the wire. - Cut as little wire OFF the harness as possible. The extra length of wire may be needed to change the location of a splice. - Ensure that each splice is at least 40 mm (1.5 in) away from other splices,harness branches and connectors. This helps prevent moisture from bridging adjacent splices and causing damage. 3. Select the proper size and type of wire. - The wire must be of equal or greater size than the original. - To find the correct wire size do one of the following: Find the wire on the schematic and convert the metric size to the equivalent AWG size. - Use an AWG wire gauge. - If unsure of the wire size, begin with the largest opening in the wire stripper and work down until achieving a clean strip of the insulation. - The wire's insulation must have the same or higher temperature rating. Use general purpose insulation for areas that are not subject to high temperatures. - Use a cross-linked polyethylene insulated wire for areas where high temperatures are expected. Important: Use Cross-linked polyethylene wire to replace PVC, but do not replace cross-linked polyethylene with PVC. Cross-linked polyethylene wire is not fuel resistant. Do not use to replace wire where there is the possibility of fuel contact. 4. Strip the insulation. - Strip approximately 7.5 mm (0.313 in) of insulation from each wire to be spliced. - Be careful to avoid nicking or cutting any of the strands. Check the stripped wire for nicks or cut strands. Important: If the wire is damaged repeat this procedure after removing the damaged section. 5. Select the proper sealed splice sleeve and crimp tool nest according to wire size. See the above table for color coding of the splice sleeves and the crimp tool nests. Use the crimp and sealed splice sleeves on all types of insulation except tefzel and coaxial. - Do not use the crimp and sealed splice sleeve to or from a splice with more than two wires coming together. 6. Position the splice sleeve. - J 38125-B to position the splice sleeve in the proper color nest of the Splice Crimp Tool. - Place the splice sleeve in the nest so that the crimp falls midway between the end of the barrel and the stop. The sleeve has a stop 3.in the middle of the barrel (2) to prevent the wire (1) from going further. Close the hand crimper handles slightly to hold the splice sleeve firmly in the proper nest. 7. Insert wires Into splice sleeve and crimp. Page 90 This test checks for voltage being lost along a wire or through a connection or switch. 1. Connect the positive lead of a DMM to the end of the wire or to one side of the connection, or to the switch whichever is closer to the battery. 2. Connect the negative lead to the other end of the wire or to the other side of the connection, or switch. 3. Operate the circuit. 4. The DMM will show the difference in voltage between the two points. Testing For Voltage NOTE: Do not insert a DMM test probe into any connector or fuse block terminal. The diameter of the DMM test probe will deform most terminals. A deformed terminal can cause a poor connection between the device, which can result in system failures. Always use the J 35616-A Connect Test Adapter Kit when using a DMM in order to probe terminals. This test checks for voltage along a wire through a connection or switch. 1. Apply power to the circuit. 2. Place meter leads in the COM (black) and The DTC ohm inputs. 3. Place the rotary switch (meter) in the The DTC (AC) or The DTC (DC) position. 4. Connect the positive lead of a DMM to the end of the wire, (or to one side of the connection or switch) which is closer to the battery. 5. Connect the negative lead to the other end of the wire (or the other side of the connection or switch). 6. Operate the circuit. Testing For Continuity With a DMM Continuity tests work well for detecting intermittent shorts to ground and can be performed by setting the DMM to ohms, then pressing the PEAK MIN MAX button. An audible tone is heard whenever the DMM detects continuity for at least 1 millisecond. This test checks for continuity along a wire, through a connection or switch. Page 65 Part 17 Of 20 Locations Door Lock Relay: Locations Door Lock Relay In the Body Relay Block. Door Unlock Relay In the Body Relay Block. Page 92 This test checks a short to ground along a wire or through a connection, or switch. With a DMM Set to Ohmmeter Function 1. Remove the open fuse. 2. Disconnect the battery. 3. Disconnect the load. 4. Connect one lead of the DMM to the fuse terminal on the load side 5. Connect the other lead to a known good ground. 6. Beginning near the fuse block, wiggle the harness from side to side. Continue this at convenient points (about 6 inches apart) while watching the DMM. 7. When the DMM displays low or no resistance, there is a short to ground in the wiring near that point. With a DMM Set to Voltage Function 1. Remove the open fuse. 2. Disconnect the load. 3. Connect a DMM across the fuse terminals (be sure that the fuse is powered). 4. Beginning near the fuse block, wiggle the harness from side to side. Continue this at convenient points (about 6 inches apart) while watching the DMM. 5. When the DMM displays voltage, there is a short to ground in the wiring near that point. With a Test Light 1. Remove the open fuse. 2. Disconnect the load. 3. Connect a test light across the fuse terminals (be sure that the fuse is powered). 4. Beginning near the fuse block, wiggle the harness from side to side. Continue this at convenient points (about 6 inches apart) while watching the test light. 5. When the test light glows there is a short to ground in the wiring near that point. Fuse Powering Several Loads 1. Review the system schematic and locate the fuse that is open. 2. Open the first connector or switch leading from the fuse to each load. 3. Connect a DMM across the fuse terminals (be sure that the fuse is powered). - When the DMM displays voltage the short is in the wiring leading to the first connector or switch. - If the DMM does not display voltage refer to the next step. 4. Close each connector or switch until the DMM displays voltage in order to find which circuit has the short. Troubleshooting With A Digital Multimeter NOTE: Do not insert a DMM test probe into any connector or fuse block terminal The diameter of the DMM test probe will deform most terminals. A deformed terminal can cause a poor connection between the device, which can result in system failures. Always use the J 35616-A Connect Test Adapter Kit when using a DMM in order to probe terminals. Important: Circuits which include any solid state control modules, such as the PCM, should be tested only with a 10 megohm or higher impedance J 39200 digital multimeter. The J 39200 Instruction Manual is a good source of information and should be read thoroughly upon receipt of the DMM as well as kept on hand for Component Locations Electronic Brake Control Module: Component Locations The Electronic Brake Control Module (EBCM) is part of the Brake Pressure Modulator Valve (BPMV), at the left rear wheelwell. Page 79 TBI-VAC Page 72 EPR-gnd Page 61 Part 13 Of 20 Page 14 Electronic Brake Control Module: Service and Repair Removal Procedure Important: After installation, calibrate the new EBCM to the tire size that is appropriate to the vehicle. Refer to Antilock Brake Systems; Testing and Inspection; Procedures; Description of On-Board Diagnostics; Scan Tool Diagnosis. 1. Disconnect Negative Battery Cable. 2. Remove the four T-25 Torx or screws (1) that fasten the EBCM to the BPMV. 3. Partially remove the EBCM (2) from the BPMV (4) enough to access the electrical connectors. Removal may require a light amount of force. Important: Do not use a tool to pry the EBCM or the BPMV. Excessive force will damage the EBCM. 4. Disconnect the four electrical connectors from EBCM. 5. Fully remove the EBCM (2) from the BPMV (4). Installation Procedure Important: Do not reuse the old mounting screws. Always install new mounting screws with the new EBCM. Important: Do not use RTV or any other type of sealant on the EBCM gasket or mating surfaces. 1. Connect the four electrical connectors to the EBCM. 2. Install EBCM (2) on to the BPMV (4). 3. Install the four new T-25 Torx screws (1) in the EBCM (2). Tighten Tighten the four T-25 Torx screws to 5 N.m (39 lb. in.) in an X-pattern. 4. Connect the negative battery cable. 5. Revise the tire calibration using the scan tool. 6. Return to Antilock Brake System; Testing and Inspection; Procedures; Diagnostic Stratagies. Page 44 Hood Ajar Switch, Horns, And S114 Hood Ajar Switch, Horns, and S114 How to Use Connector End Views Connector end views show the cavity or terminal locations for all the related 2 - pin or larger connectors shown in the system schematic(s). The drawings show the connector's face as seen after the harness connector has been disconnected from a component or mating connector. Unused cavities are left blank in the table. In addition, the color and part number of the connector Body is provided along with the family/series name. Below is an example of a typical connector end view. RH Horn A Note Page 121 Part 2 Of 20 Page 12 Electronic Brake Control Module: Connector Locations Electronic Brake Control Module Connector C1 (10 Cavities), is at the Body harness connector on the LH of the EBCM. EBCM Connector C2 (4 cavities), is at the SIR Body harness connector on the LH of the EBCM. EBCM Connector C3 (2 Cavities), is at the Body harness connector, LH of the EBCM. Page 52 Part 4 Of 20 Page 64 Part 16 Of 20 Page 89 Repair and Verify Fix From isolating the root cause, basically the problem has been diagnosed. Using the Component Location Table and the corresponding figure, quickly find C100 and the LT GRN wire, locate the exact trouble point and make the repair. Check the thoroughness of the repair by performing a final system check on the headlamp circuit. This of course means making sure that both high beams, both low beams, and the high beam indicator are working. Testing For Electrical Intermittents Use the following procedure to detect an intermittent circuit that is currently operating normally. Important: The J 39200 must be used to perform the following procedure since the DMM can monitor current, resistance or voltage while recording the minimum (MIN), and maximum (MAX) values measured. 1. Connect the J 39200 to both sides of a suspected connector, (still connected) or from one end of a suspected circuit to the other. Important: Refer to Troubleshooting with a Digital Multimeter 2. Select the appropriate voltage mode on the DMM. 3. Press the Range button to select the desired voltage range. 4. Press the MIN MAX button. The DMM displays 100 ms RECORD and emits an audible tone (beep). Important: The DMM is now ready to record and generates an audible tone for any change in voltage. The 100 ms RECORD mode is the amount of time used to record each snapshot of information used for calculating the AVG voltage. 5. Simulate the condition that is potentially causing an intermittent connection, either by wiggling the connections or the wiring, also by test driving or performing other operations. If an open or a high resistance condition is created voltage is present and the DMM emits a tone for as long as the condition exists. 6. Press the MIN MAX button once to display the MAX value and note the value. 7. Press the MIN MAX button twice for the MIN value and note the value. 8. Determine the difference between the MIN and MAX values. - If the variation between the recorded MIN and MAX voltage values is one volt or greater an intermittent open or high resistance condition exists. Repair condition as necessary. - If the variation between the recorded MIN and MAX voltage values is less than one volt an intermittent open or high resistance condition does not exist. Testing For Voltage Drop NOTE: Do not insert a DMM test probe into any connector or fuse block terminal. The diameter of the DMM test probe will deform most terminals. A deformed terminal can cause a poor connection between the device, which can result in system failures. Always use the J 35616-A Connect Test Adapter Kit when using a DMM in order to probe terminals. Page 85 3. Ensure that the cable seal is kept on the terminal side of the splice. 4. Insert the wire into the back of the connector Body. Push until the terminal locking tang locks into the connector Body. 5. Install the TPA, CPA and/or the secondary locks. Weather Pack Connectors The following is the proper procedure for the repair of Weather Pack Connectors. - Separate the connector halves (1). - Open the secondary lock. A secondary lock aids in terminal retention and is usually molded to the connector (1). - Grasp the wire and push the terminal to the forward most position. Hold the wire in this position. - Insert the Weather Pack TM terminal removal tool into the front (mating end) of the connector cavity until it rests on the cavity shoulder (1). - Gently pull on the wire to remove the terminal through the back of the connector (2). Important: Never use force to remove a terminal from a connector. - Inspect the terminal and connector for damage. Repair as necessary. Refer to Repairing Connector Terminals. - Reform the lock tang (2) and reset terminal in connector Body. - Close secondary locks and join connector halves. - Verify that circuit is complete and working satisfactorily. - Perform system check. Repairing Connector Terminals Use the following repair procedures in order to Repair the following terminals: - Push to seat terminals Page 81 Engine Controls Schematic References Page 95 Positive Temperature Coefficient (PTC) Circuit Breaker: This type greatly increases its resistance when excessive current passes through it. The excessive current heats the PTC device, as the device heats its resistance increases. Eventually the resistance gets so high that the circuit is effectively open. Unlike the ordinary circuit breaker the PTC unit will not reset until the circuit is opened, by removing the voltage from its terminals. Once the voltage is removed the circuit breaker will re-close within a second or two. Circuit Protection - Fusible Links Circuit Protection - Fusible Links Fusible link is wire designed to melt and break continuity when excessive current is applied. It is often located between or near the battery and starter or electrical center. Use a continuity tester or a J 39200 DMM at each end of the wire containing the fusible link in order to determine if it is broken. If broken, it must be replaced with fusible link of the same gage size. Repairing a Fusible Link Important: Fusible links cut longer than 225 mm (approx. 9 inches) will not provide sufficient overload protection. Refer to Splicing Copper Wire Using Splice Clips. Repairing Damaged Wire Insulation If the conductive portion of the wire is not damaged, locate the problem and apply tape around the wire. If the damage is more extensive, replace the faulty segment of the wire. Refer to Splicing Copper Wire. Using Splice Clips and follow the instruction to repair the wire. Wire Size Conversion Table Wire Size Conversion Table Splicing Copper Wire Using Splice Clips Tools Required J 38125-B Terminal Repair Kit 1. Open the harness. - If the harness is taped, remove the tape. - To avoid wiring insulation damage, use a sewing ripper in order to cut open the harness. - If the harness has a black plastic conduit, pull out the desired wire. 2. Cut the wire. - Cut as little wire OFF the harness as possible. - Ensure that each splice is at least 40 mm (1.5 in) away from other splices, harness branches and connectors. This helps prevent moisture from bridging adjacent splices and causing damage. 3. Select the proper size and type of wire. Page 112 Headlamp Relay: Locations Headlamp Power Relay HDLP PWR Relay The Headlamp Power Relay is in the Underhood Fuse Block. Service and Repair Compressor Clutch Relay: Service and Repair Removal Procedure CAUTION: Refer to Battery Disconnect Caution in Service Precautions. 1. Disconnect the battery negative cable. 2. Remove the protective cover from the under hood junction block. 3. Remove the compressor relay from the under hood junction block. Installation Procedure 1. Install the compressor relay to the under hood junction block. 2. Install the protective hood to the under hood junction block. 3. Connect the battery negative cable. 4. Test the circuit operation. Page 104 Schematic and Routing Diagrams - Cell 102: DRL and Headlamp Power Relays Page 60 Part 12 Of 20 Page 87 General Electrical Diagnosis Procedures Basic Knowledge Required Without a basic knowledge of electricity, it will be difficult to use the diagnostic procedures contained in this section. You should understand the basic theory of electricity and know the meaning of voltage (volts), current (amps) and resistance (ohms). You should understand what happens in a circuit with an open or a shorted wire. You should be able to read and understand a wiring diagram. The following four-step troubleshooting procedure is recommended: Check the Problem Perform a System Check to determine a symptom. Don't waste time fixing part of the problem! Do not begin disassembly or testing until you have narrowed down the possible causes. Read the Electrical Schematic Study the schematic and read the Circuit Description text to gain an understanding of how the circuit should work. Check circuits that share wiring with the problem circuit. (Shared circuits are shown on Power Distribution and Ground Distribution.) Try to operate the shared circuits. If the shared circuits work, then the shared wiring is OK. The cause must be within the wiring used only by the problem circuit. If several circuits fail at the same time, chances are the power (fuse) or ground circuit is faulty. Find the fault and repair Narrow down the possible causes. - Check System Fuse(s). - Check System Ground(s) - For systems with bulb failures, check bulb(s) prior to beginning diagnostic tables. - Perform a visual inspection of system components, and accessible related wiring prior to beginning diagnostic tables. Make the necessary measurements or checks as given in the System Diagnosis. Before replacing a component, check power, signal and ground wires at the component harness connector. If the checks and connections are OK, the most probable cause is component failure. Test the Repair Repeat the System Check to verify that the fault has been corrected and that no other faults were induced during the repair. Intermittents and Poor Connections Diagnosis Most intermittents are caused by faulty electrical connections or wiring, although occasionally a sticking relay or solenoid can be a problem. Some items to check are: - Poor mating of connector halves, or terminals not fully seated in the connector Body (backed out). - Dirt or corrosion on the terminals. The terminals must be clean and free of any foreign material which could impede proper terminal contact. - Damaged connector Body, exposing the terminals to moisture and dirt, as well as not maintaining proper terminal orientation with the component or mating connector - Improperly formed or damaged terminals. All connector terminals in problem circuits should be checked carefully to ensure good contact tension. Use a corresponding mating terminal to check for proper tension. Refer to Checking Terminal Contact in this section for the specific procedure. - The J 35616-A must be used whenever a diagnostic procedure requests checking or probing a terminal. Using the adapter will ensure that no damage to the terminal will occur, as well as giving an idea of whether contact tension is sufficient. If contact tension seems incorrect, refer to checking terminal contact in this section for specifics - Poor terminal to wire connection. Some conditions which fall under this description are poor crimps, poor solder joints, crimping over wire insulation rather than the wire itself, corrosion in the wire to terminal contact area, etc. - Wire insulation which is rubbed through, causing an intermittent short as the bare area touches other wiring or parts of the vehicle. - Wiring broken inside the insulation. This condition could cause a continuity check to show a good circuit, but if only one or two strands of a multi-strand type wire are intact, resistance could be far too high. To avoid any of the above problems when making wiring or terminal repairs, always follow the instructions for wiring and terminal repair detailed in Wiring Repairs and Connector Repairs. Probing Electrical Connectors Frontprobe NOTE: Do not insert a DMM test probe into any connector or fuse block terminal The diameter of the DMM test probe will deform most terminals. A deformed terminal can cause a poor connection between the device, which can result in system failures. Always use the J 35616-A Connect Test Adapter Kit when using a DMM in order to probe terminals. Important: When reconnecting connectors or replacing terminals always be sure to reinstall the Connector Position Assurance (CPA) and Terminal Position Assurance (TPA). Page 91 NOTE: Do not insert a DMM test probe into any connector or fuse block terminal The diameter of the DMM test probe will deform most terminals. A deformed terminal can cause a poor connection between the device, which can result in system failures. Always use the J 35616-A Connect Test Adapter Kit when using a DMM in order to probe terminals. 1. Remove the negative battery cable. 2. Place the leads of the DMM in COM (black) and V/ohms (red) inputs. 3. Set the rotary dial of the DMM to ohms. 4. Press the PEAK MIN MAX button. 5. Connect one lead of the DMM to one end of the circuit to test. 6. Connect the other lead to the other end of the circuit. 7. If the DMM displays low or no resistance and a tone is heard the circuit being tested has good continuity. With a Test Light This test checks for continuity along a wire, through a connection or switch. NOTE: Do not insert a DMM test probe into any connector or fuse block terminal The diameter of the DMM test probe will deform most terminals. A deformed terminal can cause a poor connection between the device, which can result in system failures. Always use the J 35616-A Connect Test Adapter Kit when using a DMM in order to probe terminals. 1. Remove the fuse from the suspect circuit. 2. Connect one lead of the test light to one end of the circuit to test 3. Connect one end of the circuit to be tested to ground. 4. If the test light is not self-powered connect the other lead to a battery positive voltage source. 5. If the test light illuminates (full intensity) then the circuit being tested has good continuity. Testing For Short to Ground Page 13 Electronic Brake Control Module: Description and Operation Electronic Brake Control Module The Electronic Brake Control Module (EBCM) is part of the EHCU. The EBCM is the electronic portion of the EHCU. The major function of the EBCM is to control the BPMV. Inputs to the EBCM include the following items: - Three wheel speed sensors - Stop Lamp Switch - Differential pressure - Ignition switch voltage - Unswitched battery voltage Outputs of the EBCM include the following items: - Three isolation solenoids (internal to the EHCU) - Three dump solenoids (internal to the EHCU) - The amber ABS indicator lamp - The red BRAKE warning lamp - The pump motor A diagnostic serial data line (ABS only) is also used for diagnostic service tools and assembly plant testing. The EBCM monitors the speed of each wheel. If any wheel approaches lockup,the EBCM controls the solenoids (isolation solenoid and dump solenoid) in order to reduce brake pressure to the wheel approaching lockup. Once the wheel regains traction, brake pressure is increased until the wheel again approaches lockup. This cycle repeats until either the vehicle comes to a stop, the brake is released, or the wheel is no longer approaching lockup. The EBCM also runs self diagnostics in order to check for any system malfunctions. Refer to Self Diagnostics. If the EBCM detects a malfunction with the system, the ECBM will illuminate the amber ABS indicator in order to alert the driver of a malfunction. Electro-Hydraulic Control Unit The Electro-Hydraulic Control Unit (EHCU) is located in the left hand side of the engine compartment. The EHCU assembly includes the Electronic Brake Control module (EBCM) and the Brake Pressure Modulator Valve (BPMV).The EHCU regulates hydraulic pressure in the brake system during an antilock stop. Tire Size Calibration The EBCM accepts wheel speed signals from several different sizes of tire and wheel combinations. All vehicles are pre-programmed from the factory with the proper tire size calibration. Whenever you replace the EBCM or change the tire size, you must reset the tire size calibration in the EBCM using the scan tool. Refer to Antilock Brake System; Testing and Inspection; Procedures; Description of On-Board Diagnostics; Scan Tool Diagnosis. Once programmed, this calibration will remain, even if the battery is disconnected or if the EBCM is removed from the vehicle. Page 46 Steps 1 - 3 Page 22 Cruise Control Module: Description and Operation The cruise control module assembly mounts to the cowl. The assembly consists of an electronic controller and an electric stepper motor that varies the throttle with each cruise control mode. The module assembly is not serviceable. Page 55 Part 7 Of 20 Page 20 Body Wiring Harness, Engine Compartment Page 83 1. Remove the terminal position assurance (TPA) device, the connector position assurance (CPA) device, and/or the secondary lock. 2. Separate the connector halves (1). 3. Use the proper pick or removal tool (1) in order to release the terminal. 4. Gently pull the cable and the terminal (2) out of the back of the connector. 5. Re-form the locking device if you are going to reuse the connector (1). Page 63 Part 15 Of 20 Page 69 avg-CEAB Page 117 Steps 1 - 3 Page 68 A-Auto Page 99 3. Select the proper size and type of wire. - The wire must be of equal or greater size than the original. - The wire's insulation must have the same or higher temperature rating (4). Use general purpose insulation for areas that are not subject to high temperatures. - Use a cross-linked polyethylene insulated wire for areas where high temperatures are expected. Important: Use Cross-linked polyethylene wire to replace PVC, but do not replace cross-linked polyethylene with PVC. Cross-linked polyethylene wire is not fuel resistant. Do not use to replace wire where there is the possibility of fuel contact. 4. Strip the insulation. - Select the correct size opening in the wire stripper or work down from the largest size. - Strip approximately 7.5 mm (5/16 inches) of insulation from each wire to be spliced (1). 5. Select the proper splice sleeve (2) and the required crimp nest tool, refer to the Crimp and Seal Splice Table. 6. Place the nest tool in the J 38125 crimp tool. 7. Place the splice sleeve in the crimp tool nest so that the crimp falls at point 1 on the splice. 8. Close the hand crimper handles slightly in order to hold the splice sleeve firmly in the proper crimp tool nest. 9. Insert the wires into the splice sleeve until the wire hits the barrel stop. The splice sleeve has a stop in the middle of the barrel in order to prevent the wire from passing through the splice (3). 10. Close the handles of the J 38125 until the crimper handles open when released. The crimper handles will not open until the proper amount of pressure is applied to the splice sleeve. 11. Shrink the insulation around the splice. - Using the heat torch apply heat to the crimped area of the barrel. - Gradually move the heat barrel to the open end of the tubing. The tubing will shrink completely as the heat is moved along the insulation. - A small amount of sealant will come out of the end of the tubing when sufficient shrinkage is achieved. Splicing Twisted or Shielded Cable Twisted/shielded cable is used in order to protect wiring from electrical noise. Two-conductor cable of this construction is used between the radio and the Delco-Bose Reg speaker/amplifier units and other applications where low level, sensitive signals must be carried. Follow the instructions below in order to repair the twisted/shielded cable. Page 80 VATS-YEL Page 49 Part 1 Of 20 Page 120 Part 1 Of 20 Page 78 RPM-tach Page 58 Part 10 Of 20