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Summary of Content
Routine Maintenance Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Engine Serial Number The engine serial number is stamped into the clutch casing on all vehicles. The first five digits indicate engine model identification. The remaining numbers refer to production sequence. This same number is also stamped onto the Vehicle/Engine Identification plate mounted on the hood bracket. Print Fig. Fig. 1: Vehicle information plate and color tag location Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Transaxle Serial Number See Figures 1, 2 and 3 The transaxle serial number is stamped on the top of the transaxle/clutch case. Print Fig. Fig. 1: Identification number locations-Integra Fig. Fig. 2: Identification number locations-Legend Fig. Fig. 3: Identification number locations-Vigor Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Vehicle Identification Number See Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4 Print Fig. Fig. 1: Vehicle information plate and color tag location Fig. Fig. 2: Identification numbere locations - Integra Fig. Fig. 3: Identification numbere locations - Legend Fig. Fig. 4: Identification numbere locations - VIgor Vehicle identification numbers are mounted on the top edge of the instrument panel and are visible from the outside. There are also identification plates located on the firewall and the rear door jamb of the driver's door. Back to Top Engine Electrical Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide ACURA PGM-IG ELECTRONIC IGNITION The Acura PGM-IG ignition system is part of the PGM-FI fuel injection system. Complete testing of both systems can be found in Fuel System of this guide. Print Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Component Replacement DISTRIBUTOR Print Removal & Installation INTEGRA See Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4 Fig. Fig. 1: Installation position of the spark plug wires on the distributor cap-1990-93 Integra Fig. Fig. 2: Exploded view of the distributor-Integra Fig. Fig. 3: Removing the distributor cap-Integra Fig. Fig. 4: Removing the rotor-Integra 1. Disconnect engine wire harness and connectors from distributor. 2. Disconnect the spark plug wires from distributor cap. 3. Remove distributor hold-down bolts, and remove distributor from cylinder head. Coat new O-ring with engine oil before installation. To install: 4. Use new O-ring on distributor housing. 5. Slip distributor into position. Lugs on end of distributor and its mating grooves in camshaft end are both offset to eliminate possibility of installing distributor 180 degrees out of time. 6. Install hold-down bolts, hand tighten. 7. Connect engine wire harness and connector to distributor. 8. Connect the spark plug wires. 9. Set timing, using a timing light, and then torque the hold-down bolts to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). 1986-90 LEGEND See Figures 5, 6 and 7 Fig. Fig. 5: Exploded view of the distributor-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 6: Installation position of the spark plug wires on the distributor cap-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 7: Distributor installation-1986-90 Legend 1. Disconnect engine wire harness and connectors from distributor. 2. Disconnect coil wire and spark plug wires from distributor cap. 3. Remove distributor hold-down bolt, and remove distributor from cylinder head. Coat new O-ring with engine oil before install. To install: 4. Use new O-ring on distributor housing. 5. Slip distributor into position. Lugs on end of distributor and its mating grooves in camshaft end are both offset to eliminate possibility of installing distributor 180 degrees out of time. 6. Install hold-down bolt and tighten. 7. Connect engine wire harness and connector to distributor. 8. Connect coil wire and spark plug wires. VIGOR See Figures 8, 9 and 10 Fig. Fig. 8: Distributor installation-Vigor 1. Disconnect the spark plug wires and coil wire from the distributor cap. 2. Remove distributor hold-down bolts, and remove distributor from cylinder head. Coat new O-ring with engine oil before installation. To install: Fig. Fig. 9: Exploded view of the distributor-Vigor Fig. Fig. 10: Installation position of the spark plug wires on the distributor cap-Vigor 3. Use new O-ring on distributor housing. 4. Slip distributor into position. Lugs on end of distributor and its mating grooves in camshaft end are both offset to eliminate possibility of installing distributor 180 degrees out of time. COIL AND SPARK PLUGS Removal & Installation 1991-93 LEGEND See Figure 11 Fig. Fig. 11: Removal of the ignition coils and spark plugs-1991-93 Legend 1. Disconnect the negative battery terminal. 2. Remove the ignition coil covers. 3. Disconnect the electrical connectors from the ignition coils and carefully pull the coils from the spark plugs. The front and rear ignition coils and covers are different, be sure to use the correct part when installing them. To install: 4. Position the ignition coil onto the spark plug and carefully push it in place. 5. Connect the electrical connector on the coil. 6. Install the coil covers and secure the coils in place with the retaining screws. 7. Connect the negative battery cable. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Diagnosis and Testing DISTRIBUTOR Print Top End Inspection 1. Check for rough or pitted rotor and cap terminals. 2. Scrape or file off carbon deposits. Smooth rotor terminal with an oil stone or No. 600 sandpaper, if rough. 3. Check distributor cap for cracks, wear and damages. If necessary, clean or replace it. IGNITER Input Test The PGM-FI ECU and tachometer should be normal. When the self diagnostic indicator blinks, perform self diagnostic checks on the fuel system. Perform an input test for the igniter unit after completing test on the ignition and fuel systems. INTEGRA See Figure 1 Fig. Fig. 1: Terminal locations for the igniter and ignition coil-Integra 1. Remove the distributor cap, rotor and leak cover. 2. Turn the ignition switch ON check for battery voltage between the positive terminal and ground. Voltage should be present. If voltage is not present, check for an open in the BLK/YEL wire or a disconnected terminal. 3. If voltage is present, disconnect the BLK/YEL wire from the igniter. Check for battery voltage between the BLK/YEL positive wire and ground. If voltage is not present, check for an open in the BLK/YEL wire between the ignition coil and the igniter. 4. If voltage is present, disconnect the WHT/BLU wire from the igniter. Check for battery voltage between the WHT/BLU wire and ground. Voltage should be present. If voltage is not present, check for an open in the WHT/BLU wire between the ignition coil and the igniter or a disconnected terminal. 5. If voltage is present, check for continuity between the igniter body and distributor housing. 6. If all tests check good and the system still fails to function, replace the igniter. 1986-1990 LEGEND See Figure 2 Fig. Fig. 2: Testing voltage points at the igniter harness-1986-90 Legend 1. Disconnect the 4 pin connector on from the igniter. 2. Turn the ignition switch ON . Check for voltage between the BLK/YEL wire and ground. Battery voltage should be present. 3. If not, check the BLK/YEL wire for voltage, between the ignition switch, ignition coil and igniter, if voltage is present, proceed to the next step. If voltage is not present, repair open circuit. 4. Turn the ignition switch ON . Check for voltage between the BLK/YEL wire and ground. Voltage should be present. 5. If voltage is not present, check the BLU wire, between the ignition coil and igniter. Also check for voltage at the ignition coil. 6. If voltage is not present, proceed to next step. 7. Check the for voltage at the RED/BLU wire, between the PGM-FI ECU and igniter. 8. If all test check good, replace the igniter unit. 1991-93 LEGEND See Figure 3 Fig. Fig. 3: Testing the igniter-1991-93 Legend 1. Disconnect the 8 pin connector from the igniter. Make the following tests at the harness pins. 2. Check the BLK wire and BLK/O wire for continuity to ground. Continuity should exists. If not, check for poor ground connection at G102, for Legend. If okay, check for a faulty ignition coil or and open circuit. 3. Turn the ignition switch ON , check for voltage at between the following circuits. Voltage should be present at each point: A. WHT and ground B. WHT/GRN and ground C. WHT/BLK and ground D. WHT/BLU and ground E. WHT/YEL and ground F. WHT/RED and ground 4. If voltage was not present at each point, check for a blown fuse; No. 25 fuse for Legend. Both fuses are (30 amp). If ok, check for a faulty ignition coil or an open circuit. VIGOR 1. Disconnect the 4 pin connector from the igniter. 2. Check for continuity between the BLK wire and ground. 3. If there is no continuity, proceed to the next step. If continuity is present, check for an open in the BLK wire, disconnected terminals or a poor ground connection. 4. With the ignition switch ON , there should be battery voltage between the BLK/YEL wire and BLK wire. 5. If voltage is not present, check for an open in the BLK/YEL wire, a disconnected terminal or perform a coil test. If voltage is present, proceed to the next step. 6. With the ignition switch ON , there should be battery voltage between the BLU wire and BLK wire. 7. If voltage is not present, check for, an open in the BLU wire between the ignition coil and the igniter or perform a coil test. IGNITION COIL Testing INTEGRA See Figure 4 Fig. Fig. 4: Coil resistance test-Integra 1. With ignition switch OFF , remove the distributor cap. 2. Remove the 2 screws to disconnect the BLK/YEL front terminal A and WHT/BLU from terminal B of the coil. 3. Using an ohmmeter, check resistance between terminals. Replace coil if resistance is not within specification. Resistance will vary with coil temperature. Specifications are at 70°F (20°C). 4. Check that the primary winding resistance between terminals A and B is 0.6-0.8 ohms. 5. Check that the secondary winding resistance between terminals A and the coil tower is 9760-14640 ohms. 6. Replace coil if the resistance is not within specifications. 1986-90 LEGEND See Figures 5 and 6 Fig. Fig. 5: Coil resistance test-1986-90 Legend with manual transaxle Fig. Fig. 6: Coil resistance test-1986-90 Legend with automatic transaxle and Vigor 1. With ignition switch OFF , disconnect primary connectors and coil wire. 2. Using an ohmmeter, check resistance between terminals. Replace coil if resistance is not within specification. Resistance will vary with coil temperature. Specifications are at 70°F (20°C). 3. Check that the primary winding resistance between terminals A and D is 0.3-0.4 ohms. 4. Check that the secondary winding resistance between terminals A and the coil tower. If equipped with manual transaxle the resistance will be 9040-13560 ohms, if equipped with automatic transaxle, the resistance will be 14400-21600 ohms. 5. Check that the resistance between B and D terminals is 2090-2310 ohms. 6. Check continuity between A and C terminals. Replace coil if no continuity. 1991-93 LEGEND See Figure 7 Fig. Fig. 7: Testing the coil resistance-1991-93 Legend 1. With the ignition switch OFF . Remove the ignition coil. 2. Using an ohmmeter, check resistance between terminals. Replace coil if resistance is not within specification. Resistance will vary with coil temperature. Specifications are at 77°F (25°C) 3. Check that the primary winding resistance between terminals A and D is 0.9-1.1 ohms. 4. If the primary winding resistance is ok, substitute a known good ignition coil and check the system operation. If the system is normal, replace the original ignition coil. VIGOR 1. With the ignition switch OFF , disconnect the 4 pin connector and ignition coil wire. 2. Using an ohmmeter, check resistance between terminals. Replace coil if resistance is not within specification. Resistance will vary with coil temperature. Specifications are at 70°F (20°C) 3. Check that the primary winding resistance between terminals A and D is 0.3-0.5 ohms. 4. Check that the secondary winding resistance between terminals A and the coil tower the resistance should be between 10800-16200 ohms. 5. Check that the resistance between B and D terminals is 2090-2310 ohms. 6. Check continuity between A and C terminals. Replace coil if no continuity. RADIO CONDENSER Capacity Test 1. Using an appropriate condenser tester, measure the condenser capacity. 2. The condenser capacity should be 0.47plus or minus0.09 microfarads. Although the radio noise condenser is intended to reduce ignition noise, condenser failure may can cause the engine to stop running. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide General Information In 1986-90, Acura used the Programmed Ignition (PGM-IG) system in both the Integra and Legend. This ignition system is basically comprised of a distributor, an igniter, a control box, a high energy coil and related ignition wires. This ignition system is used in the 1986-93 Integra, 1986-1990 Legend and 1992-93 Vigor. Print The distributor contains a reluctor mounted on a rotor shaft and a magnet mounted on a base plate. The pick-up coil is located around the rotor shaft but does not rotate with the shaft. The programmed ignition employed on these vehicles, provides optimum control of ignition timing by determining the optimum timing using a microcomputer in response to engine speed and vacuum pressure in the intake manifold, which are transmitted by signals from CRANK/CYL sensor, TDC sensor, throttle angle sensor, coolant temperature sensor and MAP sensor. This system, not dependent on a governor or vacuum diaphragm, is capable of setting lead angles with complicated characteristics which cannot be provided by conventional governors or diaphragms. On the Integra, the igniter, and ignition coil are apart of the distributor assembly. The Legend, the igniter and ignition coil are separate of the distributor and are located near the control box. The igniter contains 3 resistors, 3 diodes and 2 transistors. The transistors act as switches which are activated at a precise voltage. When the ignition is switched ON , the switching of the transistors in the igniter ensures that no current can flow in the ignition coil primary windings. When the engine is cranked, the reluctor moves through the magnetic field created by the stator and, when the reluctor teeth are aligned with the stator projections, a small AC voltage is created. The igniter amplifies this voltage and uses it to switch the transistors so that an earth path is provided to the primary circuit. As the reluctor teeth move out of alignment with the stator projections, an abrupt change occurs in the AC voltage. The transistors are switched again and the primary circuit earth path is broken. This induces a high voltage in the ignition coil secondary winding. A time control circuit in the igniter controls the charging time for the ignition coil according to engine speed, this reduces consumption at low engine speeds and prevents secondary voltage drop at high engine speeds. The 1991-93 Legends are equipped with a distributorless ignition system. This system is still considered as Programmed Ignition (PGM-IG) system. The basic difference is that the distributorless system incorporates 1 ignition coil per cylinder as opposed to the distributor type system, which uses 1 ignition coil for the entire system. System operation is accomplished when the ignition switch is in the RUN or START position. Battery current is applied through each of the ignition coils to the igniter. The igniter acts as a switch to control current through the primary windings of the ignition coils. The igniter is controlled by the PGM-FI electronic unit. When current to the ignition coil is stopped, a high voltage current flows to the spark plug. The ignition system is controlled by inputs to the PGM-FI electronic control unit. The inputs include; detonation, engine RPM, accelerator position, coolant temperature, ignition timing adjustment, manifold pressure, crankshaft position and exhaust oxygen content. Traction control and the automatic transmission also affect the ignition system. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Service Precautions Print Do not leave the ignition key turned ON for more than 10 minutes, while the engine is not running. Make sure all EFI harness connectors are fastened securely. A poor connection can cause an extremely high surge voltage in the coil and condenser and result in damage to integrated circuits. Keep EFI all parts and harnesses dry during service. Before attempting to remove any parts, turn OFF the ignition switch and disconnect the battery ground cable. Always use a 12 volt battery as a power source. Do not attempt to disconnect the battery cables with the engine running. Do not depress the accelerator pedal when starting. Make sure the igniter is properly grounded to the body. Never allow the coil or tachometer terminals to touch ground or damage will result to the igniter or coil. Back to Top Engine & Engine Overhaul Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Alternator The alternator converts the mechanical energy which is supplied by the drive belt into electrical energy by electromagnetic induction. When Print the ignition switch is turned ON , current flows from the battery, through the charging system light or ammeter, to the voltage regulator and finally to the alternator. When the engine is started, the drive belt turns the rotating field (rotor) in the stationary windings (stator), inducing alternating current. This alternating current is converted into usable direct current by the diode rectifier. Most of this current is used to charge the battery and power the electrical components of the vehicle. A small part is returned to the field windings of the alternator enabling it to increase its output. When the current in the field windings reaches a predetermined control voltage, the voltage regulator grounds the circuit, preventing any further increase. The cycle is continued so that the voltage remains constant. PRECAUTIONS Observe the following precautions to prevent damage to the alternator. Observe the proper polarity of the battery connections by making sure the positive (+) and negative (-) terminal connections are not reversed. Misconnection will allow current to flow in the reverse direction, resulting in damaged diodes and an overheated wire harness. Never ground or short out an alternator or regulator terminals. Never operate the alternator unless all wiring is connected. Always remove the battery or disconnect the output lead while charging it. Always disconnect the ground cable when replacing any electrical components. Never subject the alternator to excessive heat or dampness if the engine is being steam cleaned. Never use arc welding equipment with the alternator connected. REMOVAL & INSTALLATION 1986-1989 Integra See Figure 1 Fig. Fig. 1: Alternator mounting-1986-90 Integra 1. Disconnect the negative battery terminal. 2. Label and disconnect the wires from the plugs on the rear of the alternator. 3. Remove the alternator harness cover, if equipped, the alternator bolts, the V-belt and the alternator. To install: 4. Position the alternator into the brackets, connect the V-belt and loosely install the bolts. 5. Adjust the alternator belt tension and torque the bolts to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm). 1990-93 Integra See Figure 2 Fig. Fig. 2: Alternator mounting-1991-93 Integra 1. It is necessary to remove the halfshaft to remove the alternator. Disconnect the negative battery cable. 2. Raise the locking tab on the left front spindle nut and loosen the nut with a socket. 3. Raise and safely support the vehicle and remove the left front wheel. 4. Remove the damper fork nut and damper pinch bolt. Remove the damper fork. 5. Remove the knuckle-to-lower arm castle nut and separate the lower ball joint using a suitable puller with the pawls applied to the lower arm. 6. Pull the knuckle outward and remove the halfshaft outboard CV-joint from the knuckle using a plastic mallet. 7. Carefully pry the inner CV-joint out of the intermediate shaft and remove the halfshaft. Do not pull on the driveshaft, as the CV-joint may come apart. Use care when prying out the assembly and pull it straight to avoid damaging the intermediate shaft seals. 8. Disconnect and tag the alternator wire connection from the alternator. Remove the terminal nut and the white wire from the B terminal. 9. Loosen the adjusting nut and remove the alternator nut. Remove the alternator belt from the alternator pulley. Remove the lower through bolt and raise the alternator. 10. Remove the 3 mounting bracket bolts and mounting brackets. Remove the adjusting nut and upper through bolt, pull out the alternator. To install: 11. Position the alternator and install the through bolt and adjusting nut. Install the mounting brackets and mounting bracket bolts and torque to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm). 12. Lower the alternator and install the lower through bolt. Install the alternator belt and adjusting nut. Tension the belt and torque the adjusting nut to 17 ft. lbs. (24 Nm). 13. Reconnect all the wiring. 14. Use a new set ring on the end of the inner CV-joint and slide it into the intermediate shaft. Use the plastic mallet to tap in on the halfshaft and set the ring. 15. Slide the outer CV-joint into place and position the ball joint in the lower arm. Install the nut and torque to 40 ft. lbs. (55 Nm) and tighten as necessary to install a new cotter pin. 16. Install the damper fork, pinch bolt and fork nut. Torque the pinch bolt to 32 ft. lbs. (44 Nm) and the fork nut to 47 ft. lbs. (65 Nm). 17. Install a new self-locking spindle nut and wheel and place the vehicle on the ground before torquing the spindle nut. Attempting to torque the spindle nut while the vehicle is on jack stands or a lift may cause the vehicle to fall. 18. With the vehicle on the ground, torque the spindle nut to 134 ft. lbs. (185 Nm). 19. Reconnect the negative battery cable. 1986-90 Legend and Vigor See Figures 3 and 4 Fig. Fig. 3: Alternator mounting-Vigor Fig. Fig. 4: Alternator mounting-1986-90 Legend 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. 2. Remove the alternator belt and wire covers. 3. Disconnect the alternator wiring. 4. Loosen the through bolt and the adjuster bolt and remove the belt. 5. Remove the through bolt and alternator bolt and lift the alternator out. 6. Installation is the reverse of removal. Torque the through bolt to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm) and the nut to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). 1991-93 Legend See Figure 5 Fig. Fig. 5: Alternator mounting-1991-93 Legend 1. Disconnect both battery cables and remove the battery and the battery base. 2. Remove the adjusting lock bolt and the lower mounting bolt and slip the belt off the pulley. 3. Rotate the alternator counterclockwise far enough to get the bolt hole past the bracket and pull the alternator straight forward. 4. Tilt the alternator down in front and disconnect the wiring to remove the alternator. 5. Installation is the reverse of removal. Torque the lower mounting bolt to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm) and the adjuster lock bolt to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Camshafts and Rocker Shafts REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print Integra See Figures 1 through 5 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Remove the timing belt cover and cylinder head cover. 2. Rotate the crankshaft to TDC of No. 1 piston and remove the timing belt. 3. Remove the camshaft sprockets. 4. To check camshaft end-play: Fig. Fig. 1: Camshaft holder positioning and identification-1986-90 Integra Fig. Fig. 2: Installing the camshaft holder bolts-1986-90 Integra 1. Loosen the valve adjusters to remove as much spring tension as possible. 2. Loosen the end bearing cap bolts 1 turn. 3. Install the dial indicator. 4. Push the camshaft fully towards the back of the head, zero the dial indicator and push the camshaft fully the other way to read end-play. 5. End-play on a new camshaft should be 0.002-0.006 in. (0.05-0.15mm), 0.020 in. (0.5mm) is the service limit. 5. To remove the camshaft bearing caps, loosen each bolt 2 turns at a time in a crisscrosss pattern to avoid damage to the valves or rockers. Mark the caps so they can be replaced in their original position. 6. Lift the camshafts from the cylinder head, wipe them clean and inspect the lift ramps. Replace the camshafts and rockers if the lobes are pitted, scored or excessively worn. Fig. Fig. 3: Camshaft and valve components-1991-93 Integra 1.8L Fig. Fig. 4: Camshaft holder positioning and identification-1991-93 Integra 1.8L Fig. Fig. 5: Camshaft and valve components-1991-93 Integra 1.7L 7. Use Plasti-gauge ® to check bearing clearance: 0.002-0.004 in. (0.050-0.089mm) is standard clearance, 0.006 in. (0.15mm) service limit. If the clearance is too large and a new camshaft does not bring the clearance into specification, the cylinder head must be replaced. To install: 8. Check the following before installing the camshafts: A. Be certain the keyways on the camshafts are facing UP (No. 1 cylinder at TDC). B. The valve adjuster locknuts should be loosened and the adjusting screws backed off before installation. C. Replace the rocker arms in their original positions. 9. Place the rocker arms on the pivot bolts and the valve stems. 10. Install the camshafts with the seals part way on the camshaft, open side (spring) facing in. Lubricate the lip of the seal. 11. Do not apply oil to the holder mating surface of the camshaft seals. 12. Apply liquid gasket to the head mating surfaces of the No. 1 and No. 6 camshaft holders then install them along with the remaining holders. 13. Begin tightening the camshaft holder bolts, 2 turns at a time while making sure the rocker arms are positioned on the valve stems. Use a crisscrosss pattern when turning the bolts. 14. Using an oil seal driver tool 07947-SB00100 or equivalent, press new oil seals into the No. 1 camshaft holders. 15. Torque the bolts in the same pattern to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm) on 1986-90 models, 7 ft. lbs. (10 Nm) on 1991-93 1.8L engine models. On 1991-93 1.7L VTEC models, torque the 8mm bolts to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm) and the 6mm bolts to 8 ft. lbs. (11 Nm). Check that the rockers do not bind on the valves. 16. Install the camshaft pulley keys onto the grooves in the camshafts. 17. Push the camshaft pulleys onto the camshafts, then torque the retaining bolts to 27 ft. lbs. (38 Nm). 18. Install the timing belt, adjust the valves and pour oil over the camshafts before finishing the assembly. 1986-90 Legend See Figures 6, 7, 8 and 9 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Remove the timing belt covers and cylinder head covers. 2. Rotate the crankshaft to TDC of No. 1 piston and remove the timing belt. 3. Remove the camshaft sprockets. 4. To check camshaft end-play: A. Loosen the valve adjusters to remove as much spring tension as possible. B. Loosen the end bearing cap bolts 1 turn. C. Install the dial indicator. D. Push the camshaft fully towards the back of the head, zero the dial indicator and push the camshaft fully the other way to read end-play. E. End-play on a new camshaft should be 0.002-0.006 in. (0.05-0.15mm), 0.020 in. (0.5mm) is the service limit. 5. To remove the camshaft bearing caps, loosen each bolt 2 turns at a time in a crisscrosss pattern to avoid damage to the valves or rockers. Mark the caps so they can be replaced in their original position. 6. Lift the camshafts from the cylinder head, wipe them clean and inspect the lift ramps. Replace the camshafts and rockers if the lobes are pitted, scored or excessively worn. Fig. Fig. 6: Camshaft holder bolt torque sequence and specifications-1991-93 Integra 1.7L Fig. Fig. 7: Camshaft and bearing removal-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 8: Rocker arm and push rod removal-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 9: Camshaft bearing cap torque sequence-1986-90 Legend 7. Use Plasti-gauge ® to check bearing clearance: 0.002-0.004 in. (0.050-0.089mm) is standard clearance, 0.006 in. (0.15mm) service limit. If the clearance is too large and a new camshaft does not bring the clearance into specification, the cylinder head must be replaced. To install: 8. Fill the hydraulic lifter mounting holes with engine oil and install the lifters. Do not rotate the lifters while installing them. Also pour oil into the oil passages and fillers in the cylinder head. 9. With all the adjusting screws loose, install the pushrods and rocker arms in their original positions. 10. Advance the crankshaft 15 degrees, slip the camshaft seals onto the camshafts and lay the camshafts into the heads. Set the front camshaft so both valves on the No. 1 cylinder are be closed. Set the rear camshaft to make sure the No. 4 cylinder exhaust valve is closed. 11. Apply liquid gasket sealer to the camshaft oil seal mounting surface and on the end bearing cap-head contact surface. Install the caps in their original position and tighten each cap bolt 2 turns at a time in the sequence shown to draw the camshaft down evenly against the valve springs. 12. Make sure the oil seal is properly positioned and torque the bolts in 2 steps in sequence to 20 ft. lbs. (28 Nm). Torque the 6mm bolts last to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm). 13. Install the upper timing belt cover plate. 14. Install the camshaft pulleys and torque the bolts to 23 ft. lbs. (32 Nm). 15. Install the timing belt, adjust the valves and pour oil over the camshafts before completing the assembly. 1991-93 Legend and Vigor See Figures 10 through 15 Fig. Fig. 10: Camshaft holder bolt loosening sequence-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 11: Camshaft holder bolt torque sequence-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 12: Rocker arm and shaft assemblies-1991-93 Legend 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Remove the timing belt covers and cylinder head covers. 2. Rotate the crankshaft to TDC of No. 1 piston and remove the timing belt. 3. Remove the camshaft sprockets. 4. Loosen the rocker shaft holder bolts 1 turn at a time in the opposite of the installation sequence. This is the only way to avoid damaging the valves, camshafts or rocker assemblies. 5. After all bolts are loose, remove the rocker arm shafts as an assembly with the bolts still in the holders. 6. If the rocker shafts are to be disassembled, note that each rocker arm has a letter A or B stamped into the side. Before disassembling the rocker arms, make a note of the position of each letter so they can be reassembled the same way. On Vigor, the springs between the rocker arms are not all the same length. Carefully note their positions during disassembly. 7. On Legend, do not remove the hydraulic tappets from the rocker arms unless they are to be replaced. Handle the rocker arms carefully so the oil does not drain out of the tappets. 8. Lift the camshafts from the cylinder head, wipe them clean and inspect the lift ramps. Replace the camshafts and rockers if the lobes are pitted, scored or excessively worn. 9. To check camshaft end-play, reinstall the holders without the rocker arm assembly and torque the bolts in sequence. End-play should be 0.0020.006 in (0.05-0.15mm) on a new camshaft. The maximum service limit is 0.020 in. (0.5mm). 10. Use Plasti-gauge ® to check bearing clearance: 0.002-0.004 in. (0.050-0.089mm) is standard clearance, 0.006 in. (0.15mm) service limit. If the clearance is too large and a new camshaft does not bring the clearance into specification, the cylinder head must be replaced. To install: 11. Place a new camshaft seal on the end of the camshaft, lubricate the journals and set the camshaft in place on the head. 12. Apply liquid gasket to the mounting surfaces of the end camshaft holders. Fig. Fig. 13: Camshaft holder bolt removal sequence-Vigor Fig. Fig. 14: Camshaft holder bolt torque sequence-Vigor Fig. Fig. 15: Rocker shaft assemblies-Vigor 13. Set the rocker arm assemblies in place and start all the cam holder bolts. Make sure the rocker arms are properly positioned and turn each bolt in sequence 1 turn at a time until the holders are seated on the head. This is the only way to avoid damaging the valves or rocker assemblies. 14. When all the camshaft and rocker holders are seated, torque the bolts in the same sequence. Torque the 8mm bolts to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm) and the 6mm bolts to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm). 15. Install the camshaft pulleys and torque the bolts to 23 ft. lbs. (32 Nm). 16. Install the timing belt, adjust the valves and pour oil over the camshafts before completing the assembly. INSPECTION Degrease the camshaft using safe solvent, clean all oil grooves. Visually inspect the cam lobes and bearing journals for excessive wear. If a lobe is questionable, check all lobes and journals with a micrometer. Measure the lobes from nose to base and again at 90°. The lift is determined by subtracting the second measurement from the first. If all exhaust lobes and all intake lobes are not identical, the camshaft must be reground or replaced. Measure the bearing journals and compare to specifications. If a journal is worn there is a good chance that the cam bearings are worn too, requiring replacement. If the lobes and journals appear intact, place the front and rear cam journals in V-blocks and rest a dial indicator on the center journal. Rotate the camshaft to check for straightness, if deviation exceeds 0.025mm, replace the camshaft. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Crankshaft and Main Bearings REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print 1.6L, 2.5L (V6) and 2.7L Engines These engines use a main bearing cap and separate bridge assembly. THe bridge assembly serves as an added stiffener to the bottom of the engine. 1. Remove the engine from the vehicle and place it on a work stand. 2. Remove the crankshaft pulley attaching bolts and washer. 3. Remove the front cover and the air conditioning idler pulley assembly, if so equipped. Remove cover assembly. 4. Check the timing belt deflection. Remove the timing belt and sprockets. 5. Invert the engine on work stand. Remove the flywheel and the rear seal cover. Remove the oil pan and gasket. Remove the oil pump inlet and the oil pump assembly. 6. Ensure all bearing caps (main and connecting rod) are marked so they can be installed in their original positions. Turn the crankshaft until the connecting rod from which cap is being removed is up. Remove the connecting rod cap. Push the connecting rod and piston assembly up in the cylinder. Repeat the procedure for the remaining connecting rod assemblies. 7. Remove the main bearing caps. 8. Carefully lift crankshaft out of block so upper thrust bearing surfaces are not damaged. WARNING Handle the crankshaft with care to avoid possible fracture or damage to the finished surfaces. To install: If the bearings are to be reused they should be identified to ensure that they are installed in their original position. 9. Remove the main bearing inserts from the block and bearing caps. 10. Remove the connecting rod bearing inserts from connecting rods and caps. 11. Install a new rear oil seal in rear seal cover. 12. Apply a thin coat of Polyethylene Grease to the rear crankshaft surface. Do not apply sealer to the area forward of oil sealer groove. Inspect all the machined surfaces on the crankshaft for nicks, scratches or scores which could cause premature bearing wear. 13. If the crankshaft main bearing journals have been refinished to a definite undersize, install the correct undersize bearings. Ensure the bearing inserts and bearing bores are clean. Foreign material under the inserts will distort the bearing and cause a failure. 14. Place the upper main bearing inserts in position in the bores with the tang fitted in the slot provided. 15. Install the lower main bearings inserts in the bearing caps. 16. Carefully lower the crankshaft into place. 17. Check the clearance of each main bearing. Select fit the bearings for proper clearance. 18. After the bearings have been fitted, apply a light coat of heavy engine oil, SAE 50 weight to journals and bearings. Install all the bearing caps. The main bearing cap must be installed in their original positions. 19. Align the upper thrust bearing. 20. Check the crankshaft end play. 21. If the end play exceeds specification, replace the upper thrust bearing. If the end play is less than the specification, inspect the thrust bearing faces for damage, dirt or improper alignment. Install the thrust bearing and align the faces. Check the end-play. 22. Install the new bearing inserts in the connecting rods and caps. Check the clearance of each bearing. 23. If the bearing clearances are to specification, apply a light coat of heavy engine oil, SAE 50 weight to the journals and bearings. 24. Turn the crankshaft throw to the bottom of the stroke. Push the piston all the way down until the rod bearings seat on the crankshaft journal. 25. Install the connecting rod cap. 26. After the piston and connecting rod assemblies have been installed, check the connecting rod crankshaft journal. 27. Turn the engine on the work stand so the front end is up. Install the timing belt, sprockets, front cover, oil seal and the crankshaft pulley. 28. Clean the oil pan, oil pump and the oil pump screen assembly. 29. Prime the oil pump by filling the inlet opening with oil and rotating the pump shaft until oil emerges from the outlet opening. Install the oil pump. 30. Position the flywheel on the crankshaft. Install the attaching bolts. Tighten to specification. On the flywheel (manual transaxle only) locate clutch disc and install pressure plate. 31. Turn the engine on the work stand so the engine is in the normal upright position. Install the oil level dipstick. Install the accessory drive pulley, if so equipped. Install and adjust the drive belt and the accessory belts to specification. 32. Install either the clutch assembly or the torque converter. 33. Install the oil pan. 34. Remove the engine from work stand. Install the engine in the vehicle. 1.7L, 1.8L and 2.5L (5 Cylinder) Engines 1. Remove the engine assembly from the vehicle and install on a suitable workstand. 2. Remove the cylinder head, oil pan, oil pump and the flywheel. 3. Remove the piston and connecting rod assemblies. Refer to the procedure in this Section. 4. Remove the rear main seal housing. 5. Make sure the main bearing caps are numbered so they can be reinstalled in their original positions. Remove the bolts, then remove the bearing caps. 6. Lift the crankshaft from the cylinder block. 7. Inspect the crankshaft and bearings and repair and/or replace as necessary. To install: 8. After cleaning, inspecting and measuring the crankshaft and checking the main bearing clearance, install the crankshaft. Apply engine assembly lube or clean engine oil to the upper bearing shells prior to installation. 9. Apply engine assembly lube or clean engine oil to the lower bearing shells, then install the main bearing caps in their original positions. Tighten the bolts to the specification. 10. After each cap is tightened, check to see and feel that the crankshaft can be rotated by hand. If not, remove the bearing cap and check for the source of the interference. 11. Install the rear main seal housing and the flywheel. 12. Install the piston and connecting rod assemblies. 13. Install the oil pump and the oil pan. 14. Install the cylinder head. 15. Install the engine assembly in the vehicle. 3.2L Engines See Figures 1 through 8 1. Remove the engine assembly from the vehicle and install on a suitable workstand. 2. Remove the accessory drive belt, water pump belt, water pump and pump mounting bracket. 3. Remove the crankshaft damper and the timing chain cover. 4. Remove the timing chain and sprockets. 5. Remove the flywheel. Remove the oil pan and the oil pump and intermediate shaft assembly. 6. Make sure all connecting rod and main bearing caps are numbered so they can be reinstalled in their original positions. Turn the crankshaft until the connecting rod from which the cap is being removed is up, then remove the cap. 7. Install snug-fitting rubber hoses over the rod bolts, to prevent damaging the crankshaft, then push the piston and connecting rod assembly up in the cylinder. Repeat this procedure for the remaining piston and connecting rod assemblies. 8. Remove the main bearing caps. 9. Lift the crankshaft from the cylinder block. 10. Inspect the crankshaft and bearings and repair and/or replace as necessary. To install: 11. After cleaning, inspecting and measuring the crankshaft and checking the main and connecting rod bearing clearance, install the crankshaft. Apply engine assembly lube or clean engine oil to the upper main bearing shells prior to installation. 12. Apply engine assembly lube or clean engine oil to the lower bearing shells, then install the main bearing caps in their original positions. Apply RTV sealer to the rear main bearing cap parting line on the cylinder block. 13. Before tightening the main cap bolts, pry the crankshaft forward against the thrust surface of the upper thrust bearing shell. Hold the thrust bearing cap to the rear to align the thrust surfaces of both halves of the bearing. 14. Lubricate the upper connecting rod bearing shells with engine assembly lube or clean engine oil. Turn the crankshaft until the connecting rod journal is at the bottom of the stroke, then pull the piston and connecting rod assembly toward the journal until it is seated on the crankshaft. 15. Lubricate the lower connecting rod bearing shells with engine assembly lube or clean engine oil, then install the rod cap. Tighten the connecting rod nuts to specification. After all connecting rods have been installed on the crankshaft, check the connecting rod side clearance. 16. Install the timing chain, sprockets, timing cover and crankshaft damper. 17. Install a new rear main seal. 18. Clean the oil pan, oil pump and screen. Prime the oil pump by filling the inlet opening with oil and rotating the pump shaft until oil emerges from the outlet opening. Install the oil pump and intermediate shaft assembly. 19. Install the oil pan and the flywheel. 20. Install the water pump, pump mounting bracket, water pump belt and accessory drive belt. 21. Install the engine assembly in the vehicle. Fig. Fig. 1: Main bearing cap identification-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 2: Installing the main bearing bolts-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 3: Main bearing selection and identification-1986-90 Integra 1.6L Fig. Fig. 4: Crankshaft and main bearing installation-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 5: Main bearing cap identification and installation-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 6: Main bearing cap bolt torque sequence-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 7: Main bearing cap bolt loosening sequence-Vigor Fig. Fig. 8: Main bearing cap bolt torque sequence CLEANING AND INSPECTION 1. Clean the crankshaft with solvent and a brush. Clean the oil passages with a suitable brush, then blow them out with compressed air. 2. Inspect the crankshaft for obvious damage or wear. Check the main and connecting rod journals for cracks, scratches, grooves or scores. Inspect the crankshaft oil seal surface for nicks, sharp edges or burrs that could damage the oil seal or cause premature seal wear. 3. If the crankshaft passes a visual inspection, measure the main and connecting rod journals for wear, out-of-roundness or taper, using a micrometer. Measure in at least 4 places around each journal and compare your findings with the journal diameter specifications. 4. If equipped with a manual transaxle, check the fit of the clutch pilot bearing in the bore of the crankshaft. The bearing is pressed into the crankshaft and should not be loose. Inspect the inner surface of the bearing for wear or a bell-mouth condition. Check the inside diameter of the bearing for wear or damage. Check the bearing for roughness, evidence of overheating, or loss of lubricant and replace, as necessary. 5. Check journal runout using a dial indicator. Support the crankshaft in V-blocks and check the runout as shown. Compare to specifications. 6. If the crankshaft fails any inspection for wear or damage, it must be reground or replaced. BEARING REPLACEMENT See Figures 9 and 10 1. Inspect the bearings for scoring, chipping or other wear. 2. Inspect the crankshaft journals as detailed in the Cleaning and Inspection procedure. 3. If the crankshaft journals appear usable, clean them and the bearing shells until they are completely free of oil. Blow any oil from the oil hole in the crankshaft. The journal surfaces and bearing shells must be completely free of oil to get an accurate reading with Plastigage®. 4. Place a strip of Plastigage® lengthwise along the bottom center of the lower bearing shell, then install the cap with the shell and torque the connecting rod nuts or main cap bolts to specification. Do not turn the crankshaft with the Plastigage® installed in the bearing. 5. Remove the bearing cap with the shell. The flattened Plastigage® will either be sticking to the bearing shell or the crankshaft journal. 6. Using the printed scale on the Plastigage® package, measure the flattened Plastigage® at its widest point. The number on the scale that most closely corresponds to the width of the Plastigage® indicates the bearing clearance in thousandths of an inch or hundreths of a millimeter. 7. Compare your findings with the bearing clearance specification. If the bearing clearance is excessive, the bearing must be replaced or the crankshaft must be ground and the bearing replaced. If the crankshaft is still at standard size (has not been ground undersize), bearing shell sets of 0.001 in. , (0.0254mm) 0.002 in. (0.050mm) and 0.003 in. (0.0762mm) over standard size are available to correct excessive bearing clearance. 8. After clearance measuring is completed, be sure to remove the Plastigage® from the crankshaft and/or bearing shell. Fig. Fig. 9: Checking the crankshaft runout using a dial indicator 9. For final bearing shell installation, make sure the connecting rod and rod cap and/or cylinder block and main cap bearing saddles are clean and free of nicks or burrs. Install the bearing shells in the bearing saddles, making sure the bearing shell tangs are seated in the notches. Be careful when handling any plain bearings. Your hands and the working area should be clean. Dirt is easily embedded in the bearing surface and the bearings are easily scratched or damaged. 10. After all of the main bearing cap bolts have been tightened, mount a dial indicator on the end of the cylinder block with the indicator foot resting on the end of the crankshaft. Move the crankshaft back and forth with a prybar, being careful not to damage the crankshaft, bearings or cylinder block, and observe the dial indicator. Check the reading against the crankshaft end-play specification. If the end-play is excessive, it can be corrected using a thicker thrust bearing or by removing the crankshaft and welding and regrinding the thrust journal. Fig. Fig. 10: Checking the crankshaft for out-of-round and taper Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Cylinder Head REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print 1986-90 Integra See Figures 1 and 2 Cylinder head temperature must be below 100°F. Before removing the cylinder head check the following: Inspect the timing belt. Turn the flywheel so the No. 1 cylinder is at TDC. Mark all connectors and vacuum hoses before disconnecting them. 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. 2. Drain the cooling system. 3. Remove the air cleaner: A. Remove the air cleaner cover and filter. B. Disconnect the hot/cold air intake ducts and remove the air chamber hose. C. Remove the air cleaner. 4. Slowly loosen the service bolt on the top of the fuel filter about 1 turn to relieve the fuel system pressure. Disconnect the fuel return hose from the pressure regulator. CAUTION The fuel system may be under pressure and fuel will be sprayed. Be sure there is good ventilation and take the appropriate fire safety precautions. 5. Remove the brake booster vacuum tube from the intake manifold. 6. Remove the engine ground wire from the valve cover. Disconnect the throttle cable from the throttle body. 7. Disconnect the spark plug wires from the spark plugs and remove the distributor assembly. 8. Disconnect the hoses from the charcoal canister and from the No. 1 control box at the tubing manifold. 9. If equipped with air conditioning, disconnect the idle control solenoid hoses. 10. Disconnect the upper radiator heater and bypass hoses. 11. Disconnect the engine sub harness connectors and the following connectors from the cylinder head and the intake manifold: A. The 4 injector connectors. B. The TA sensor connector. C. The ground connector. D. The TW sensor connector. E. The throttle sensor connector. F. The crankshaft angle sensor connector. G. The EACV connector, if equipped. H. The CYL sensor connector, if equipped. 12. Remove the thermostat housing-to-intake manifold hose. 13. Unplug the oxygen sensor connector. 14. Remove the exhaust manifold bracket, the manifold bolts and the manifold. 15. Remove the bolts from the intake manifold and bracket. 16. Disconnect the breather chamber-to-intake manifold hose. 17. Remove the valve and upper timing belt covers. 18. Loosen the timing belt tensioner adjustment bolt and remove the belt. 19. Remove the lower timing belt cover bolts, the camshaft holder bolts, the camshaft holders, the camshafts and the rocker arms. 20. Remove the cylinder head bolts in the reverse order given in the head bolt torque sequence. 1 Unscrew the bolts /3of a turn each time and repeat the sequence to prevent cylinder head warpage. 21. Carefully, remove the intake manifold from the cylinder head and the cylinder head from the engine. 22. Clean the gasket mounting surfaces. Fig. Fig. 1: Cylinder head and valve train-1986-90 Integra Fig. Fig. 2: Cylinder head bolt torque sequence-1986-90 Integra To install: 23. Using new gaskets, install the intake manifold onto the cylinder head and torque the nuts to 23 ft. lbs. (32 Nm) in a crisscrosss pattern in 2-3 steps. 24. Install the cylinder head onto the engine block, after making sure the mating surface was cleaned and a new gasket was installed. Be sure to pay attention to the following points: A. Be sure the No. 1 cylinder is at TDC and the camshaft pulleys UP mark is on the top before positioning the head in place. B. The cylinder head dowel pins and oil control jet must be aligned. C. Torque the cylinder head bolts in 2 progressive steps and in the proper sequence. First to 22 ft. lbs. (30 Nm), in sequence, then to 48 ft. lbs. (67 Nm), in the same sequence. D. Use the longer bolt in the No. 9 position. 25. Make sure the keyways on the camshafts are facing up. The valve locknuts should be loosened and the adjusting screw backed off before installation. Replace the rocker arms in their original position. 26. Place the rocker arms on the pivot bolts and the valve stems. 27. Install the camshafts and the camshaft seals with the open side facing in. 28. Be sure to note the I and E marks that are stamped on the camshaft holders. Do not apply oil to the seal mating surface of the camshaft holders. 29. Apply a liquid gasket to the head of the mating surfaces of the No. 1 and No. 6 camshaft holders then install them, along with No. 2, 3, 4 and 5. Tighten each bolt 1 turn at a time to insure that the rockers do not bind on the valves. 30. Torque the camshaft holder bolts and make sure the rocker arms are properly positioned on the valve stems. Start at the center holders and work out towards the ends, torque the bolts to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm). 31. Press in the camshaft seal securely with a suitable seal driver. 32. Install the keys into their groves in the camshafts. To set the No. 1 piston at TDC, align the holes on the camshaft with the holes in the No. 1 camshaft holders and drive 5.0mm pin punches into the holes. 33. Push the camshaft pulleys onto the camshafts, then torque the retaining bolts to 27 ft. lbs. (38 Nm). 34. Install the timing belt and adjust the timing belt tension. Install the lower timing belt cover and bolts. 35. Install the upper timing belt covers and valve covers. 36. Reconnect the breather chamber-to-intake manifold hose. 37. Install the exhaust manifold, the manifold bolts and the manifold bracket. 38. Reconnect all disconnected electrical connections and vacuum lines. 39. Reconnect the upper radiator hose and bypass hoses. 40. Reinstall the distributor assembly and the spark plug wires to the spark plugs. 41. Install the engine ground wire from the valve cover. Reconnect the throttle cable from the throttle body. 42. Reinstall the air cleaner assembly and duct work that goes along with it. Reconnect the negative battery cable. 43. After installation, check to see that all hoses and wires are installed correctly. 44. Refill the coolant system. 45. Adjust the valve clearance. Make all other necessary adjustments It is recommended that after completing the cylinder head removal and installation, the engine oil should be changed. 1991-93 Integra See Figures 3 through 8 Cylinder head temperature must be below 100°F. Before removing the cylinder head check the following: Inspect the timing belt. Turn the flywheel so the No. 1 cylinder is at TDC. Mark all emission hoses before disconnecting them. 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. 2. Drain the cooling system. 3. Remove the air cleaner: A. Remove the air cleaner cover and filter. B. Disconnect the hot/cold air intake ducts and remove the air chamber hose. C. Remove the air cleaner. 4. Relieve the fuel pressure by slowly loosening the service bolt on the top of the fuel filter about a turn. CAUTION The fuel system may be under pressure and fuel will be sprayed. Be sure to take the appropriate safety and fire precautions. 5. Disconnect the fuel feed line. Remove the vacuum hose, breather hose and air intake hose. 6. Remove the water bypass hose from cylinder head. Remove the charcoal canister hose from the throttle body. 7. Remove the brake booster vacuum hose from the intake manifold. Remove the fuel return hose. Remove the PCV hose. 8. Remove the throttle cable from the throttle body. Take care not to bend the cable when removing it. Do not use pliers to remove the cable from the linkage. Always replaced a kinked cable with a new one. 9. Disconnect the ignition coil connector, TDC and crankshaft/cylinder sensor connector from the distributor. 10. Remove and tag the spark plug wirers. 11. Remove the emission control equipment bracket but do not disconnect the emission hoses. 12. Disconnect the 3 engine harness connectors on the left side of the engine compartment. 13. Disconnect the engine sub-harness connectors from the cylinder head and intake manifold. The connectors are as follows: A. Four injector connectors. B. TA sensor connector. C. Throttle angle sensor connector. D. EGR valve lift sensor; automatic transaxle only. E. Ground cable terminal. F. TW sensor ground. G. Coolant temperature gauge sender terminal. H. Oxygen sensor terminal. I. EACV connector. 14. Remove the upper radiator hose and heater inlet hose from the cylinder head. 15. Remove the power steering belt and power steering pump. Do not disconnect the hoses from the pump. 16. Raise and safely support the vehicle. 17. Remove the left front wheel and then remove the left splash shield. 18. Remove the intake manifold bracket bolts and remove the exhaust manifold upper shroud. 19. Remove the exhaust manifold bracket. Remove front exhaust pipe and remove the exhaust manifold. 20. Remove the valve cover and engine ground cable. 21. Remove the timing belt middle cover. Loosen but do not remove the adjusting bolt and release the timing belt tension. Tighten the bolt to hold the tensioner in the released position. 22. Remove the timing belt from the driven pulleys. Be sure not to crimp or bend the timing belt more then 90 degrees in less then 1 in. (25mm) in diameter. 23. Remove the camshaft driven pulleys. Loosen all the camshaft holder bolts 1 full turn at a time to release valve spring pressure evenly. Remove the camshaft holder bolts, then remove the camshaft holders, camshafts and rocker arms. Fig. Fig. 3: Cylinder head and valve train-1991-93 Integra 1.8L Fig. Fig. 4: Cylinder head bolt loosening sequence-1991-93 Integra 1.8L Fig. Fig. 5: Cylinder head bolt torque sequence-1991-93 Integra 1.8L Fig. Fig. 6: Cylinder head and valve train-1991-93 Integra 1.7L Fig. Fig. 7: Cylinder head bolt loosening sequence-1991-93 Integra 1.7L Fig. Fig. 8: Cylinder head bolt torque sequence-1991-93 Integra 1.7L 24. Remove the cylinder head bolts and remove the cylinder head. To prevent warpage, unscrew all the cylinder head bolts in sequence 1 / 3 turn at a time, repeat this sequence until all the bolts are loosened. 25. Remove the intake manifold from the cylinder head. To install: 26. Use new gaskets and install the intake manifold onto the cylinder head and tighten the nuts in a crisscrosss pattern in 2-3 steps, beginning in the middle. Torque the nuts to 17 ft. lbs. (23 Nm). 27. Install the cylinder head onto the engine block, after making sure the mating surface was cleaned and a new gasket was installed. Be sure to pay attention to the following points: A. Be sure the No. 1 cylinder is at TDC and the camshaft pulley UP mark is on the top before positioning the head in place. B. The cylinder head dowel pins and oil control jet must be aligned. C. Torque the cylinder head bolts, in 2 progressive steps: First to 22 ft. lbs. (30 Nm), in sequence, then to 61 ft. lbs. (85 Nm), in the same sequence. This sequence is the same as on earlier Integra engines. D. Apply engine oil to the cylinder head bolts and washers. Use the longer bolt in the No. 1 and No. 2 positions. 28. Make sure the keyways on the camshafts are facing up. The valve locknuts should be loosened and the adjusting screw backed off before installation. Replace the rocker arms in their original position. 29. Place the rocker arms on the pivot bolts and the valve stems. 30. Install the camshafts and the camshaft seals with the open spring side facing in. 31. Be sure to note the I and E marks that are stamped on the camshaft holders. Do not apply oil to the seal mating surface of the camshaft holders. 32. Apply a liquid gasket to the head of the mating surfaces of the No. 1 and No. 6 camshaft holders then install them, along with No. 2, 3, 4 and 5. Tighten each bolt 1 turn at a time to insure that the rockers do not bind on the valves. 33. Torque the camshaft holder bolts and make sure the rocker arms are properly positioned on the valve stems. Start at the center holders and work out towards the ends, torque the bolts to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm). 34. Press in the camshaft seal securely with a suitable seal driver. 35. Install the keys into their groves in the camshafts. To set the No. 1 piston at TDC, align the holes on the camshaft with the holes in the No. 1 camshaft holders and drive 5.0mm pin punches into the holes. 36. Push the camshaft pulleys onto the camshafts, then torque the retaining bolts to 27 ft. lbs. (38 Nm). 37. Install the timing belt and adjust the tension. Install the lower and middle timing belt covers and bolts. 38. Install the valve cover and engine ground cable. 39. Install the exhaust manifold and torque the nuts to 23 ft. lbs. (32 Nm). Install the bracket and upper shroud and attach the exhaust pipe. 40. Install the left front wheel splash shield and the left front wheel. Lower the vehicle. 41. Install the power steering pump and drive belt. 42. Reconnect all disconnected electrical connections and vacuum lines. 43. Reconnect the upper radiator hose and heater inlet hose. 44. Reinstall the spark plug wires to the spark plugs. 45. Install the engine ground wire to the valve cover. Reconnect the throttle cable from the throttle body. 46. Reinstall the air cleaner assembly and duct work that goes along with it. Reconnect the negative battery cable. 47. After installation, check to see that all hoses and wires are installed correctly. 48. Refill the coolant system. 49. Adjust the valve clearance. Make all other necessary adjustments It is recommended that after completing the cylinder head removal and installation, the engine oil should be changed. 1986-90 Legend See Figures 9 and 10 The cylinder head temperature must be below 100°F. Before removing the cylinder head check the following: Inspect the timing belt. Turn the flywheel so the No. 1 cylinder is at TDC. Mark all wiring and emission hoses before disconnecting them. 1. Disconnect the battery ground cable. 2. Drain the cooling system. 3. Remove the vacuum hose from the brake booster. 4. Remove the secondary ground cable from the cylinder head and the transaxle housing. 5. Disconnect the radio noise condenser connector, ignition coil wire and the ignition primary connector. 6. Remove the air cleaner cover. 7. Relieve the fuel pressure by loosening the service bolt on the top of the fuel filter about a turn. Disconnect the fuel return hose from the pressure regulator. Remove the special nut and the fuel hose. CAUTION The fuel system may be under pressure and fuel will be sprayed. Be sure there is good ventilation and take the appropriate fire safety precautions. 8. Disconnect the throttle cable from the throttle valve. 9. Disconnect the charcoal canister hose from the throttle valve. 10. Disconnect the engine sub harness connectors from the cylinder head and the intake manifold: A. The 6 injector connectors. B. The TA sensor connector. C. The temperature unit connector. D. The ground connector from the fuel pipe. E. The TW sensor connector. F. The throttle sensor connector. G. The crankshaft angle sensor connector. H. EGR valve connector. I. The 4 wire harness clamps. 11. Disconnect the oxygen sensor coupler. 12. Disconnect the cooling system hoses from the cylinder head. Remove the hose between the water passage and the intake manifold. Disconnect the connecting pipe to the valve body hose and bypass outlet hose. 13. Disconnect the spark plug wires from the spark plugs and remove the distributor assembly. 14. Remove the intake manifold cover from the intake manifold. 15. Remove the wire harness cover. 16. Remove the alternator pulley cover. 17. Remove the alternator and belt. 18. Remove the power steering pump and disconnect the pump hoses. Also, remove the hose clamp bolt on the body. 19. Disconnect the idle boost solenoid hoses. 20. Remove the cruise control actuator. 21. Remove the exhaust header pipe and pull it clear of the exhaust manifold. 22. Remove the air cleaner base mount bolts and disconnect the hose from the intake manifold to the breather chamber. 23. Remove the air cleaner base from the intake manifold. 24. Remove the EGR tube nuts from the cylinder head. 25. Remove the exhaust manifold cover nuts. 26. Remove the air suction tube nuts from the exhaust manifold and air suction valve. 27. Remove the intake manifold assembly from the cylinder head. 28. Remove the water passage assembly from the front and rear of the cylinder head. 29. Remove the timing belt upper covers. 30. Loosen the tensioner adjustment bolt and remove the timing belt. Advance the crankshaft by 15 degrees before removing the timing belt to prevent interference between the piston and the valve. 31. Remove the front and rear camshaft pulleys using the following procedure: A. Before removing the rear pulley, adjust the cam position so no valve is fully open. B. Remove the pulley mounting bolts with a universal holder and a double-end wrench. For the rear pulley, first, remove the top 2 bolts and then the remaining bolt. 32. Remove the upper cover back plates. 33. Remove the valve covers and the head side covers. 34. Remove the bearing cap oil pipes, the bearing caps and the camshaft. 35. Remove the intake and exhaust inside rocker arms and pushrods. Label all valve train components to ensure installation in their proper locations. 36. Remove the cylinder head bolts and remove the head. 1 Unscrew the cylinder head bolts /4of a turn in the reverse order of the torque sequence until loose to prevent warpage to the cylinder head. 37. Clean the gasket mounting surfaces. Fig. Fig. 9: Cylinder head and valve train-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 10: Cylinder head bolt torque sequence-1986-90 Legend To install: 38. Use new gaskets and install the exhaust manifold onto the cylinder head and tighten the bolts in a crisscrosss pattern in 2-3 steps. 39. Install the cylinder head onto the engine block, after making sure the mating surface was cleaned and a new gasket was installed. Be sure to pay attention to the following points: A. Be sure the No. 1 cylinder is at TDC and the camshaft pulleys UP mark is on the top before positioning the head in place. B. The cylinder head dowel pins and oil control jet must be aligned. C. Torque the cylinder head bolts, in 2 progressive steps: First to 29 ft. lbs. (40 Nm), in sequence, then to 56 ft. lbs. (78 Nm), in the same sequence. 40. Pour engine oil into the cylinder head hydraulic tappet mounting hole, up to the level of the oil path. 41. Install the hydraulic tappet into the cylinder head. Do not rotate the hydraulic tappet while inserting it into the head. 42. Pour engine oil into the oil fillers on the cylinder head. 43. Install the pushrods and rocker arms. Be sure to install each part in its original position. Loosen the rocker arm adjusting screws and locknuts before installation. 44. Install the camshafts and camshaft oil seals. Be sure to take note of the locations of the camshafts; the front camshaft has a groove for driving the distributor. A. Make sure the camshaft is mounted parallel with the rocker arm slipper surface. B. Advance the crankshaft by 15 degrees from the No. 1 cylinder TDC of compression stroke to prevent interference between the piston and valve. C. Place the rear camshaft on the cylinder head at the position where the cam is not pushing the valve. D. Preset the oil seal, with its spring side facing inward. E. Install the rear camshaft sealing rubber. Do not apply oil to the cam holder side of the oil seal. 45. Apply liquid gasket to the camshaft oil seal mounting surface and on the head contact surface. Finger tighten the bearing caps. 46. Carefully fit the camshaft oil seal until it contacts the bearing cap. Torque the bearing cap bolts in 2 steps to 20 ft. lbs. (28 Nm) in the sequence shown. Make sure the oil seal is properly positioned and torque those bolts last to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm). 47. Install the upper timing cover plate. Install the camshaft pulley and torque the bolts to 23 ft. lbs. (32 Nm). Install the timing belt. 48. Install the water passage assembly from the front and rear of the cylinder head. 49. Install the intake manifold assembly and torque the bolts to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). 50. Install the air suction tube nuts to the exhaust manifold and air suction valve. 51. Install the exhaust manifold cover nuts. 52. Install the EGR tube nuts to the cylinder head. 53. Install the air cleaner base to the intake manifold. 54. Install the air cleaner base mount bolts and reconnect the hose from the intake manifold to the breather chamber. 55. Install the exhaust header pipe to the exhaust manifold. 56. Install the cruise control actuator. 57. Reconnect the idle boost solenoid hoses. 58. Install the power steering pump and reconnect the pump hoses. Also, install the hose clamp bolt on the body. 59. Install the alternator and belt. 60. Install the alternator pulley cover. 61. Install the wire harness cover. 62. Install the intake manifold cover to the intake manifold. 63. Install the distributor assembly and reconnect the spark plug wires to the spark plugs. 64. Reconnect the cooling system hoses to the cylinder head. Install the hose between the water passage and the intake manifold. Reconnect the connecting pipe to the valve body hose and bypass outlet hose. 65. Reconnect the oxygen sensor and all disconnected electrical connections. 66. Reconnect the charcoal canister hose to the throttle valve. 67. Reconnect the throttle cable to the throttle valve. 68. Install all disconnected fuel lines. Install the air cleaner cover. 69. Install the secondary ground cable to the cylinder head and the transaxle housing. 70. Install the vacuum hose to the brake booster. 71. Refill the cooling system. 72. Reconnect the battery ground cable. 73. Readjust the exhaust valves: A. With the engine at TDC on No. 1 cyl., adjust cyl. 1, 2, and 4. B. Turn the valve adjusting screw until it contacts the valve, then an additional 1.5 turns. C. Turn the engine to TDC on No. 5 cyl. and adjust cyl. 3, 5, and 6. 74. After the heads are reassembled, make sure the engine sits for approximately 5 minutes to allow the hydraulic tappets to reach the proper oil level. 75. Remove the spark plugs and crank the engine, feel for compression at each cylinder at the spark plug holes. It may be necessary to crank the engine through several cycles to confirm compression. 76. If any cylinder does not have compression, it may be necessary to disassemble the head and check the suspected tappet. 77. If all cylinders have compression, reinstall the plugs and start the engine. 1991-93 Legend See Figures 11, 12 and 13 The cylinder head temperature must be below 100°F. Before removing the cylinder head check the following: Inspect the timing belt. Turn the flywheel so the No. 1 cylinder is at TDC. Mark all wiring and emission hoses before disconnecting them. 1. Remove the battery and battery box. 2. Drain the cooling system. 3. Remove the vacuum hose from the brake booster. 4. Remove the secondary ground cable from the cylinder head and block. 5. Remove the air cleaner and ducting. 6. Relieve the fuel pressure by loosening the service bolt on the top of the fuel filter about a turn. Disconnect the fuel return hose from the pressure regulator. Remove the special nut and the fuel hose. CAUTION The fuel system may be under pressure and fuel will be sprayed. Be sure there is good ventilation and take the appropriate fire safety precautions. 7. Disconnect the throttle cable from the throttle valve. 8. Disconnect the charcoal canister hose from the throttle valve. 9. Disconnect the wiring and remove the main fuse box. 10. Remove the injector resistor and the connector. 11. Unplug the connectors and remove the ignition coils. 12. Remove the engine wire harness covers and disconnect the following: A. The 6 injector connectors. B. The TA sensor connector. C. The temperature unit connector. D. The ground connector from the fuel pipe. E. The TW sensor connector. F. The EGR valve connector. G. The knock sensor. H. The crankshaft angle/cylinder sensor connector. 13. Remove the air inlet pipe and vacuum pipes and hoses. 14. Disconnect the throttle sensor, oil pressure switch, oxygen sensors and engine ground terminals and remove the wiring harness. 15. Remove the intake manifold. 16. Remove the upper timing belt covers. 17. Do not remove the timing belt adjuster bolt. Loosen it 1 / 2 turn, relieve the belt tension and tighten the bolt. 18. Remove the camshaft timing belt and the camshaft pulleys. 19. Remove the timing belt cover plates from the heads and remove the crank angle/cylinder sensor from the left head. 20. Remove the cylinder head covers. 21. Remove the bolts from the alternator and power steering pump brackets as required. 22. Remove the self locking nuts from the exhaust manifolds and slip the manifolds off. If necessary, remove the camshafts. 23. Loosen each head bolt about 1 / 2 turn in the opposite of the installation sequence. This is important to prevent warping the heads. Repeat until all bolts are loose and the head can be removed. Fig. Fig. 11: Cylinder head and valve train-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 12: Cylinder head bolt loosening sequence-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 13: Cylinder head bolt torque sequence-1991-93 Legend To install: 24. It is easier to install the exhaust manifolds and their covers onto the heads before installing the heads to the engine. Use new gaskets and selflocking nuts and torque to 25 ft. lbs. (34 Nm). 25. Install the heads with new gaskets and O-rings, making sure the dowel pins and control orifices are properly positioned. Oil the threads and washers on the head bolts and torque in 2 steps in the sequence shown to 56 ft. lbs. (78 Nm). 26. Apply liquid gasket to the corners of the camshaft holders and install the cylinder head covers. 27. Install the crankshaft/cylinder sensor to the left cylinder head, then install both timing belt cover plates. 28. Install the camshaft pulleys and torque the bolts to 23 ft. lbs. (32 Nm). There is a left and right pulley; the left one goes with the crankshaft/cylinder sensor. 29. Align the timing marks on the crankshaft and camshaft pulleys, install the timing belt and adjust the belt tension. Install the timing belt covers. 30. Install the intake manifold with new gaskets. Torque the 6mm bolts to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm) and the 8mm bolts to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). Connect the cooling system hoses. 31. Install the air suction, EGR, vacuum and air inlet pipes. Reconnect the vacuum and fuel system hoses, using new gaskets on the fuel supply hose. 32. Connect the sensor wiring and install the wiring harness for the injection and ignition systems. 33. Install the fuse box and connect the wiring. 34. Connect the throttle cable and refill the cooling system. 35. Make sure all other wires and hoses are properly connected and install the battery. Before starting the engine, turn the ignition switch ON and OFF a number of times to pressurize the fuel system. Check for leaks. 36. After starting the engine, bleed the cooling system. Vigor See Figures 14, 15 and 16 The radio is equipped with a theft protection program. Be sure the 5 digit security code is available before disconnecting the battery. 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable and drain the coolant. 2. Remove the fuel filler cap and loosen the service bolt on the fuel filter banjo bolt to relieve the fuel system pressure. Remove the banjo bolt to remove the fuel feed hose from the fuel filter. Remove the fuel return hose from the pressure regulator. CAUTION The fuel system may be under pressure and fuel will be sprayed. Be sure there is good ventilation and take the appropriate fire safety precautions. 3. Remove the intake air duct and air cleaner assembly. 4. Remove the throttle cable by loosening the locknut, then slip the cable end out of the throttle bracket and accelerator linkage. Take care not to bend the cable when removing it. Unbolt the throttle cable clamp and move the cable aside. 5. Label and disconnect the fuel and vacuum hoses from the intake manifold. 6. Disconnect the heater hoses and the brake booster hose. 7. Disconnect the wiring from the ignition coil and the ground wire. 8. Remove the ABS motor relay box and the battery heat shield. 9. Remove the 2 bolts to remove the distributor. Be careful not to drop the collar behind the distributor. 10. Label and disconnect all the wiring from the cylinder head. 11. Disconnect the remaining coolant hoses from the intake manifold. 12. Remove the intake manifold support brackets. The manifold will be removed after removing the cylinder head. 13. Remove the oxygen sensor. 14. Remove the exhaust manifold heat shields and disconnect the exhaust pipe from the manifold. 15. Remove the support bracket and remove the exhaust manifold. 16. Remove the cylinder head cover and the upper timing belt cover. 17. Rotate the crankshaft to bring No. 1 piston to TDC on the compression stroke. The camshaft sprocket is equipped with TDC marks that align with the edge of the cylinder head. 18. Inspect the condition of the belt. If it is not being replaced, use paint to matchmark the belt to the sprocket for reassembly. 19. Loosen the belt tension adjuster bolt and push the tensioner against the spring to release the tension on the camshaft belt, then tighten the bolt again. Carefully slide the belt off the camshaft sprocket. 20. Loosen each cylinder head bolt about 1 / 2 turn in the opposite of the installation sequence. This is important to prevent warping the head. Repeat until all bolts are loose and can be removed. 21. If the cylinder head is stuck to the block, there are pry points near the No. 9 and No. 11 cylinder head bolts. Do not pry against the gasket surfaces. 22. After removing the cylinder head, remove the intake manifold. Fig. Fig. 14: Cylinder head and valve train-Vigor Fig. Fig. 15: Cylinder head bolt loosening sequence-Vigor Fig. Fig. 16: Cylinder head bolt torque sequence-Vigor To install: 23. Make sure the cylinder head and the engine block sealing surfaces are flat. Repair or replace as required. Clean all gasket surfaces and run a tap through the bolt holes in the block to clean the threads. 24. Fit a new O-ring onto the oil control orifice and install the orifice and dowel pins onto the block. Lay the new head gasket in place. 25. Install the intake manifold onto the cylinder head with a new gasket. Torque the nuts in a crisscross pattern in 2 steps to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). 26. Make sure the crankshaft and camshaft are both at TDC for No. 1 piston and fit the cylinder head to the block. Make sure the oil control orifice is properly aligned. 27. Lightly oil the threads and washer surfaces of the cylinder head bolts and install them. Torque the bolts in 3 steps to 72 ft. lbs. (100 Nm) in the correct sequence. 28. Install the intake manifold brackets. 29. Loosely install the exhaust manifold bracket onto the manifold. Install the exhaust manifold with a new gasket and new self-locking nuts and torque the nuts to 23 ft. lbs. (32 Nm). 30. Connect the exhaust pipe and install the manifold shields. 31. Install the oxygen sensor. 32. If the crankshaft was not turned while the engine was apart and there is a matchmark on the timing belt and camshaft pulley, make sure the marks are aligned and slide the belt onto the camshaft sprocket. If the engine has been disturbed and the matchmark is not usable: A. Align the white TDC mark on the crankshaft pulley with the pointer on the lower belt cover. Rotate the crankshaft slowly. If it stops, a piston is contacting the valves. Turn the camshaft to move the valves and try again. B. On the camshaft sprocket, make sure the UP mark is up and align the TDC marks with the edge of the cylinder head. C. Install the timing belt with no slack between the camshaft and crankshaft sprockets. D. To adjust the belt tension, loosen the tensioner bolt, turn the crankshaft counterclockwise about 1 / 4 turn, then tighten the bolt again. Rotate the crankshaft 2 full turns and make sure the timing marks and the TDC mark align properly. 33. Adjust the valves. 34. Apply silicone sealer to the ends of the cylinder head near the camshaft holders. Install the cylinder head cover with new rubber seals as required. 35. Install the timing belt covers. 36. Connect all wiring, hoses, vacuum lines and control cables. Adjust as required. 37. Change the oil and refill all fluids. Run the engine to bleed the cooling system and check for leaks. CLEANING AND INSPECTION See Figures 17, 18 and 19 Although cylinder head service can be performed by most do it yourself mechanics, some operations are best performed by a competent machine shop. 1. Refer to "Valves, Removal and Installation" in this section and remove the valve assemblies from the cylinder head. 2. Using a small wire power brush, clean the carbon from the combustion chambers and the valve ports. Fig. Fig. 17: Checking the cylinder head for flatness Fig. Fig. 18: Check the cylinder head in all of these directions to get the best measurement Fig. Fig. 19: Checking valve stem-to-guide clearance using a dial indicator 3. Inspect the cylinder head for cracks in the exhaust ports, combustion chambers or external cracks in the water chamber. 4. Thoroughly clean the valve guides using a suitable wire bore brush. Excessive valve stem-to-bore clearance will cause excessive oil consumption and may cause valve breakage. Insufficient clearance will result in noisy and sticky functioning of the valve and disturb engine smoothness. 5. Measure the valve stem clearance as follows: A. Clamp a dial indicator on one side of the cylinder head rocker arm cover gasket rail. B. Locate the indicator so movement of the valve stem from side-to-side (crosswise to the head) will cause a direct movement of the indicator stem. The indicator stem must contact the side of the valve stem just above the valve guide. C. Prop the valve head about 1/16 in. off the valve seat. D. Move the stem of the valve from side-to-side using light pressure to obtain a clearance reading. If the clearance exceeds specifications, it will be necessary to ream (for original valves) the valve guides. 6. Inspect the rocker arm studs for wear or damage. 7. Install a dial micrometer into the valve guide and check the valve seat for concentricity. RESURFACING 1. Using a straight edge and feeler gauge, check the cylinder for warpage. 2. If the warpage exceeds 0.002 inch over the total length, the cylinder head must be resurfaced. Resurfacing can be performed at most machine shops. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Engine Assembly REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print 1986-1989 Integra See Figures 1 and 2 On these vehicles, the engine and transaxle are removed as a unit. The lower ball joints and the inner CV-joints will be separated but not removed. 1. Disconnect the battery cables from the battery; negative cable first. Remove the battery and the battery tray from the engine compartment, if necessary. 2. Using a scratch awl, scribe a line where the hood brackets meet the inside of the hood; this will help realign the hood during the installation. Disconnect and remove the washer fluid tube(s). Remove the hood-to-hinge bolts and the hood. 3. Raise and safely support the vehicle. Remove the engine and wheel well splash shields. 4. Drain the oil from the engine, the coolant from the radiator and the fluid from the transaxle. 5. Remove the following items: A. The engine air intake ducts. B. The coil wire and spark plug wires. C. The throttle control cable. D. The cruise control throttle cable. E. The clutch cable. 6. Relieve the fuel pressure by slowly loosening the service bolt on the top of the fuel filter. CAUTION The fuel system may be under pressure and fuel will be sprayed. Be sure there is good ventilation and take the appropriate fire safety precautions. 7. Remove the banjo bolt and disconnect the fuel hose from the filter. 8. Label and disconnect the engine compartment sub-harness wiring connectors. 9. Most of the vacuum hoses lead to an emissions control equipment box or panel on the firewall. Rather than disconnecting the hoses, it may be easier to disconnect the wiring, remove the box or panel and lay it on the engine. All other vacuum hoses can be labeled and disconnected. 10. Loosen the throttle cable locknut and adjusting nut, then, slip the cable end out of the throttle bracket and remove it. 11. Without disconnecting the hydraulic lines, remove the power steering pump and secure it to the body out of the way. 12. If equipped with an automatic transaxle, working inside the vehicle, remove the center console. Move the shift lever to the R position and remove the lock pin to separate the shift cable. 13. If equipped with a manual transaxle, at the firewall, slide the spring pin retainer towards the front of the vehicle. Use an 8mm pin punch to drive the spring pin out to separate the shift rod. 14. Label the heater hoses and disconnect the heater and radiator hoses from the engine. 15. On vehicles equipped with automatic transaxle, disconnect the oil cooler hoses from the Transaxle and allow the fluid to drain from the hoses. Secure the hoses to the body near the radiator. 16. Disconnect the upper and lower radiator hoses and the wiring for the switches and fans. Remove the bolts and remove the radiator and fans as an assembly. 17. Remove the speedometer cable clip and pull the cable from the holder. Do not remove the holder from the transaxle as it may cause the speedometer gear to fall into the transaxle. 18. If equipped with air conditioning, loosen the drive belt adjusting bolts and remove the belt. Without disconnecting the hoses, remove the compressor and secure it to the body. Remove the lower compressor mounting bracket. Do not loosen or disconnect the air conditioning freon lines. Do not vent freon into the air. 19. Disconnect the alternator wiring harness connector. Remove the adjusting bolt and the alternator belt. Remove the mount bolt, bracket and the alternator. 20. Disconnect the exhaust pipe from the manifold. 21. Remove the cotter pin and nut from the ball joints. Using a ball joint puller, separate the ball joint from the front hub. 22. Using a small prybar, pry out the inboard CV-joint approximately 1 / 2 in. (13mm) in order to release the spring clip from the groove in the differential. Pull the steering knuckle assembly outward. Pull the halfshaft from the transaxle case. Secure the halfshafts out of the way. Do not let them hang or the outer CV-joint will be damaged. 23. Attach a lifting sling to the engine block and raise the engine slightly to remove the slack from the chain. 24. Remove the rear transaxle mount and the bolts from the front transaxle mount and the engine side mount. Fig. Fig. 1: Engine mount locations-1986-90 Vigor Fig. Fig. 2: Engine mount torque specifications-1986-90 Integra 25. Check that the engine and transaxle are free from any hoses or electrical connectors. Slowly raise the engine up and out of the vehicle. To install: 26. Carefully fit the engine and transmission into the vehicle. Be careful not to damage any hoses or electrical connectors. 27. Loosely install the rear transaxle mount and the bolts for the front transaxle mount and the engine side mount. Tighten the bolts in 2 steps in the sequence shown. This is important to help minimize vibration. 28. Fit the halfshafts into place. Use new spring clips and be sure the CV-joints click into place. 29. Reconnect the ball joints and torque the nut to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm). Install a new cotter pin. 30. Connect the exhaust pipe with new self locking nuts and torque to 40 ft. lbs. (55 Nm). 31. Reinstall the alternator and the air conditioning compressor. 32. Install the drive belts and adjust the belt tension. 33. Install the speedometer cable. 34. Install the radiator assembly, coolant hoses, heater hoses and oil cooler lines. 35. Connect the shift linkage and adjust the clutch cable. 36. Install the power steering pump and drive belts. Install the throttle cable bracket and throttle cable. 37. Install the control box or panel to the firewall. Reconnect all disconnected vacuum lines and electrical connectors. 38. Make sure all hoses, wires and control cables are properly connected and adjusted. 39. Install the battery box, battery and battery cables. When installing the hood, be sure to line the hood up with the scribe marks made during the removal procedure. 40. Install the wheel well and engine splash shields. 41. Refill the coolant system, engine oil and transaxle fluid. Start the engine, bleed the cooling system and make all necessary adjustments. 1990-93 Integra See Figures 3, 4 and 5 On these vehicles, the engine and transaxle are removed as a unit. The lower ball joints and the inner CV-joints will be separated but not removed. 1. Raise and safely support the vehicle. Remove the engine and wheel well splash shields. 2. Disconnect the battery cables from the battery, negative cable first. Remove the battery and the battery tray from the engine compartment. 3. It is not necessary to remove the hood. Raise it to a full vertical position and support it properly. 4. Drain the oil from the engine, the coolant from the radiator and the fluid from the transaxle. 5. Remove the intake air duct and air cleaner assembly. 6. Remove the fuel filler cap and loosen the service bolt on the fuel filter banjo bolt to relieve the fuel pressure. Disconnect the fuel feed hose from the fuel filter and the fuel return hose from the pressure regulator. CAUTION The fuel system may be under pressure and fuel will be sprayed. Be sure there is good ventilation and take the appropriate fire safety precautions. 7. Disconnect the charcoal canister hose from the throttle body. Vehicles with automatic transaxle have an emissions control equipment box on the firewall. Rather than disconnecting the vacuum hoses, it may be easier to unplug the connectors, remove the box from the firewall and lay it on the engine. 8. Remove the ground cable from the transaxle. Disconnect the 2 distributor electrical connectors, make an alignment mark on the distributor body and the engine and remove the distributor. 9. Remove the throttle cable by loosening the locknut, then slip the cable end out of the throttle bracket and accelerator linkage. Take care not to bend the cable when removing it. Do not use pliers to remove the cable from the linkage. 10. Remove the mounting bolts and the V-belt for the power steering pump, then without disconnecting the hoses, secure the pump out of the way. 11. Near the brake booster, disconnect the engine wiring harness connectors and remove the wire from the clamp. 12. Remove the brake booster vacuum hose from the intake manifold. Disconnect the upper and lower radiator hoses and heater hoses. 13. Without disconnecting the hydraulic hoses or cable, remove the bolt to remove the speed sensor from the transaxle as an assembly. 14. Disconnect the transaxle cooling hoses, if equipped, and unplug the radiator fan connectors. Remove the radiator and fans as an assembly. 15. If not already removed, remove the driver's side splash shield at the wheel well. 16. If equipped with air conditioning, remove the belt. Remove the compressor with the hoses still attached and secure the compressor to the front beam. Do not loosen or disconnect the air conditioning freon lines. Do not vent freon into the air. 17. To disconnect the halfshafts, the lower damper fork and ball joint must be disconnected, allowing the steering knuckle to move away from the transaxle. A. With the front wheels removed, remove the damper fork nut and pinch bolt. Remove the damper fork from the lower arm. B. Remove the lower ball joint castle nut press the ball joint out of the lower arm using a suitable puller, with the puller jaws grasping the lower arm. C. Carefully pry the inner CV-joint away from the Transaxle to force the set ring at the inner end past the groove. D. Pull the inboard CV-joint, not the halfshaft, and remove the CV-joint out of the intermediate shaft. Do not pull on the halfshaft, as the CV-joint may come apart. Use care when prying out the assembly and pull it straight to avoid damaging the intermediate shaft seals. 5. Support the halfshafts or hang them from the body with wire. Do not let them hang from the outer CV-joint or it will be damaged. 18. Disconnect the alternator wiring harness connector. Remove the alternator belt, the mount bolts, the alternator and the mounting bracket. 19. Remove the front exhaust pipe. 20. If equipped with a manual transaxle, perform the following procedures: A. Disconnect the clutch cable. Avoid using pliers to remove the cable from the linkage. B. To disconnect the shift linkage rod, push back the boot and drive out the pin securing the shift rod universal joint to the transaxle. Use a new pin when reassembling. C. Remove the shift lever torque rod. 21. If equipped with an automatic transaxle, remove the torque converter cover. Remove the cable holder, cotter pin and control pin, then remove the shift control cable. Take care not to bend the cable when removing it. Avoid using pliers to remove the cable from the linkage. 22. Attach a suitable lifting device to the engine. Raise the engine slightly to remove all the slack from the lifting device. 23. Remove the rear transaxle mount and rear transaxle mounting bracket. Fig. Fig. 3: Engine mount locations-1991-93 Integra Fig. Fig. 4: Engine mount torque sequence and specifications-1991-93 Integra Fig. Fig. 5: Additional engine torque specifications-1991-93 Integra 24. Remove the front transaxle mount. Remove the side transaxle mounting bracket. Remove the side engine mount. 25. Check that the engine/transaxle assembly is completely free of all vacuum hoses and electrical wires. 26. Slowly raise the engine approximately 6 inches and check again. 27. Raise the engine/transaxle assembly all the way and remove it from the vehicle. Place the engine on a suitable engine stand assembly. To install: 28. Slowly lower the engine and transaxle assembly into the vehicle. 29. Check that the engine and transaxle are free from any hoses or electrical connectors. 30. Install the mounts and bolts. Some of the transaxle mount bolts are designed to be torqued only one time and must be replaced whenever the engine is removed. Be sure to torque all bolts in 2 steps in the sequence shown. This is important to help minimize engine vibrations. 31. If equipped with an automatic transaxle, reinstall the control pin, cotter pin, cable holder and cable. Install the torque converter cover. 32. If equipped with a manual transaxle, install the shift rod and the shift torque rod. Connect the clutch cable and check the clutch adjustment. 33. Install the front exhaust pipe with new self locking nuts and torque to 40 ft. lbs. (55 Nm). 34. Reinstall the alternator assembly. 35. Install the halfshaft assemblies. Be sure to use new set rings. 36. Reinstall the air conditioning compressor and drive belts. 37. Install the speedometer drive. 38. Reinstall the radiator assembly, coolant hoses, heater hoses and oil cooler lines. 39. Reinstall the power steering pump and drive belts. Install the throttle cable bracket and throttle cable. 40. Reinstall the distributor assembly and ground cable to the transaxle. 41. Reinstall the control box brackets and control box connectors. Reconnect all disconnected vacuum lines and electrical connectors. 42. Reinstall the battery box, battery and battery cables. 43. Reinstall the wheel well and engine splash shields. 44. Carefully check to make sure all wires, hoses, belts and control cables are connected and properly adjusted. 45. Refill the coolant system, engine oil and transaxle fluid. Start the engine, bleed the cooling system and make all necessary adjustments. 1986-90 Legend See Figures 6, 7, and 8 On these vehicles, the engine and transaxle are removed as a unit. The lower ball joints and the inner CV-joints will be separated but not removed. 1. Raise and safely support the vehicle. 2. Disconnect both battery cables from the battery. Remove the battery and the battery tray from the engine compartment. 3. Position the hood in the vertical position by removing the prop mounting bolt on the hood side and fitting it to the mounting hole near the hinge. 4. Remove the air intake tube, air cleaner and resonator tube as an assembly. 5. Remove the splash guard from under the engine. 6. Remove the oil filler cap and drain plug to drain the engine oil. 7. Remove the radiator cap, then open the radiator drain petcock and drain the coolant from the radiator. There are also block drain bolts on each side of the engine. 8. Remove the transaxle filler plug, then remove the drain plug and drain the transaxle. 9. Disconnect the pressure switch wire from the oil filter base. 10. Disconnect both water hoses from the engine oil cooler. 11. Remove the drain bolt from the oil filter base to drain the oil. Remove the oil filter base from the engine block. 12. Disconnect the upper and lower radiator hoses from the radiator. 13. If equipped with an automatic transaxle, disconnect cooler hose from the bottom of the radiator. 14. Disconnect the following engine sub-harness connectors from the body side: A. Four right side connectors and clamp B. Both left side main fuse connectors C. Coil wire, primary lead connectors and the condenser connector. D. Both ground cables from the cylinder head and the transaxle. 15. Disconnect the connector from the power steering pump and both hoses. Disconnect the hose from the cruise control actuator and the hose from the power brake booster. 16. To relieve the fuel system pressure, place a shop rag over the fuel filter to absorb any gasoline which may be sprayed on the engine while relieving the pressure. Slowly loosen the service bolt approximately one full turn. This will relieve any pressure in the system. Using a new sealing washer, tighten the service bolt. CAUTION The fuel system may be under pressure and fuel will be sprayed. Be sure there is good ventilation and take the appropriate fire safety precautions. 17. Disconnect the fuel return hose from the pressure regulator. Remove the banjo bolt and the fuel hose. 18. Disconnect the throttle cable from the throttle body. Label and disconnect the vacuum hoses coming from the emission control equipment box. 19. Remove the speed sensor as an assembly from the transaxle. 20. The air conditioning compressor can be moved without discharging the air conditioning system. Remove the air conditioning compressor as follows: A. Remove the compressor clutch lead wire. B. Loosen the belt adjusting bolt. C. Remove the compressor mounting bolts, then lift the compressor out of the bracket with the hoses attached and hang it to the front bulkhead with a piece of wire. Do not loosen or disconnect the air conditioning freon lines. Do not vent freon into the air. 21. If equipped with an automatic transaxle, remove the center console. Place the shift lever in R , then remove the lock pin to separate the shift cable. 22. If equipped with a manual transaxle, at the shift rod universal joint, slide the pin retainer forward and drive out the spring pin. Separate the shift rod universal joint from the transaxle. Remove the banjo bolt to disconnect the clutch hydraulic hose from the clutch damper on the transmission. Catch and discard the hydraulic fluid that leaks out. 23. Remove the exhaust pipe from the front and rear manifolds. 24. Remove the halfshaft as follows: A. Raise and safely support the vehicle and remove the front wheels. B. Remove the ball joint bolt and separate the ball joint from lower control arm. C. Using a small prybar, pry out the inboard CV-joint approximately 13mm in order to release the spring clip from the differential, then pull the halfshaft from the transaxle case. D. Cover the inner CV-joints with a plastic bag and hang the halfshaft from the body with wire. Do not let the halfshafts hang by the outer CVjoint or it will be damaged. 25. Attach a suitable lifting chain to the engine and raise it enough to remove the slack. Fig. Fig. 6: Engine mount locations-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 7: Engine mount torque sequence and specifications-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 8: Additional engine mount torque specifications-1986-90 Legend 26. Remove the engine side mount bracket bolts. 27. Remove the front engine mount nut, then remove the rear engine mount nut. 28. Loosen and remove the alternator belt. Disconnect the alternator wire harness and remove the alternator. 29. Remove the bolt from the rear torque rod at the engine, then loosen the bolt in the frame mount and swing the rod up and out of the way. 30. Tilt the engine about 30 degrees and raise the engine carefully from the vehicle checking that all wires and hoses have been removed from the engine/transaxle. Raise the engine all the way up and remove it from the vehicle. To install: 31. Carefully fit the engine and transaxle into the vehicle. 32. Check that the engine and transaxle are free from any hoses or electrical connectors. 33. Install the transaxle and engine mounts and bolts. Some of the bolts in upper rear mount are designed to be torqued only one time and must be replaced whenever they are removed. Be sure to torque all bolts in 2 steps in the sequence shown in the illustration. This is important to help minimize engine vibrations. 34. If equipped with automatic transaxle, reinstall the control pin, cotter pin, cable holder and cable. Install the torque converter cover. 35. Reconnect the shift cable and reinstall the center console assembly. 36. If equipped with manual transaxle, connect the clutch hydraulic line, gear shift linkage and torque rod. 37. Install the front and rear exhaust pipes. 38. Reinstall the alternator assembly. 39. Install the halfshaft assemblies. Use new clips on the CV-joints and make sure they click firmly into place. Torque the lower ball joint nut to 72 ft. lbs. (100 Nm) and install a new cotter pin. 40. Reinstall the air conditioning compressor and drive belts. 41. Install the speedometer drive assembly. 42. Reinstall the radiator assembly, coolant hoses, heater hoses and oil cooler lines. 43. Reconnect the power steering hoses and refill the reservoir to the upper mark. Install the throttle cable bracket and throttle cable. 44. Install the distributor assembly and ground cable to the transaxle. 45. Install the control box brackets and control box connectors. Reconnect all disconnected vacuum lines and electrical connectors. 46. Reinstall the battery box, battery and battery cables. Install the hood back to its proper position. 47. Install the wheel well and engine splash shields. 48. Refill the coolant system, engine oil and transaxle fluid. Start the engine and bleed the steering system by turning the steering wheel lock-to-lock several times. Bleed the cooling system by opening the bleeder screw near the thermostat housing. Make all other necessary adjustments. 1991-93 Legend See Figures 9, 10 and 11 Portions of the front sub-frame are made of aluminum alloy. Using normal steel bolts on aluminum will cause an electrolytic reaction: the aluminum around the fastener will corrode and the bolt will loosen. When replacing fasteners, be sure to use bolts that have a Dacro® coating specifically designed for such applications. Dacro® bolts can be identified by a dull grey finish, sometimes with a dull green finish on the threads for more accurate torque wrench readings. These parts should be available at the dealer. On this vehicle, the engine and transaxle are lifted out as a unit. The battery will also be removed. Since the vehicle is equipped with a theft protected radio, it is important to have the security code before disconnecting the battery. After reconnecting power to the radio, the 5 digit code must be entered to restore operation. 1. Do not remove the hood. Disconnect the hood stay strut and reconnect it to hold the hood in a vertical position. Remove the battery and the battery box. 2. Remove the strut bar that runs across the engine compartment and the bracket. Working underneath the vehicle, remove the splash shield and drain the engine coolant and oil and the transaxle fluid. 3. Label and disconnect the starter and battery wiring from the main fuse/relay box. Remove the ground cable from the engine block and label and disconnect the main engine wiring harness. 4. Remove the throttle cable cover. Without turning the adjusting nut, loosen the locknut, which is closer to the throttle, and disconnect the throttle cable from the throttle and bracket. 5. Remove the air cleaner assembly and ducting. 6. On the right shock tower, disconnect the igniter unit and remove the wiring harness clamp. Disconnect the engine ground cable. 7. On the firewall behind the right cylinder head is a control box containing emission control equipment. Without disconnecting any vacuum hoses, unplug the electrical connectors and remove the control box from the firewall. Lay the box on top of the engine. 8. Label and disconnect the main engine wiring harness connectors and remove the bracket. 9. On top of the fuel filter, relieve the fuel system pressure by slowly loosening the service bolt 1 turn. CAUTION The fuel system may be under pressure and fuel will be sprayed. Be sure there is good ventilation and take the appropriate fire safety precautions. 10. Remove the fuel supply hose and disconnect the return hose from the pressure regulator. 11. Disconnect the vacuum hose to the brake booster at the check valve. 12. At the left rear of the engine compartment, disconnect the transaxle wiring harness and remove the clamp. 13. Disconnect and plug the transaxle cooling hoses at the radiator. Disconnect the upper and lower hoses and the fan and sensor wiring. Remove the radiator and fans as an assembly. 14. Near the power steering fluid reservoir, remove the solenoid valve assembly, vacuum pipes and air tank. 15. Without disconnecting any hoses, remove the power steering pump and secure it out of the way. 16. Raise and safely support the vehicle and remove the front wheels. 17. Remove the lower damper forks and remove the nut from the lower ball joint. Use a suitable ball joint removal tool to disconnect the ball joint from the lower control arm. 18. Carefully pry the inner CV-joints from the transaxle and hang the halfshafts from the suspension. Do not let the halfshaft hang by the outer CV-joint or the joint will be damaged. Cover the inner joints with plastic bags. 19. Remove the lower plate from the rear beam. 20. Without disconnecting any hoses, remove the power steering speed sensor from the differential housing. 21. Disconnect the exhaust pipe from the catalyst and remove it from the manifolds. 22. Without disconnecting any hoses, remove the air conditioner compressor and hang it from the body with wire. Do not loosen or disconnect the air conditioning freon lines. Do not vent freon into the air. 23. On vehicles with a manual transaxle, remove the clutch slave cylinder without disconnecting the hydraulic line. Disconnect the shift lever torque rod and disconnect the shift linkage by driving out the 8mm roll pin. Fig. Fig. 9: Engine mount torque sequence-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 10: Engine mount torque specifications-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 11: Front and rear sub-frame mounting-1991-93 Legend 24. Remove the engine mid-mount nuts and bolts and the transaxle rear mount. 25. Working from above, remove one of the EGR valve passage bolts and install a lifting hook. Attach a chain hoist and take up the slack. 26. Remove all engine and transaxle mounting nuts and bolts. Raise the engine/transaxle slightly and check to make sure all hoses and wires have been disconnected. As the unit is raised, allow it to tilt up in front to provide proper clearance past the rear beam. To install: 27. When installing the engine/transaxle, rotate the unit up in front to avoid hitting the rear beam with the transaxle. Check carefully to make sure the rubber mounts are not twisted or offset. Start all the nuts and bolts and then torque them in the order shown in the illustration. This is important to help minimize engine vibrations. 28. After the mounts have been properly torqued, install the mounting bolts on the rear transaxle mount and torque to 28 ft. lbs. (39 Nm). Install the engine mid-mounts and torque the nuts and bolts to 28 ft. lbs. (39 Nm). Remove the lifting hook and install the EGR valve passage bolt. 29. Reconnect the shift linkage. On vehicles with a manual transaxle, install the clutch slave cylinder. 30. Install the air conditioner compressor and torque the mounting bolt to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). Adjust the belt tension for about 1 / 4 in. of deflection with 22 lbs. (10 kg) force and torque the idler pulley nut to 33 ft. lbs. 45 Nm). 31. When installing the exhaust pipe, use new gaskets and self locking nuts. Torque the manifold nuts to 40 ft. lbs. (55 Nm) and the catalyst flange nuts to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). 32. Install the power steering speed sensor and connect the wiring. Torque the bolts to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm). 33. Install the lower plate using the special corrosion resistant bolts. Torque to 29 ft. lbs. (39 Nm). 34. Install new clips to the end of the inner CV-joints and press the joints into the transaxle. Make sure joint clicks solidly into place. When assembling the suspension, torque the lower ball joint nut to 51-58 ft. lbs. (70-80 Nm). Torque the lower damper bolt to 51 ft. lbs. (70 Nm) and the upper damper pinch bolt to 37 ft. lbs. (51 Nm). 35. Install the power steering pump and adjust the belt tension for about 1 / 2 inch deflection with 22 lbs. (10 kg) force. Torque the mounting bolt to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm) and the nut to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). 36. Install the radiator and connect the cooling hoses. When filling the system, open the bleeder where the upper hose connects to the engine. 37. Install the emission control equipment bracket and connect wiring and vacuum hoses. 38. Install the fuel supply pipe, using new gaskets. Connect the return hose and the brake booster vacuum hose. Finish connecting all the remaining wiring and vacuum hoses, except for the battery. 39. Install the throttle cable. If the adjuster nut (farther from the boot) has been moved, temporarily tighten the lock nut. The engine must be fully warmed up to adjust the cable. 40. Install the air cleaner and ducting, strut bar and splash shield. 41. Refill the engine oil and transaxle fluid and install the battery. When the battery is connected, turn the ignition switch ON and OFF a number of times to pressurize the fuel system and check for leaks. 42. After checking carefully and making sure everything is properly connected, start the engine and bleed the cooling system. When the engine is at operating temperature, stop the engine and adjust the throttle cable. 43. To adjust the throttle cable, loosen both nuts and take up the slack in the cable. Back the adjusting nut away from the bracket so there is 0.120 in. (3.0mm) gap between the nut and bracket. Make sure the throttle opens and closes fully with pedal movement. Vigor See Figures 12 and 13 On these vehicles, the engine and differential are removed as a unit but the transmission remains in the vehicle. The lower ball joints and the inner CVjoints will be separated but not removed. The radio is equipped with a theft protection program. Be sure the 5 digit security code is available before disconnecting the battery. 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Raise and safely support the vehicle and remove the engine splash shield. 2. Drain the engine oil and coolant and the fluid from the transmission and differential. 3. It is not necessary to remove the hood. Raise it to a full vertical position and support it properly. 4. Label and disconnect the wiring from the ignition coil and from the ABS relay box. 5. Remove the ABS relay box and heat shield and remove the battery. 6. Remove the intake air duct and air cleaner assembly. 7. Remove the fuel filler cap and loosen the service bolt on the fuel filter banjo bolt to relieve the fuel system pressure. Remove the banjo bolt to remove the fuel feed hose from the fuel filter. Remove the fuel return hose from the pressure regulator. CAUTION The fuel system may be under pressure and fuel will be sprayed. Be sure there is good ventilation and take the appropriate fire safety precautions. 8. Remove the throttle cable by loosening the locknut, then slip the cable end out of the throttle bracket and accelerator linkage. Take care not to bend the cable when removing it. Unbolt the throttle cable clamp and move the cable aside. 9. Label and disconnect all the engine wiring harnesses. 10. Disconnect the charcoal canister hoses, fuel return hose, brake booster hose and the emission control vacuum hose. 11. Disconnect the heater hoses and the transmission wiring connector that is near the heater hoses. 12. Disconnect the wiring and remove the 2 bolts to remove the distributor. Be careful not to lose the collar that is behind the distributor. 13. Label and disconnect the wiring as required from the relay box under the hood. Disconnect the ground cables in the same area. 14. Without disconnecting the hoses, remove the power steering pump and the air conditioner compressor and secure them out of the way. Do not loosen or disconnect the air conditioning freon lines. Do not vent freon into the air. 15. On the transmission, remove the speed sensor without disconnecting the hydraulic hoses. Disconnect the wiring and secure the unit out of the way. 16. Disconnect the transmission cooler hoses, upper and lower radiator hoses and the fan wiring. Remove the 2 upper brackets to remove the radiator assembly. 17. If equipped with an automatic transmission, remove the small torque converter cover. Rotate the crankshaft as required to remove the torque converter-to-drive plate bolts. 18. To disconnect the halfshafts, the lower damper fork and ball joint must be disconnected, allowing the steering knuckle to move away from the transaxle. A. With the front wheels removed, remove the damper fork nut and pinch bolt. Remove the damper fork from the lower arm. B. Remove the lower ball joint castle nut press the ball joint out of the lower arm using a suitable puller, with the puller jaws grasping the lower arm. C. Carefully pry the inner CV-joint away from the transaxle to force the set ring at the inner end past the groove. D. Pull the inboard CV-joint, not the halfshaft, and remove the CV-joint out of the intermediate shaft. Do not pull on the halfshaft, as the CV-joint may come apart. Use care when prying out the assembly and pull it straight to avoid damaging the intermediate shaft seals. 19. Remove the oxygen sensor from the exhaust system and remove the front exhaust pipe. 20. If equipped with an automatic transmission, make sure the selector is in P . On manual transmission, put the selector into first gear. 21. On the lower left side of transmission housing, pry out the extension shaft cover and remove the 33mm sealing cap. 22. Use the extension shaft puller, tool no. 07LAC PW50100 to disengage the extension shaft from the differential. Remove the shaft. 23. Attach a lifting hoist to the engine lifting points and remove the upper engine-to-transmission bolts. Don't lose the 26mm spacer shim that is on the bolt near the differential. 24. Temporarily remove the left transmission mount. Fig. Fig. 12: Engine mount location and torque specifications-Vigor Fig. Fig. 13: Additional engine mounting torque specifications-Vigor 25. Remove the left front engine mount nut and stopper bolt. Remove the right front mount nut. 26. Remove the mid mounts. On automatic transmissions, there is a spacer between the mounts. 27. Support the transmission with a jack and remove the lower engine-to-transmission bolts. Separate the engine from the transmission and begin lifting the engine out. Make sure all hoses, wires and cables are disconnected before raising the engine all the way out. 28. After removing the engine, install the transmission mid mounts. To install: 29. Before fitting the engine into place, make sure the pinion shaft in the differential is packed with high temperature molybdenum grease. Grease the extension shaft in the transmission and make sure it will not interfere with engine installation. 30. Support the transmission and remove the mid mounts. Carefully fit the engine into place and start the upper engine-to-transmission bolts. Slowly tighten 2 bolts on opposite sides just enough to draw the engine and transmission together. Install all the remaining bolts except for the differential-to-transmission housing bolt that had the spacer. Do not fully tighten the bolts yet. 31. If either the engine, transmission or differential is being replaced, the space between the differential and transmission housings must be measured and the correct shim installed. Shims are available in increments of 0.004 in. (0.1mm). Measure the space between the housings with a feeler gauge. Install the largest shim possible that does not exceed the measurement. If the wrong shim is installed, the differential or transmission housing could be cracked. 32. With the proper shim installed, torque the bolts to 54 ft. lbs. (75 Nm). 33. Loosely install the nuts and bolts for all the mounts and set the engine into place. Remove the lifting equipment. 34. Check the illustration and tighten the mounting nuts and bolts in the sequence shown to the correct torque. This is important for minimizing engine vibration and premature mount failure. 35. With the engine and transmission secure, grease the spline on the extension shaft and push it into place. Make sure the set ring clicks firmly into place. Coat the threads of the 33mm sealing cap with a sealing compound, install the cap and torque it to 58 ft. lbs. (80 Nm). Install the cover. 36. On an automatic transmission, install the torque converter-to-drive plate bolts and torque to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm). Do not over torque these bolts or the plate will distort. Install the cover. 37. Install the exhaust pipe with new self locking nuts and gaskets. Torque the nuts to 25 ft. lbs. (34 Nm). 38. Fit new set rings to the inner CV-joints. Press the joints into the differential and make sure the set ring snaps into place. 39. Connect the ball joint and damper fork. Torque the ball joint nut to 43 ft. lbs. (60 Nm) and install a new cotter pin. 40. Install the radiator assembly and connect the wiring and hoses. 41. Install the speed sensor, air conditioning compressor, power steering pump and alternator. Install and adjust the belts. 42. Before installing the distributor, check the condition of the O-rings on the collar. 43. Connect all remaining hoses, wires and control cables and adjust as required. Check the wiring carefully before connecting the battery. 44. After the engine is running, turn the heater control to full warm and bleed the cooling system. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Engine Cooling Fan/Auxiliary Cooling Fan TESTING Print 1. Disconnect the electrical connector from the cooling fan motor. 2. Test the cooling fan motor operation by connecting 12 volts source to terminal A (top) and negative to terminal B (bottom). 3. If the motor fails to run or run smoothly, replace it. REMOVAL & INSTALLATION 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Disconnect the electrical connection at the cooling fan motor. 2. Remove all cooling fan wire retaining clips. 3. Remove the radiator fan shroud retaining bolts and remove the shroud assembly from the vehicle. 4. Remove the cooling fan mounting nuts and remove the cooling fan from the shroud. On some vehicles there may be enough clearance to remove the cooling fan motor from the vehicle without removing the fan shroud. 5. To install, reverse the removal procedure. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Engine Overhaul Tips See Figure 1 Print Fig. Fig. 1: Using a screw in type compression gauge Most engine overhaul procedures are fairly standard. In addition to specific parts replacement procedures and complete specifications for your individual engine, this chapter also is a guide to accepted rebuilding procedures. Examples of standard rebuilding practices are shown and should be used along with specific details concerning your particular engine. Competent and accurate machine shop services will ensure maximum performance, reliability and engine life. In most instances, it is more profitable for the do-it-yourself mechanic to remove, clean and inspect the component, buy the necessary parts and deliver these to a shop for actual machine work. On the other hand, much of the rebuilding work (crankshaft, block, bearings, pistons, rods and other components) is well within the scope of the do-ityourself mechanic. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Exhaust Manifold REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print Integra See Figure 1 Do not perform this operation on a warm or hot engine. 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Remove the exhaust manifold shroud. 2. Remove the exhaust pipe-to-exhaust manifold nuts. 3. Remove the oxygen sensor, if equipped. 4. Remove the exhaust manifold bracket bolt. 5. Remove the exhaust manifold-to-cylinder head nuts in a crisscrosss pattern starting from the center and the manifold. Fig. Fig. 1: Exhaust manifold mounting-Integra 6. Clean the gasket mounting surfaces. Inspect the manifold for cracks, flatness and/or damage; replace the parts if necessary. To install: 7. Use new gaskets and reverse the removal procedures. Torque the manifold nuts in a crisscrosss pattern starting from the center, to 23 ft. lbs. (32 Nm) and the exhaust pipe-to-manifold nuts to 40 ft. lbs. (55 Nm). 8. Start the engine and check for leaks. Legend See Figures 2 and 3 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Remove the exhaust manifold shrouds. 2. Remove the exhaust pipe-to-exhaust manifold nuts. 3. Remove the oxygen sensors. 4. Remove the air suction tube. 5. Remove the exhaust pipe-to-exhaust manifold nuts. 6. Clean the gasket mounting surfaces. Inspect the manifold for cracks, flatness and/or damage; replace the parts, if necessary. 7. Remove the exhaust attaching nuts in a crass-cross pattern starting from the center of the manifold. Fig. Fig. 2: Exhaust manifold mounting-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 3: Exhaust manifold mounting-1991-93 Legend 8. To install, use new gaskets and reverse the removal procedures. Torque the manifold nuts/bolts in a crisscrosss pattern starting from the center, to 22 ft. lbs. (31 Nm). 9. Use new gaskets when installing the exhaust pipe to the manifold and torque the nuts to 40 ft. lbs. (55 Nm). Vigor See Figure 4 1. Remove the heat shields. 2. Disconnect the wiring and remove the oxygen sensor. 3. Disconnect the exhaust pipe. 4. Remove the bracket and remove the nuts to remove the manifold. Fig. Fig. 4: Exhaust manifold mounting-Vigor 5. Install the bracket loosely and install the manifold with new gaskets and self-locking nuts. Torque the nuts to 23 ft. lbs. (32 Nm), then tighten the bracket bolts. 6. When installing the oxygen sensor, lightly coat the threads with an anti-seize compound. Be careful not to get any on the head of the sensor. 7. Use a new gasket and connect the exhaust pipe. Torque the nuts to 40 ft. lbs. (55 Nm). Install the heat shields. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Flywheel/Flexplate REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print See Figure 1 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. 2. Raise and safely support the vehicle. 3. Remove the transaxle assembly. Refer to Drive Train . 4. If equipped with a manual transaxle, remove the clutch assembly. Refer to Drive Train . 5. If equipped with manual transaxle, remove the flywheel-to-crankshaft bolts and the flywheel. If equipped with automatic transaxle, remove the flexplate-to-crankshaft bolts and the flexplate. Remove the flexplate shims, if equipped. 6. Installation is the reverse of the removal procedure. Tighten the flywheel/flexplate bolts to 54 ft. lbs. (75 Nm) on automatic transaxle equipped models and 76 ft. lbs. (105 Nm) on manual transaxle equipped models. Fig. Fig. 1: Flywheel bolt installation-manual transaxle Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Freeze Plugs REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print 1. Raise and safely support the vehicle, as required. 2. Drain the cooling system. If the freeze plug is located in the cylinder block, it will be necessary to remove the drain plug from the side of the block to make sure all coolant is drained. 3. Drill a 1 / 2 in. (13mm) hole in the center of the plug. Remove the plug with a slide hammer or pry it out with a prybar. Be careful to stop drilling as soon as the bit breaks through the plug to prevent damaging the engine. 4. Clean all dirt and corrosion from the freeze plug bore. Check the freeze plug bore for damage that would interfere with sealing. If the bore is damaged, the bore will have to be machined for an oversize plug. To install: 5. Coat the plug bore and the freeze plug sealing surface with water proof sealer. 6. Install cup-type freeze plugs with the flanged edge outward. The plug must be driven in with a tool that does not contact the flange of the plug. If an improper tool is used, the plug sealing edge will be damaged and leakage will result. 7. Expansion-type freeze plugs are installed with the flanged edge inward. The plug must be driven in with a tool that does not contact the crowned portion of the plug. If an improper tool is used, the plug and/or plug bore will be damaged. 8. Replace any drain plugs that were removed and lower the vehicle. 9. Fill the cooling system, start the engine and check for leaks. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Front Oil Pump Seal REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print 1. Remove the timing belt. 2. Slide the crankshaft sprocket and belt guides from the crankshaft. 3. Using a small prybar, pry the oil seal from the oil pump housing; be careful not to damage the seal's mounting surface. 4. Using a new oil seal, lubricate the seal lips with engine oil. Using a seal drive tool, drive the new seal into the oil pump housing until it seats. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Ignition System and Distributor The diagnosis and service of all ignition system components can be found in Engine Electrical of this repair guide under "Electronic Ignition System". Print Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Inspection Techniques Procedures and specifications are given in this chapter for inspecting, cleaning and assessing the wear limits of most major components. Print Other procedures such as Magnaflux® and Zyglo® can be used to locate material flaws and stress cracks. Magnaflux® is a magnetic process applicable only to ferrous materials. The Zyglo® process coats the material with a fluorescent dye penetrant and can be used on any material. Check for suspected surface cracks can be more readily made using spot check dye. The dye is sprayed onto the suspected area, wiped off and the area sprayed with a developer. Cracks will show up brightly. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Intake Manifold REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print Integra See Figures 1 and 2 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Drain the cooling system. 2. Remove the air duct from the throttle body. 3. Remove the intake manifold bracket and the EACV. 4. Relieve the fuel system pressure by loosening the service bolt on the fuel filter about 1 turn, then disconnect the fuel supply and return lines from the manifold. CAUTION The fuel system may be under pressure and fuel will be sprayed. Be sure there is good ventilation and take the appropriate fire safety precautions. 5. Label and remove any electrical connectors running to the intake manifold. 6. Remove the intake manifold-to-cylinder head nuts, in a crisscrosss pattern, beginning from the center and moving out to both ends. Remove the manifold and the gasket. 7. Clean the gasket mounting surfaces. Inspect the manifold for cracks, flatness and/or damage; replace the parts, if necessary. If the intake manifold is to be replaced, transfer all the necessary components to the new manifold. To install: 8. Use new gaskets and reverse the removal procedures. Torque the nuts/bolts, in a crisscrosss pattern, in 2-3 steps, starting with the inner nuts, to 17 ft. lbs. (23 Nm). 9. Start the engine, allow it to reach normal operating temperatures and check for leaks and proper engine operation. Fig. Fig. 1: Intake manifold mounting-1991-93 Integra 1.8L engine Fig. Fig. 2: Intake manifold mounting-1991-93 Integra 1.7L engine Legend See Figures 3 and 4 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Drain the cooling system. 2. Remove the air duct from the throttle body. 3. Remove the EACV, the air suction valve and the EGR tube. 4. Label and remove any wires running to the intake manifold. 5. Relieve the fuel system pressure by loosening the service bolt on the fuel filter about 1 turn, then disconnect the fuel supply and return lines from the manifold. CAUTION The fuel system may be under pressure and fuel will be sprayed. Be sure there is good ventilation and take the appropriate fire safety precautions. 6. Remove the intake manifold nuts in a crisscrosss pattern, beginning from the center and moving out to both ends and the manifold. 7. Clean the gasket mounting surfaces. Inspect the manifold for cracks, flatness and/or damage; replace the parts as necessary. If the intake manifold is to be replaced, transfer all the necessary components to the new manifold. To install: 8. Use new gaskets and reverse the removal procedures. Torque the nuts/bolts, in a crisscrosss pattern in 2-3 steps, starting with the inner nuts. Torque the 8mm bolts to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm) and the 6mm bolts to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm). 9. Start the engine, allow it to reach normal operating temperatures and check for leaks and engine operation. Fig. Fig. 3: Intake manifold mounting-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 4: Intake manifold mounting-1991-93 Legend Vigor The radio is equipped with a theft protection program. Be sure the 5 digit security code is available before disconnecting the battery. 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. 2. Remove the fuel filler cap and loosen the service bolt on the fuel filter banjo bolt to relieve the fuel system pressure. Remove the banjo bolt to remove the fuel feed hose from the fuel filter. Remove the fuel return hose from the pressure regulator. CAUTION The fuel system may be under pressure and fuel will be sprayed. Be sure there is good ventilation and take the appropriate fire safety precautions. 3. Remove the intake air duct and air cleaner assembly. 4. Remove the throttle cable by loosening the locknut, then slip the cable end out of the throttle bracket and accelerator linkage. Take care not to bend the cable when removing it. Unbolt the throttle cable clamp and move the cable aside. 5. Label and disconnect the vacuum hoses and all wiring from the intake manifold. 6. To avoid having to drain the cooling system, remove the Fast Idle Valve and the EACV without disconnecting the coolant hoses and lay them aside. Be careful not to lose the O-rings. 7. Remove the EGR pipe and the vacuum pipe. 8. Remove the intake manifold brackets. 9. Remove the nuts to remove the intake manifold from the engine. To install: 10. Fit the manifold to the engine with a new gasket and torque the nuts to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). 11. Install any components that were removed with new gaskets or O-rings as required. If the fuel injectors were removed, replace the seal rings and cushion rings to prevent noise and leakage. 12. Connect the wiring, vacuum hoses and fuel lines. 13. Connect and adjust the throttle cable as required. 14. Run the engine and check for leaks. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Oil Pan REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print Integra and 1986-90 Legend See Figures 1 and 2 Fig. Fig. 1: Engine lubrication system components-1986-90 Integra Fig. Fig. 2: Engine lubrication system components-1986-90 Legend 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Drain the engine oil. 2. Raise and safely support the vehicle. Remove the lower splash pan, if equipped. 3. Remove the exhaust pipe from the manifold and from the catalyst. 4. Loosen the oil pan bolts in a crisscrosss pattern beginning with the outside bolt. To remove the oil pan, lightly tap the corners of the oil pan with a mallet. Clean off all the old gasket material. 5. Installation is the reverse of removal. On 1989 models, apply gasket sealer to the corners of the pan where it bends around the oil pump. Torque the bolts to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm), starting in the center and working out. Vigor and 1991-93 Legend See Figures 3 through 7 Oil pan removal in these vehicles requires disconnecting the lower ball joints and removing the differential. Special tools are required to remove and install the extension shaft: 07LAC-PW50100 puller, or equivalent, and 07MAF-PY40100 installer, or equivalent. 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Drain the engine oil. 2. Raise and safely support the vehicle and remove the front wheels. 3. Remove the damper forks. 4. Remove the lower ball joint nut and use a ball joint press tool to disconnect the ball joint from the control arm. 5. Carefully pry the inner CV-joints out of their sockets. Wrap them in plastic to keep them clean and do not let the drive shafts hang by the outer CVjoint. 6. Remove the engine splash shield and lower plate from the rear beam. On Legend, some of the bolts have a special coating for use in aluminum alloy. Do not substitute normal steel fasteners. 7. Drain the engine oil and coolant. On Vigor, remove the transmission mount and bracket. 8. Drain the oil from the differential. 9. Without disconnecting the hoses, remove the power steering speed sensor from the differential. 10. Disconnect the differential oil cooler hoses. 11. Shift the transmission into 1st gear (manual) or P (automatic) and remove the secondary shaft cover and sealing bolt. Fig. Fig. 3: Oil pan mounting-1991-93 Integra Fig. Fig. 4: Engine lubrication system components-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 5: Oil pan bolt torque sequence-1991-93 Legend 12. Install the puller and disengage the extension shaft from the differential. 13. On Vigor, remove the left front engine mount and bracket. 14. Remove the mounting bolts and the 26mm shim and remove the differential. 15. On Legend, without disconnecting any hoses, remove the air conditioner compressor. Do not loosen or disconnect the air conditioning freon lines. Do not vent freon into the air. 16. Unbolt the intermediate shaft bearing housing from the oil pan and remove the intermediate shaft. 17. On Vigor, remove the set plate that holds the oil pan inner pipe from the right side of the engine. 18. Remove any brackets or covers and remove the oil pan. To install: 19. Install new O-rings and apply liquid gasket evenly in a thin bead to the mating surface of the pan. Do not apply liquid gasket to the O-rings. 20. Install the oil pan and torque the bolts in the correct sequence to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). 21. On Vigor, install the oil pan inner pipe with new O-rings and tighten the set plate in place. On Legend, install the flywheel cover and engine stiffener. Fig. Fig. 6: Engine lubrication system components-Vigor Fig. Fig. 7: Oil pan bolt torque sequence and seal application-Vigor 22. Install the differential, making sure the original shim is in the proper position. Torque the bolts to 47 ft. lbs. (65 Nm). Connect the cooling hoses. 23. Apply grease to the spline of the extension shaft and install a new set ring. Thread the special installation tool into the transmission case to install the extension shaft. 24. Pack the extension shaft cavity with special Honda grease, part number UM264, or equivalent, and install the sealing bolt. Torque the bolt to 58 ft. lbs. (80 Nm) and install the secondary cover. 25. On Legend, install the air conditioner compressor and adjust the belt tension. 26. Install the intermediate shaft, torque the bolts to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). 27. Install the speed sensor. 28. Install new set rings, then press the CV-joints into their sockets. 29. When installing the lower ball joint nuts, torque them to 51-58 ft. lbs. (70-80 Nm) and install a new cotter pin. Torque the damper fork bolts to 51 ft. lbs. (70 Nm). 30. On Legend, install the rear beam and torque the bolts to 44 ft. lbs. (60 Nm). When installing the lower plate, torque the specially coated bolts to 29 ft. lbs. (39 Nm). 31. Install the remaining parts and refill the differential, engine oil and cooling system. Open the cooling system bleeder at the engine end of the upper radiator hose when filling the system. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Oil Pump REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print See Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4 Fig. Fig. 1: Checking oil pump inner rotor-to-outer rotor radial clearance Fig. Fig. 2: Checking oil pump housing-to-rotor axial clearance Fig. Fig. 3: Checking oil pump housing-to-rotor radial clearance Fig. Fig. 4: Installing the front cover oil seal 1. Disconnect the negative battery terminal. Raise and safely support the vehicle, drain the oil and remove the oil pan. 2. Make sure the crankshaft is at TDC on No. 1 cylinder and remove the timing belt cover and the timing belt. 3. Remove the oil pan and the pick-up screen. 4. Remove the oil pump from the front of the engine. Any time the oil pump is removed, the front oil seal should be replaced. 5. Installation is the reverse of removal. Use new O-rings and apply liquid gasket to the pump mounting face. Torque the 6mm bolts to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm) and the 8mm bolts to 17 ft. lbs. (24 Nm). CHECKING 1. Check the rotor radial clearance: A. New: 0.002-0.006 in. (0.04-0.16mm) B. Limit: 0.008 in. (0.20mm) 2. Check the housing-to-rotor axial clearance: A. New: 0.001-0.003 in. (0.02-0.07mm) B. Limit: 0.006 in. (0.15mm) 3. Check the housing-to-rotor radial clearance: A. New: 0.004-0.007 in. (0.10-0.18mm) B. Limit: 0.008 in. (0.20mm) Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Overhaul Tips Aluminum has become extremely popular for use in engines, due to its low weight. Observe the following precautions when handling aluminum parts: Print Never hot tank aluminum parts (the caustic hot-tank solution will eat the aluminum). Remove all aluminum parts (identification tag, etc.) from engine parts prior to hot-tanking. Always coat threads lightly with engine oil or anti-seize compounds before installation, to prevent seizure. Never over-torque bolts or spark plugs, especially in aluminum threads. Stripped threads in any component can be repaired using any of several commercial repair kits (Heli-Coil®, Microdot®, Keenserts®, etc.). When assembling the engine, any parts that will be in frictional contact must be prelubed to provide lubrication at initial start-up. Any product specifically formulated for this purpose can be used but engine oil is not recommended as a prelube. When semi-permanent (locked, but removable) installation of bolts or nuts is desired, threads should be cleaned and coated with Loctite® or other similar, commercial non-hardening sealant. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Pistons and Connecting Rods REMOVAL Print See Figures 1, 2 and 3 Although the pistons and connecting rods can be removed from the engine (after the cylinder head and oil pan are removed) while the engine is still in the car; it is far easier to work on the engine when removed from the car, and advisable for assembly cleanliness. 1. Remove the engine from the vehicle and mount it on a suitable workstand. 2. Remove the cylinder head(s) and the oil pan. 3. The position of each piston, connecting rod and connecting rod cap should be noted before any are removed, so they can be reinstalled in the same location. 4. Check the tops of the pistons and the sides of the connecting rods for identifying marks. In some engines, the top of the piston will be numbered to correspond with the cylinder number. The connecting rod and connecting rod cap should have numbers stamped on them where they meet that also correspond with their cylinder number. Refer to the firing order diagrams in Engine Electrical to see how the cylinders are numbered. If you cannot see any identifying numbers, use a number punch set and stamp in the numbers yourself. 5. Rotate the crankshaft until the piston to be removed is at the bottom of the cylinder. Check for a ridge at the top of the cylinder bore before removing the piston and connecting rod assembly, referring to the Ridge Removal and Honing procedure. 6. Loosen the connecting rod nuts until the nuts are flush with the ends of the rod bolts. Using a hammer and a brass drift or piece of wood, lightly tap on the nuts/bolts until the connecting rod cap is loosened from the connecting rod. Remove the nuts, rod cap and lower bearing insert. 7. Slip a piece of snug fitting rubber hose over each rod bolt, to prevent the bolt threads from damaging the crankshaft during removal. 8. Using a hammer handle or piece of wood or plastic, tap the rod and piston upward in the bore until the piston rings clear the cylinder block. Remove the piston and connecting rod assembly from the top of the cylinder bore. Fig. Fig. 1: Removing a ridge from the cylinder block using a ridge reamer Fig. Fig. 2: The proper way to remove the piston is by pushing it to the top of the bore and then removing it Fig. Fig. 3: Remove the piston from the block by using a hammer handle to push it out CLEANING AND INSPECTION See Figures 4, 5, 6 and 7 1. Remove the piston rings using a piston ring expander. Refer to the Piston Ring Replacement procedure. 2. Clean the ring grooves with a ring groove cleaner, being careful not to cut into the piston metal. Heavy carbon deposits can be cleaned from the top of the piston with a wire brush, however, do not use a wire wheel on the ring grooves or lands. Clean the oil drain holes in the ring grooves. Clean all remaining dirt, carbon and varnish from the piston with a suitable solvent and a brush; do not use a caustic solution. 3. After cleaning, inspect the piston for scuffing, scoring, cracks, pitting or excessive ring groove wear. Replace any piston that is obviously worn. 4. If the piston appears okay, measure the piston diameter using a micrometer. Measure the piston diameter in the thrust direction. On all engines, measure 0.0709 in. (18mm) from the bottom of the skirt. 5. Measure the cylinder bore diameter using a bore gauge, or with a telescope gauge and micrometer. The measurement should be made in the piston thrust direction (perpendicular to the piston pin), about 2 1 / 2 in. (63.5mm) below the cylinder block deck. 6. Subtract the piston diameter measurement made in Step 4 from the cylinder bore measurement made in Step 5. This is the piston-to-bore clearance. If the clearance is within specification, light finish honing is all that is necessary. If the clearance is excessive, the cylinder must be bored and the piston replaced. Consult an automotive machine shop. If the pistons are replaced, the piston rings must also be replaced. 7. If the piston-to-bore clearance is okay, check the ring groove clearance. Insert the ring that will be used in the ring groove and check the clearance with a feeler gauge. Compare your measurement with specification. Replace the piston if the ring groove clearance is not within specification. 8. Check the connecting rod for damage or obvious wear. Check for signs of fractures and check the bearing bore for out-of-round and taper. 9. A shiny surface on the pin boss side of the piston usually indicates that the connecting rod is bent or the wrist pin hole is not in proper relation to the piston skirt and ring grooves. 10. Abnormal connecting rod bearing wear can be caused by either a bent connecting rod, an improperly machined journal, or a tapered connecting rod bore. 11. Twisted connecting rods will not create an easily identifiable wear pattern, but badly twisted rods will disturb the action of the entire piston, rings, and connecting rod assembly and may be the cause of excessive oil consumption. 12. If a connecting rod problem is suspected, consult an automotive machine shop to have the rod checked. Fig. Fig. 4: Checking the cylinder bore diameter Fig. Fig. 5: Checking the piston diameter Fig. Fig. 6: Checking the piston-to-bore clearance Fig. Fig. 7: Checking the ring clearance using a feeler gauge RIDGE REMOVAL AND HONING See Figure 8 1. Before the piston is removed from the cylinder, check for a ridge at the top of the cylinder bore. This ridge occurs because the piston ring does not travel all the way to the top of the bore, thereby leaving an unused portion of cylinder bore. 2. Clean away any carbon buildup at the top of the cylinder with sand paper, in order to see the extent of the ridge more clearly. If the ridge is slight, it will be safe to remove the pistons without damaging the rings or piston ring lands. If the ridge is severe, and easily catches your fingernail, it will have to be removed using a ridge reamer. A severe ridge is an indication of excessive bore wear. Before removing the piston, check the cylinder bore diameter with a bore gauge, as explained in the piston and connecting rod cleaning and inspection procedure. Compare your measurement with specification. If the bore is excessively worn, the cylinder will have to bored oversize and the piston and rings replaced. 3. Install the ridge removal tool in the top of the cylinder bore. Carefully follow the manufacturers instructions for operation. Only remove the amount of material necessary to remove the ridge. WARNING Be very careful if you are unfamiliar with operating a ridge reamer. It is very easy to remove more cylinder bore material than you want, possibly requiring a cylinder overbore and piston replacement that may not have been necessary. 4. After the piston and connecting rod assembly have been removed, check the clearances as explained in the piston and connecting rod cleaning and inspection procedure, to determine whether boring and honing or just light honing are required. If boring is necessary, consult an automotive machine shop. If light honing is all that is necessary, proceed to Step 5. 5. Honing is best done with the crankshaft removed, to prevent damage to the crankshaft and to make post-honing cleaning easier, as the honing process will scatter metal particles. However, if you do not want to remove the crankshaft, position the connecting rod journal for the cylinder being honed as far away from the bottom of the cylinder bore as possible, and wrap a shop cloth around the journal. 6. Honing can be done either with a flexible glaze breaker type hone or with a rigid hone that has honing stones and guide shoes. The flexible hone removes the least amount of metal, and is especially recommended if your piston-to-cylinder bore clearance is on the loose side. The flexible hone is useful to provide a finish on which the new piston rings will seat. A rigid hone will remove more material than the flexible hone and requires more operator skill. 7. Regardless of which type of hone you use, carefully follow the manufacturers instructions for operation. 8. The hone should be moved up and down the bore at sufficient speed to obtain a uniform finish. A rigid hone will provide a definite cross-hatch finish; operate the rigid hone at a speed to obtain a 45-65° included angle in the cross-hatch. The finish marks should be clean but not sharp, free from embedded particles and torn or folded metal. 9. Periodically during the honing procedure, thoroughly clean the cylinder bore and check the piston-to-bore clearance with the piston for that cylinder. 10. After honing is completed, thoroughly wash the cylinder bores and the rest of the engine with hot water and detergent. Scrub the bores well with a stiff bristle brush and rinse thoroughly with hot water. Thorough cleaning is essential, for if any abrasive material is left in the cylinder bore, it will rapidly wear the new rings and the cylinder bore. If any abrasive material is left in the rest of the engine, it will be picked up by the oil and carried throughout the engine, damaging bearings and other parts. 11. After the bores are cleaned, wipe them down with a clean cloth coated with light engine oil, to keep them from rusting. Fig. Fig. 8: Honing the cylinder bore to remove any fine scratches or wear marks PISTON PIN REPLACEMENT All Acura engines utilize pressed-in wrist pins, which can only be removed with a press and special fixtures. Attempting to remove the wrist pins with other than these special fixtures can result in damage to the piston and/or connecting rod. If a wrist pin problem is suspected (too tight, too loose, etc.) consult an automotive machine shop. PISTON RING REPLACEMENT See Figures 9, 10 and 11 1. Remove the piston rings from the piston using a piston ring expander. 2. Clean the piston ring grooves, check the piston-to-cylinder bore clearance and check the ring groove clearance as explained in the piston and connecting rod cleaning and inspection procedure. 3. After the cylinder bores have been finish honed and cleaned, check the piston ring end gap. Compress the piston rings to be used in the cylinder, one at a time, into that cylinder. Using an inverted piston, push the ring down into the cylinder bore area where normal ring wear is not encountered. 4. Measure the ring end gap with a feeler gauge and compare to specification. A gap that is too tight is more harmful than one that is too loose (If ring end gap is excessively loose, the cylinder bore is probably worn beyond specification). 5. If the ring end gap is too tight, carefully remove the ring and file the ends squarely with a fine file to obtain the proper clearance. 6. Install the rings on the piston, lowest ring first. The lowest (oil) ring is installed by hand; the top 2 (compression) rings must be installed using a piston ring expander. There is a high risk of breaking or distorting the compression rings if they are installed by hand. 7. Install the oil ring spacer in the bottom ring groove. Make sure the ends butt together and do not overlap. The ends must be on a solid portion of the piston, not over a drain hole. 8. Start the end of an oil ring rail ring into the oil ring groove above the spacer. The end gap must be approximately 1 in. (25.4mm) away from the spacer ends. Finish installing the rail ring by spiraling it the remainder of the way on. Repeat the rail installation with the other rail ring. Its gap must be approximately 1 in. (25.4mm) on the other side of the spacer ends. 9. Install the lower compression ring in the piston ring expander with the proper side up. The piston ring packaging should contain instructions as to the directions the ring sides should face. Spread the ring with the expander and install it on the piston. 10. Repeat Step 9 to install the top compression ring. Space the compression ring gaps approximately 2 in. (50.8mm) on opposite sides of the oil ring gaps. If the instructions on the ring packaging differ from this information regarding ring gap positioning, follow the ring manufacturers instructions. Fig. Fig. 9: Identifying the rings by the chamfered edge Fig. Fig. 10: Ring identification and general arrangement Fig. Fig. 11: Exact ring positioning on the piston ROD BEARING REPLACEMENT See Figures 12, 13 and 14 1. Inspect the rod bearings for scoring, chipping or other wear. 2. Inspect the crankshaft rod bearing journal for wear. Measure the journal diameter in several locations around the journal and compare to specification. If the crankshaft journal is scored or has deep ridges, or its diameter is below specification, the crankshaft must be removed from the engine and reground. Consult an automotive machine shop. 3. If the crankshaft journal appears usable, clean it and the rod bearing shells until they are completely free of oil. Blow any oil from the oil hole in the crankshaft. The journal surfaces and bearing shells must be completely free of oil to get an accurate reading with Plastigage®. 4. Place a strip of Plastigage® lengthwise along the bottom center of the lower bearing shell, then install the cap with the shell and torque the connecting rod nuts to specification. Do not turn the crankshaft with the Plastigage® installed in the bearing. 5. Remove the bearing cap with the shell. The flattened Plastigage® will either be sticking to the bearing shell or the crankshaft journal. 6. Using the printed scale on the Plastigage® package, measure the flattened Plastigage® at its widest point. The number on the scale that most closely corresponds to the width of the Plastigage® indicates the bearing clearance in thousandths of an inch or hundreths of a millimeter. 7. Compare your findings with the bearing clearance specification. If the bearing clearance is excessive, the bearing must be replaced or the crankshaft must be ground and the bearing replaced. If the crankshaft is still at standard size (has not been ground undersize), bearing shell sets of 0.001, (0.0254mm) 0.002 (0.050mm) and 0.003 in. (0.0762mm) over standard size are available to correct excessive bearing clearance. 8. After clearance measuring is completed, be sure to remove the Plastigage® from the crankshaft and/or bearing shell. 9. For final bearing shell installation, make sure the connecting rod and rod cap bearing saddles are clean and free of nicks or burrs. Install the bearing shells in the connecting rod, making sure the bearing shell tangs are seated in the notches. Be careful when handling any plain bearings. Your hands and the working area should be clean. Dirt is easily embedded in the bearing surface and the bearings are easily scratched or damaged. Fig. Fig. 12: Checking rod bearing clearance using Plastigage® Fig. Fig. 13: Connecting rod bearing identification and selection-Vigor Fig. Fig. 14: Connecting rod bearing identification and selection-2.5L (V6), 2.7L and 3.2L engines INSTALLATION See Figures 15, 16 and 17 1. Make sure the cylinder bore and crankshaft journal are clean. 2. Position the crankshaft journal at its furthest position away from the bottom of the cylinder bore. 3. Coat the cylinder bore with light engine oil. 4. Make sure the rod bearing shells are correctly installed. Install the rubber hoses over the connecting rod bolts to protect the crankshaft during installation. 5. Make sure the piston rings are properly installed and the ring end gaps are correctly positioned. Install a piston ring compressor over the piston and rings and compress the piston rings into their grooves. Follow the ring compressor manufacturers instructions. 6. Place the piston and connecting rod assembly into the cylinder bore. Make sure the assembly is the correct one for that bore and that the piston and connecting rod are facing in the proper direction. Most pistons have an arrow or notch on the top of the piston, or the letter F appears somewhere on the piston to indicate "front", meaning this side should face the front of the engine. 7. Make sure the ring compressor is seated squarely on the block deck surface. If the compressor is not seated squarely, a ring could pop out from beneath the compressor and hang up on the deck surface, as the piston is tapped into the bore, possibly breaking the ring. 8. Make sure that the connecting rod is not hung up on the crankshaft counterweights and is in position to come straight on to the crankshaft. 9. Tap the piston slowly into the bore, making sure the compressor remains squarely against the block deck. When the piston is completely in the bore, remove the ring compressor. 10. Coat the crankshaft journal and the bearing shells with engine assembly lube or clean engine oil. Pull the connecting rod onto the crankshaft journal. After the rod is seated, remove the rubber hoses from the rod bolts. 11. Install the rod bearing cap. Lightly oil the connecting rod bolt threads and install the rod nuts. Torque to specification. 12. After each piston and connecting rod assembly is installed, turn the crankshaft over several times and check for binding. If there is a problem and the crankshaft will not turn, or turns with great difficulty, it will be easier to find the problem (rod cap on backwards, broken ring, etc.) than if all the assemblies are installed. 13. Check the clearance between the sides of the connecting rods and the crankshaft using a feeler gauge. Spread the rods slightly with a screwdriver to insert the gauge. If the clearance is below the minimum specification, the connecting rod will have to be removed and machined to provide adequate clearance. If the clearance is excessive, substitute an unworn rod and recheck. If the clearance is still excessive, the crankshaft must be welded and reground, or replaced. 14. Install the oil pump, oil pan and cylinder head(s). 15. Install the engine in the vehicle. Fig. Fig. 15: Installing the piston into the block Fig. Fig. 16: Piston must be installed in the proper position Fig. Fig. 17: Using a ring compressor to ease piston installation Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Radiator REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print See Figures 1, 2 and 3 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. 2. Drain the cooling system. 3. On some models, it may be necessary to remove the front under protection panel to gain access to the lower radiator and shroud mounting bolts. 4. Disconnect the thermo-switch wire and the fan motor wire. The fans can be removed with the radiator as an assembly. 5. Disconnect the upper and lower hoses at the radiator. If equipped with an automatic transaxle, disconnect and plug the cooling lines at the bottom of the radiator. 6. Remove the hoses to the coolant reservoir. 7. Remove the radiator bracket bolts and lift the assembly out. To install: 8. Install the fan to the radiator; then install the fan and radiator assembly into the vehicle. 9. Fill the cooling system. When filling the system, open the bleeder on the thermostat housing. On Vigor, there is a second bleeder near the fuel pressure regulator. 10. Connect the negative battery cable. Start the engine and watch the coolant level in the radiator. It will probably require more coolant as the engine warms up. Fig. Fig. 1: Radiator and cooling fan mounting-Integra Fig. Fig. 2: Radiator and cooling fan mounting-Legend Fig. Fig. 3: Radiator and cooling fan mounting-Vigor Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Rear Main Seal See Figure 1 Print REMOVAL & INSTALLATION 1. Remove the oil pan and the transaxle from the vehicle. 2. If equipped with a manual transaxle, perform the following procedures: A. Matchmark the pressure plate-to-flywheel. B. Insert the clutch alignment tool or equivalent, into the pilot bearing. C. Remove the pressure plate-to-flywheel bolts (gradually), the pressure and the clutch plate. D. Remove the flywheel-to-crankshaft bolts and the flywheel. 3. If equipped with an automatic transaxle, remove the flexplate-to-flywheel bolts and the flexplate. 4. Remove the rear oil seal housing-to-engine bolts and the gasket. 5. Using a prybar, pry the oil seal from the housing. To install: 6. Clean the gasket mounting surfaces. Check the flywheel or flexplate for cracks and/or damage; replace it, if necessary. 7. Using an oil seal installation tool or equivalent, drive the new oil seal into the rear oil seal housing until it seats. 8. Apply liquid gasket on the gasket mounting surface. Using oil, lubricate the oil seal lips. 9. Install the oil seal housing and torque the bolts to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm); be careful not to damage the oil seal lip. 10. To complete the installation, reverse the removal procedures. Torque the flywheel-to-crankshaft bolts in a cross pattern to 54 ft. lbs. (75 Nm) for automatic transaxles or 76 ft. lbs. (105 Nm) for manual transaxles. Refill the crankcase, start the engine and check for leaks. Fig. Fig. 1: Installing the rear main seal-V6 engines Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Repairing Damaged Threads See Figures 1 through 6 Print Several methods of repairing damaged threads are available. Heli-Coil® (shown here), Keenserts® and Microdot® are among the most widely used. All involved basically the same principle - drilling out stripped threads, tapping the hole and installing a pre-wound insert - making welding, plugging and oversize fasteners unnecessary. Two types of thread repair inserts are usually supplied: a standard type for most Inch Coarse, Inch Fine, Metric Coarse and Metric Fine thread sizes and a spark plug type to fit most spark plug port sizes. Consult the individual manufacturer's catalog to determine exact applications. Typical thread repair kits will contain a selection of prewound threaded inserts, a tap (corresponding to the outside diameter threads of the insert) and an installation tool. Spark plug inserts usually differ because they require a tap equipped with pilot threads and a combined reamer/tap section. Most manufacturers also supply blister-packed thread repair inserts separately in addition to a master kit containing a variety of taps and inserts plus installation tools. Fig. Fig. 1: Damaged bolt holes can be repaired with thread repair inserts Fig. Fig. 2: Standard thread repair insert (left) and a spark plug repair insert (right) Fig. Fig. 3: Drill out the damaged threads with the specified drill bit. Drill completely through the hole to or to the bottom of a blind hole Fig. Fig. 4: With the tap supplied in the thread repair kit, tap the hole to receive the insert. Keep the tap well oiled and back it out often to clear the threads Fig. Fig. 5: Screw the thread insert onto the installation tool and until the tang engages the slot. Screw the insert into the tapped hole until it is just below the top. After installation break off the tang Fig. Fig. 6: Standard torque specifications and fastener markings Before effecting a repair to a threaded hole, remove any snapped, broken or damaged bolts or studs. Penetrating oil can be used to free frozen threads; the offending item can be removed with locking pliers or with a screw or stud extractor. After the hole is clear, the thread can be repaired, as follows: CHECKING ENGINE COMPRESSION A noticeable lack of engine power, excessive oil consumption and/or poor fuel mileage measured over an extended period are all indicators of internal engine wear. Worn piston rings, scored or worn cylinder bores, blown head gaskets, sticking or burnt valves and worn valve seats are all possible culprits here. A check of each cylinder's compression will help you locate the problems. As mentioned in the "Tools and Equipment" section of Routine Maintenance , a screw-in type compression gauge is more accurate than the type you simply hold against the spark plug hole, although it takes slightly longer to use. It's worth it to obtain a more accurate reading. Follow the procedures below. All Engines 1. Warm the engine to normal operating temperatures. 2. Remove all spark plugs. 3. Disconnect the high tension lead from the ignition coil. 4. On carbureted vehicles, fully open the throttle either by operating the carburetor throttle linkage by hand or by having an assistant "floor" the accelerator pedal. On the fuel injected vehicles, disconnect the cold start valve and all injector connections. 5. Screw the compression gauge into the No. 1 spark plug hole until the fitting is snug. Be careful not to cross thread the plug hole. On aluminum cylinder heads use extra care, as the threads in these heads are easily ruined. 6. Ask an assistant to depress the accelerator pedal fully on both carbureted and fuel injected vehicles. Then, while you read the compression gauge, ask the assistant to crank the engine two or three times in short bursts using the ignition switch. 7. Read the compression gauge at the end of each series of cranks and record the highest of these readings. Repeat this procedure for each of the engine's cylinders. Compare the highest reading of each cylinder to the compression pressure specifications in the "Tune-Up Specifications" chart in Engine Electrical . The specs in this chart are maximum values. A cylinder's compression pressure is usually acceptable if it is not less than 80% of maximum. The difference between each cylinder should be no more than 12-14 pounds. 8. If a cylinder is unusually low, pour a tablespoon of clean engine oil into the cylinder through the spark plug hole and repeat the compression test. If the compression comes up after adding the oil, it appears that the cylinder's piston rings or bore are damaged or worn. If the pressure remains low, the valves may not be seating properly (a valve job is needed) or the head gasket may be blown near that cylinder. If compression in any two adjacent cylinders is low and if the addition of oil doesn't help the compression, there is leakage past the head gasket. Oil and coolant water in the combustion chamber can result from this problem. There may be evidence of water droplets on the engine dipstick when a head gasket has blown. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Rocker Arms and Shafts Refer to "Camshaft" removal and installation later in this section for rocker arm and shaft service. Print Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Sending Units, Switches and Sensors The location and testing of all sensors and switches can be found in Chassis Electrical of this repair guide. Print Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Starter The starter is located on the firewall side of the engine block, adjacent to the flywheel or torque converter housing. Early models, use a direct Print drive type starter, while the later models use a gear reduction starter. Otherwise, the two units are similar in operation and service. Both starters are 4-pole, series wound, DC units to which an outboard solenoid is mounted. When the ignition switch is turned to the start position, the solenoid armature is drawn in, engaging the starter pinion with the flywheel. When the starter pinion and flywheel are fully engaged, the solenoid armature closes the main contacts for the starter, causing the starter to crank the engine. When the engine starts, the increased speed of the flywheel causes the gear to overrun the starter clutch and rotor. The gear continues in full mesh until the ignition is switched from the start to the on position, interrupting the starter current. The shift lever spring then returns the gear to its neutral position. REMOVAL & INSTALLATION See Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4 Fig. Fig. 1: Starter mounting-Integra Fig. Fig. 2: Starter mounting-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 3: Starter mounting-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 4: Starter mounting-Vigor 1. Disconnect the battery negative cable. On Vigor, remove the intake manifold bracket. 2. On 1991-93 Legend, it may be necessary to remove the exhaust pipe near the starter. 3. At the starter motor, label and disconnect the wiring. 4. Remove the starter-to-engine bolts and the starter. To install: 5. Position the starter to the engine and torque the mounting bolts on the Integra and 1986-90 Legend to 32 ft. lbs. (45 Nm), the upper mounting bolts on the Vigor to 32 ft. lbs. (45 Nm) and the lower bolts to 54 ft. lbs. (75 Nm). Tighten the mounting bolts on the 1991-93 Legend to 54 ft. lbs. (75 Nm). Connect the wiring to the starter. 6. If the exhaust pipe was removed, install it. On Vigor, install the intake manifold bracket. 7. Connect the cables to the battery. Check the starter operation. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Thermostat REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print See Figures 1, 2 and 3 1. Drain the cooling system and remove the lower radiator hose from the thermostat housing. 2. Remove the thermostat housing bolts, the housing and the thermostat. 3. Clean the gasket mounting surfaces. 4. To install, use new gaskets and reverse the removal procedures; install the thermostat's spring end toward the engine. Torque the housing bolts to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm). 5. Refill and bleed the cooling system. Fig. Fig. 1: Thermostat replacement-Integra Fig. Fig. 2: Thermostat replacement-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 3: Thermostat replacement-Vigor Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Timing Belt And Tensioner ADJUSTMENT Print Integra and Vigor Always adjust the timing belt tension with the engine cold. The tensioner is spring-loaded to apply the proper tension to the belt automatically after making the following adjustments. 1. Turn the crankshaft pulley until the No. 1 piston is at TDC of the compression stroke. 2. Loosen the adjusting bolt on the tensioner pulley. 3. Rotate the crankshaft counterclockwise 3 teeth on the camshaft pulley to create tension on the timing belt. 4. Torque the adjusting bolt on the tensioner pulley to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm). 5. If the crankshaft pulley bolt broke loose while turning the crank, torque it as follows: A. 1986-90 Integra: 119 ft. lbs. (161 Nm) B. 1991-93 Integra: 130 ft. lbs. (180 Nm) C. Vigor: 181 ft. lbs. (250 Nm) Legend Always adjust the timing belt tension with the engine cold. The tensioner is spring-loaded to apply the proper tension to the belt automatically after making the following adjustments. 1. Turn the crankshaft pulley until No. 1 is at TDC of the compression stroke. 2. Rotate the crankshaft clockwise 9 teeth on the camshaft pulley. The blue mark on the camshaft pulley should line up with the pointer on the lower cover. 3. Loosen the adjusting bolt about 1 / 2 turn. The spring will automatically provide the correct belt tension. 4. Torque the adjusting bolt to 31 ft. lbs. (43 Nm). REMOVAL & INSTALLATION 1986-90 Integra See Figures 1 and 2 1. Rotate the crankshaft pulley until No. 1 piston is at TDC of the compression stroke. 2. Remove the alternator belt, the power steering belt, and the air conditioning belt, crankshaft pulley and timing belt cover. Mark the direction of the belt rotation. 3. Loosen the tensioner adjusting bolt 1 / 2 turn, push the tensioner pulley to release belt tension, then tighten the bolt again. 4. Slide the timing belt off the camshaft sprockets, crankshaft sprocket and the water pump sprocket; remove it from the engine. 5. Inspect the timing belt; replace it if it is worn. If it is oil soaked, replace it and find the source of the oil leak. Check the condition of the water pump. To install: 6. Make sure the camshaft and crankshaft are properly positioned, install the new belt and adjust the tension. 7. Temporarily install the crankshaft pulley and bolt and turn the engine 2 full revolutions. Check that the crankshaft pulley and camshaft sprocket marks are still properly aligned. If not, adjust as necessary. 8. When the timing belt is properly installed and adjusted, remove the crankshaft pulley, install the timing belt cover and install the pulley. Torque the bolt to 119 ft. lbs. (161 Nm). Fig. Fig. 1: Timing belt and cover assembly mounting-1986-90 Integra Fig. Fig. 2: Timing mark positioning for timing belt installation-1986-90 Integra 1991-93 Integra See Figures 3, 4 and 5 1. Raise and safely support the vehicle. Remove the left front wheel and remove the wheel well splash guard. 2. Remove the power steering belt and power steering pump. Do not disconnect the power steering fluid lines. 3. Remove the air conditioning belt and the alternator belt. 4. Remove the left side engine mount. 5. Remove the valve cover. 6. Remove the middle timing belt cover. 7. Set the crankshaft to TDC of the No. 1 piston: the white crankshaft pulley mark should be aligned with the pointer on the cover and the camshaft sprockets UP mark should be facing upward, sprocket timing marks aligned. 8. Remove the special crankshaft pulley bolt and the crankshaft pulley. 9. Remove the lower timing belt cover. Fig. Fig. 3: Timing belt and cover assembly mounting-1991-93 Integra Fig. Fig. 4: Timing mark positioning for timing belt installation-1991-93 Integra 1.8L Fig. Fig. 5: Timing mark positioning for timing belt installation-1991-93 Integra 1.7L 10. Loosen but do not remove the tensioner adjusting bolt, push the tensioner to slacken the timing belt, then retighten the bolt. If the timing belt is to be reinstalled, mark the direction of rotation. Remove the timing belt. To install: 11. Install the timing belt with the No. 1 piston at TDC on its compression stroke. To set the camshafts to the top dead center position for No. 1 cylinder, align the hole in the camshafts with the holes in the No. 1 camshaft holders and push a 5.0mm pin punches into the holes. 12. Install the timing belt. If installing the old belt, make sure it is turning the same direction. 13. Make sure the timing belt is properly installed on the crankshaft and that the front oil seal does not leak. Replace the cover and crankshaft pulley and carefully oil the threads of the pulley bolt without getting oil on the washer. Torque the bolt in 3 steps: 145 ft. lbs. (200 Nm), then loosen the bolt completely, then re-torque to 130 ft. lbs. (180 Nm). 1 14. Make sure the camshaft sprockets and crankshaft pulley are properly aligned with the timing marks. Loosen the tensioner bolt about 1 / 2 turn, then torque to 40 ft. lbs. (55 Nm). Tension adjustment is automatically accomplished with the spring on the tensioner. Check timing mark alignment again. 15. Install the remaining parts in reverse order. Torque the engine mount-to-engine bolt and nut to 54 ft. lbs. (75 Nm), torque the mount-to-body bolt to 40 ft. lbs. (55 Nm). 1986-90 Legend See Figures 6 and 7 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Remove the pulley cover and the harness cover from above the timing belt upper cover. 2. Remove the engine sub-harness clamp. 3. Remove the engine support bolts, loosen the side mount rubber and raise the side mount bracket. A suitable lifting device or chain hoist should be used to raise and support the engine. Do not jack on the oil pan. 4. Remove the lower splash guard. 5. Loosen the air conditioning idler pulley adjusting bolt and remove the compressor belt. 6. Remove the alternator adjusting bolt, the mounting bolt, the drive belt and the alternator. 7. Remove the power steering pump bolt, the mounting bolt, the drive belt and the power steering pump. It may be necessary to disconnect the hydraulic hoses. 8. Remove the front and rear upper covers. 9. Make sure the crankshaft is set to TDC No. 1 piston. Remove the special bolt and the crankshaft pulley. 10. Remove the lower cover. 11. Loosen but do not remove the tensioner adjusting bolt, push the tensioner to slacken the timing belt, then retighten the bolt. If the timing belt is to be reinstalled, mark the direction of rotation. Remove the timing belt. Do not rotate the crankshaft or camshafts with the belt removed. The pistons will contact the valves and cause engine damage. 12. Inspect the timing belt. Replace it if it is oil soaked or worn. Find and repair the source of the oil leak. To install: 13. If the crankshaft or camshafts have been turned with the timing belt removed, remove the spark plugs and advance the crankshaft about 15 degrees beyond TDC of No. 1 cylinder. Make sure the camshaft sprockets are properly aligned with the marks and return the crankshaft to the TDC mark. 14. Install the belt in sequence on the crankshaft, the front camshaft, water pump and tensioner pulleys, then the rear camshaft. 15. To adjust the tension, loosen the tensioner pulley bolt about 1 / 2 turn. The spring will automatically set the proper tension. Torque the bolt to 31 ft. lbs. (43 Nm). 16. Rotate the crankshaft 6 turns clockwise and check that the timing marks on the crankshaft and camshafts align properly. Adjust the timing belt tension again by rotating the crankshaft to the align the blue mark on the pulley with the pointer. Loosen and retorque the tensioner pulley bolt. 17. Install the remaining parts in reverse order. Torque the crankshaft pulley bolt to 83 ft. lbs. (115 Nm). When installing the side mount bracket, torque the bolts to 40 ft. lbs. (55 Nm). Fig. Fig. 6: Timing belt and cover assembly mounting-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 7: Timing mark positioning for timing belt installation-1986-90 Legend 1991-93 Legend See Figures 8 and 9 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. 2. Remove the engine wiring harness covers and the wiring harness from the front of the engine. 3. Remove the breather pipe and vacuum pipe bracket. 4. Remove the drive belts for the alternator, air conditioner and power steering pump. 5. Remove the upper timing belt covers. 6. Rotate the crankshaft to TDC No. 1 piston. The white mark on the crankshaft pulley will be aligned with the pointer on the lower cover, and the camshaft sprocket marks will be aligned with the yellow marks on the rear covers. 7. Remove the crankshaft pulley and the air conditioner belt tensioner pulley. 8. Remove the dip stick tube. Remove the lower timing belt cover. 9. Loosen the timing belt tensioner pulley bolt about 1 / 2 turn and push the pulley to slacken the belt tension. Tighten the bolt and remove the belt. If the belt is to be reinstalled, mark the direction of rotation. Do not rotate the crankshaft or camshafts with the belt removed. The pistons will contact the valves and cause engine damage. To install: 10. If the belt is worn or oil soaked, it must be replaced. Find and repair the source of the oil leak before installing a new belt. 11. If the crankshaft or camshafts have been turned with the timing belt removed, remove the spark plugs and advance the crankshaft about 15 degrees beyond TDC of No. 1 cylinder. Make sure the camshaft sprockets are properly aligned with the marks and return the crankshaft to the TDC mark. 12. Install the belt in sequence on the crankshaft, adjuster pulley, the left camshaft, water pump, then the right camshaft. 13. To adjust the tension, loosen the tensioner pulley bolt about 1 / 2 turn. The spring will automatically set the proper tension. Torque the bolt to 31 ft. lbs. (43 Nm). 14. Rotate the crankshaft 6 turns clockwise and check that the timing marks on the crankshaft and camshafts align properly. Adjust the timing belt tension again by rotating the crankshaft to the align the blue mark on the pulley with the pointer. Loosen and retorque the tensioner pulley bolt. 15. When installing the crankshaft pulley, oil the threads of the bolt without getting oil on the washer. Torque the bolt to 174 ft. lbs. (240 Nm). 16. Installation of the remaining parts is the reverse of removal. Fig. Fig. 8: Timing belt and cover assembly mounting-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 9: Timing mark positioning for timing belt installation-1991-93 Legend Vigor See Figures 10 and 11 The radio is equipped with a theft protection program. Be sure the 5 digit security code is available before disconnecting the battery. 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. 2. Label and disconnect the engine wiring as required. 3. Loosen the adjusting bolts and remove the accessory drive belts. 4. Remove the cylinder head cover. 5. Remove the timing belt upper cover. 6. Rotate the crankshaft to align the white timing mark on the crankshaft pulley with the pointer on the lower cover. Make sure the UP mark and the TDC marks on the camshaft sprocket are correctly positioned. 7. Remove the center bolt from the crankshaft and remove the crankshaft pulley. 8. Turn the crankshaft to align the white TDC mark with the pointer, then remove the lower timing belt cover. Make sure the UP mark on the camshaft sprocket is correctly positioned. 9. Mark the direction of rotation of the timing belt. Loosen the tensioner and remove the belt. To install: 10. Install the belt on the crankshaft sprocket, tensioner, water pump, then the camshaft sprocket. If the old belt is being installed, make sure it will turn the same direction. 11. Loosen the tensioner bolt to allow the spring to set the tension, then tighten the bolt. Rotate the crankshaft 6 full turns to seat the belt and make sure the timing marks align properly. 12. Install the lower cover but do not fully tighten the bolts yet. 13. Install the crankshaft pulley and without getting oil on the washer, oil the threads on the bolt. Torque the bolt to 181 ft. lbs. (250 Nm). 14. Install the upper cover and tighten the bolts for both covers. 15. Install the cylinder head cover with new gaskets and O-rings as required. 16. Install and adjust the accessory drive belts. 17. After connecting the battery, enter the radio security code. Fig. Fig. 10: Timing belt and cover assembly mounting-Vigor Fig. Fig. 11: Timing mark positioning for timing belt installation-Vigor Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Timing Belt Front Cover REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print 1986-89 Integra 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable and remove the upper timing belt cover. 2. Rotate the crankshaft to the white timing mark on the pulley, indicating the No. 1 piston is at TDC. The camshaft sprockets UP mark should be facing upward with the alignment marks aligned with the top of the cylinder head. 3. Loosen the alternator and remove the drive belt(s). 4. Remove the crankshaft pulley bolt and the crankshaft pulley. 5. Remove the lower timing belt cover bolts and the cover. To install: 6. Reverse the removal procedures. Make sure the timing belt and the front oil seal are properly installed on the crankshaft before replacing the cover. 7. Install the lower cover but don't fully tighten the bolts yet. Install the crankshaft pulley and torque the bolt to 83 ft. lbs. (115 Nm). 8. Install the upper cover and tighten the bolts for both covers. 9. Install the alternator belt and tension it properly. 1991-93 Integra 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable and remove the upper timing belt cover. 2. Rotate the crankshaft to the white timing mark on the pulley, indicating the No. 1 piston is at TDC. The camshaft sprockets UP mark should be facing upward with the alignment marks aligned with the top of the cylinder head. 3. Raise and safely support the vehicle and remove the left front wheel and splash shield. 4. Remove the power steering belt and power steering pump. Do not disconnect the power steering fluid lines. 5. Remove the air conditioning belt and the alternator belt. 6. Remove the engine support bolts and nut, then remove the side mount rubber. 7. Remove the valve cover. 8. Remove the middle timing cover. 9. Remove the special crankshaft pulley bolt and the crankshaft pulley. 10. Remove the lower timing belt cover. To install: 11. Install the lower cover and crankshaft pulley. Carefully oil the threads of the pulley bolt without getting oil on the washer. 12. Torque the bolt in 3 steps: to 145 ft. lbs. (200 Nm), then loosen it again, then re-torque to 130 ft. lbs. (180 Nm). 13. The remaining installation is the reverse order of removal. 1986-90 Legend 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Rotate the crankshaft to align the crankshaft pulley or flywheel pointer, at Top Dead Center (TDC); the camshaft sprocket notches should align with the marks on the rear timing belt cover. 2. Remove the pulley cover and harness cover from above the timing belt upper cover. 3. Remove the engine sub harness clip. 4. Remove the engine support bolts, loosen the side mount rubber, and raise the side mount bracket. When supporting the engine, do not jack on the oil pan. 5. Remove the lower splash guard from under the front of the vehicle. 6. Loosen the air conditioning idler pulley adjusting bolt and remove the air conditioning compressor belt. 7. Remove the alternator adjusting bolt, mounting bolt and remove the alternator with the belt. 8. Remove the power steering pump adjusting bolt, mounting bolt and remove the power steering pump with the belt. 9. Remove the front and rear upper covers. 10. Remove the special crankshaft pulley bolt and remove the crankshaft pulley. 11. Remove the lower timing belt cover. To install: 12. Installation is the reverse of removal. Make sure the timing belt and oil seal are properly installed before replacing the lower cover. 13. Install the lower belt cover but don't tighten the bolts yet. 14. Install the crankshaft pulley and torque the bolt to 123 ft. lbs. (170 Nm). 15. Install the remaining timing belt covers and tighten all bolts. 16. Install the power steering pump and alternator and properly tension the belts. 17. Install and tension the air conditioner belt. 18. Set the engine in place and install the engine side mount bracket bolts. 19. Secure the wiring in place and install the lower splash shield. 1991-93 Legend 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. 2. Remove the engine wire harness covers at the front of the engine. 3. Label and disconnect the wiring harness. 4. Remove the breather pipe and vacuum pipe bracket. 5. Remove the alternator, air conditioning and power steering belts. 6. Remove the timing belt upper covers and turn the crankshaft pulley to the TDC No.1 cylinder mark. 7. Remove the crankshaft pulley. 8. Remove the air conditioner belt tensioner pulley. 9. Remove the dip stick tube and the lower timing belt cover. To install: 10. Make sure the rubber seals and cover are clean and dry and install the lower cover. 11. Carefully oil the threads of the pulley bolt without getting oil on the washer. Install the crankshaft pulley and torque the bolt to 174 ft. lbs. (240 Nm). 12. Use a new O-ring to install the dip stick tube. 13. Install and adjust the drive belts for the air conditioner, power steering and alternator. 14. Install the upper timing belt covers, breather pipe and the wiring harness. Vigor The radio is equipped with a theft protection program. Be sure the 5 digit security code is available before disconnecting the battery. 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. 2. Label and disconnect the engine wiring as required. 3. Loosen the adjusting bolts and remove the accessory drive belts. 4. Remove the cylinder head cover. 5. Remove the timing belt upper cover. 6. Rotate the crankshaft to align the white timing mark on the crankshaft pulley with the pointer on the lower cover. Make sure the UP mark and the TDC marks on the camshaft sprocket are correctly positioned. 7. Remove the center bolt from the crankshaft and remove the crankshaft pulley. 8. Remove the lower timing belt cover. To install: 9. Install the lower cover but do not fully tighten the bolts yet. 10. Install the crankshaft pulley and without getting oil on the washer, oil the threads on the bolt. Torque the bolt to 181 ft. lbs. (250 Nm). 11. Install the upper cover and tighten the bolts for both covers. 12. Install the cylinder head cover with new gaskets and O-rings as required. 13. Install and adjust the accessory drive belts. 14. After connecting the battery, enter the radio security code. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Tools The tools required for an engine overhaul or parts replacement will depend on the depth of your involvement. With a few exceptions, they will be the tools found in a mechanic's tool kit (see Routine Maintenance ). More in depth work will require any or all of the following: Print a dial indicator (reading in thousandths) mounted on a universal base micrometers and telescope gauges jaw and screw-type pullers scraper valve spring compressor ring groove cleaner piston ring expander and compressor ridge reamer cylinder hone or glaze breaker Plastigage® engine stand Use of most of these tools is illustrated in this Section. Many can be rented for a one-time use from a local parts jobber or tool supply house specializing in automotive work. Occasionally, the use of special tools is called for. See the information on Special Tools and the Safety Notice in the front of this guide substituting another tool. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Valve Guides If replacement valve guides are not available or you determine the replacement procedure is too involved, the guides can be reconditioned using a procedure known as knurling (machining the inner surface). Print REMOVAL & INSTALLATION 1. Refer to the "Valve, Removal and Installation" procedures in this section and remove the valves. 2. Place the cylinder head in an oven and heat it to 300°F; this procedure will loosen the valve guides enough to drive them out. 3. Place the new valve guides in the freezer section of a refrigerator for about an hour; this contraction procedure will make them easier to install. 4. Using a hammer and a valve guide driver tool or equivalent, drive the valve guide(s) toward the camshaft side of the cylinder head. 5. Using a hammer and the valve guide driver or equivalent, remove the new guide from the freezer and drive it into the cylinder head from the camshaft side until the guide projects 15.5mm above the cylinder head surface. 6. Using the valve guide reamer tool or equivalent, coat the reamer with cutting oil and ream the valve guides to the proper valve stem fit. Use the reamer with an in-out motion while rotating it. For the finished dimension of the valve guide, check the "Valve Specifications" chart. Do not forget to install the valve guide seals. 7. To assemble, reverse the disassembly procedures. 8. To complete the installation, use new gaskets and reverse the removal procedures. Refill the cooling system. Start the engine and check for leaks. KNURLING Knurling is a process in which the metal on the valve guide bore is displaced and raised, thereby reducing the clearance. It also provides excellent oil control. The option of knurling rather than reaming valve guides should be discussed with a reputable machinist or engine specialist. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Valve Lifters REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print 1986-90 Legend 1. Remove the camshafts as described in the camshaft section. 2. With the camshafts removed, remove the rocker arms and the pushrods. 3. Use a suitable valve lifter removal tool and remove the hydraulic tappet (lifter) from the cylinder head hydraulic tappet mounting hole. 4. Use the following steps to inspect the hydraulic tappet (lifter). A. Inspect the hydraulic tappet for wear or damage or for a clogged oil hole. B. Measure the free length of each hydraulic tappet by attaching the hydraulic tappet bleeder to the tappet. Then push and release the bleeder slowly while in a container filled with 10W-30W engine oil. Be sure to keep the hydraulic tappet upright and below the surface of the oil while pushing and release the bleeder. C. Continue operating the bleeder until there are no air bubbles left in the hydraulic tappet. D. Remove the hydraulic tappet and try to compress it quickly by hand. Measure the compression stroke with a dial indicator on a surface plate. The standard compression stroke measurement should be 0.0004-0.003 in. (0.01-0.08mm). To install: 5. Pour engine oil into the cylinder head hydraulic tappet mounting hole, up to the level of the oil path. 6. Install the hydraulic tappet into the cylinder head. Do not rotate the hydraulic tappet while inserting it into the head. 7. Pour engine oil into the oil fillers on the cylinder head. 8. Install the pushrods and rocker arms. Be sure to install each part in its original position. Loosen the rocker arm adjusting screws and locknuts before installation. 9. Install the camshafts and camshaft oil seals. Be sure to take note of the locations of the camshafts; the front camshaft has a groove for driving the distributor. Adjust the exhaust valve clearance. 10. After the heads are reassembled, make sure the engine sits for approximately 5 minutes to allow the hydraulic tappets to reach the proper oil level. 11. Remove the spark plugs and crank the engine, feel for compression at each cylinder at the spark plug holes. It may be necessary to crank the engine through several cycles to confirm compression. 12. If any cylinder does not have compression, it may be necessary to disassemble the head and check the suspected tappet. 13. If all cylinders have compression, reinstall the plugs and start the engine. 1991-93 Legend 1. Remove the cylinder head cover. 2. The hydraulic lifters are in the rocker arms where they contact the valves. Each rocker arm has a letter A or B stamped into the side. Before disassembling the rocker arms, note the position of each letter so they can be reassembled the same way. 3. Remove the rocker arm assembly using the torque sequence described in the section on camshaft removal. This is important to avoid bending the rocker arm shafts. 4. Do not remove the hydraulic tappets unless they are to be replaced, they cannot be repaired or tested. Handle the rocker arms carefully so the oil does not drain out of the lifters. If replacing the lifters, also replace the O-ring. To install: 5. Place a new camshaft seal on the end of the camshaft, lubricate the journals and set the camshaft in place on the head. 6. Apply liquid gasket to the mating surfaces of the end camshaft holders. 7. Set the rocker arm assemblies in place and start all the bolts. Make sure the rocker arms are properly positioned and turn each bolt in the correct sequence, 2 turns at a time till the holders are seated on the head. This is the only way to avoid damaging the valves or rocker assemblies. 8. When all the camshaft and rocker holders are seated, torque the bolts in the same sequence. Torque the 8mm bolts to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm) and the 6mm bolts to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm). Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Valve Seats The valve seats can be machined during a valve job to provide optimum sealing between the valve and the seat.The seating services should be performed by a professional machine shop which has the specialized knowledge and tools necessary to perform the service. Print Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Valve Springs If the cylinder head is removed from the engine, refer to the "Valves, Removal and Installation" procedures in this section and remove the valve springs. Print REMOVAL & INSTALLATION 1. Refer to the "Rocker Arm, Removal and Installation" procedures in this section and remove the rocker arm assembly. 2. Using an old set of rocker arm shafts, install them in place of the rocker arm assembly; this will prevent bending or scratching the original set of shafts. 3. Remove the spark plug(s) from the cylinder head. 4. Rotate the crankshaft to position the cylinder (being worked on) to the TDC of its compression stroke. 5. Using a Spark Plug Air Hold tool, install it into the spark plug hold and inject compressed air into the cylinder to hold the valves in place. 6. Using the Spring Compressor tool, compress the spring(s) and remove the valve keepers. Relax the spring compressor tool, then, remove the valve retainer, the spring(s) and the valve seal; keep the parts in the order for reinstallation purposes. If reusing the valve seals, it is recommended to replace the neck springs of the seal; the black spring is used on the exhaust valve seal and the white spring is used on the intake valve seal. The seals are not interchangeable between the intake and the exhaust valves. 7. Inspect the springs for fatigue, cracks and/or uniformity; if necessary, replace them. Using a putty knife, clean the gasket mounting surfaces. 8. To assemble, use new seals (if necessary) and reverse the disassembly procedures. Using a plastic mallet, tap the valve a few times to make sure the valve keepers are seated correctly. When installing the springs, be sure to position the closely wound coils ends or painted part toward the cylinder head. 9. To install, use new gaskets, seals and reverse the removal procedures. Start the engine and check for leaks. INSPECTION 1. Position the valve spring on a flat, clean surface next to a square. 2. Rotate the spring against the square to measure the distortion (out-of-roundness). If the spring height varies (between similar springs) by more than 1/16 in., replace the spring. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Valves REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print See Figures 1 through 5 1. Refer to the "Cylinder Head, Removal and Installation" and the "Camshaft, Removal and Installation" procedures in this section, then, remove the cylinder head from the engine and the camshaft from the cylinder head. 2. Using a plastic mallet, tap each valve stem to loosen the valve keepers. 3. Using a Valve Spring Compressor tool, compress the valve springs, then, remove the valve keepers, retainers and springs. Remove the valves from the opposite side of the cylinder head. Fig. Fig. 1: Removing the valves using a valve spring compressor Fig. Fig. 2: Removing the valve guide seal, using a special remover tool Fig. Fig. 3: Removing the valve guide using a special driver tool Fig. Fig. 4: Using a valve guide reamer Fig. Fig. 5: Valve spring components When removing the valves and components, keep them in order for reinstallation purposes. 4. To replace the valve seals, simply pull the seal from the valve guide. If the valve seals are being reused, it is good idea to replace the springs around the seal's neck. The exhaust valve seal uses a black spring, while the intake valve seal uses a white spring. 5. Inspect the valves for wear, damage and/or cracks. If necessary, reface the valves on a valve grinding machine. When replacing the valve springs, place the closely wound end toward the cylinder head. 6. To assemble the cylinder head, use new valve seals, lubricate the valve parts with clean engine oil and reverse the disassembly procedures. After removing the valve spring compressor, tap the valve stems 2-3 times to make sure the valve keepers and valves are fully seated. CAUTION When removing the valve spring compressor tool, remove it slowly and make sure the valve keepers are fully seated; otherwise, the springs may be fly off. 7. To complete the installation, use new gaskets and install the cylinder head on the vehicle. INSPECTION Inspect the valve faces and seats (in the head) for pits, burned spots and other evidence of poor seating. If a valve face is in such bad shape that the head of the valve must be ground, in order to true the face, discard the valve, because the sharp edge will run too hot. The correct angle for valve faces is 45 degrees. Refacing is best performed by a reputable machine shop. Check the valve stem for scoring and burned spots. If not noticeably scored or damaged, clean the valve stem with solvent to remove all gum and varnish. Clean the valve guides using and an expanding wire-type valve guide cleaner. If you have access to a dial indicator for measuring valve stem-toguide clearance, mount it so the stem of the indicator is at 90 degrees to the valve stem and as closer to the valve guide as possible. Move the valve off its seat, then, measure the valve guide-to-stem clearance by rocking the stem back and for the actuate the dial indicator. Measure the valve stem diameter using a micrometer and compare it to specifications to determine whether the stem or guide wear is responsible for the excess clearance. If a dial indicator and micrometer are not available, take the cylinder head and valves to a reputable machine shop for inspection. REFACING All valve grinding operations should be performed by a qualified machine shop; only the valve lapping operation is recommended to be performed by the inexperienced mechanic. VALVE LAPPING When valve faces and seats have been refaced and/or recut, or if they are determined to be in good condition, the valves must be lapped in to ensure efficient sealing when the valve closes against the seat. 1. Invert the cylinder head so the combustion chambers are facing upward. 2. Lightly lubricate the valve stems with clean engine oil and coat the valve seats with valve grinding compound. Install the valves in the cylinder head as numbered. 3. Using a valve lapping tool, attach the suction cup to a valve head. You will probably have to moisten the suction cup to securely attach the tool to the valve. 4. Rotate the tool between the palms, changing position and lifting the tool often to prevent grooving. Lap the valve until a smooth polished seat is evident (you may have to add a bit more compound after some lapping is done). 5. Remove the valve and tool, then, remove all traces of the grinding compound with a solvent-soaked rag or rinse the head with solvent. Valve lapping can also be done by fastening a suction to a piece of drill rod in a hang egg-beater type drill. Proceed as above, using the drill as a lapping tool. Due to the higher speeds involved when using the hand drill, care must be exercised to avoid grooving the seat. Lift the tool and change direction of rotation often. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Water Pump REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print See Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4 It is necessary to remove the timing belt cover(s) and remove the timing belt from the water pump sprocket, to remove the water pump on all models. This procedure can be found later in this section. A small amount of weeping from the bleed hole in the water pump is considered normal and no cause for replacement. 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. Remove the timing belt. 2. Drain the cooling system. 3. Remove the water pump-to-engine bolts and remove together with the drive sprocket. 4. To install, use a new O-ring and reverse the removal procedures. Torque the 6mm bolts to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm) and 8mm bolts to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). Fig. Fig. 1: Water pump mounting-Integra Fig. Fig. 2: Water pump mounting-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 3: Water pump mounting-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 4: Water pump mounting-Vigor 5. Refill and bleed the cooling system. Start the engine, allow it to reach normal operating temperatures and check for leaks. Check and/or adjust the engine timing. Back to Top Driveability & Emissions Controls Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Composition Of The Exhaust Gases The exhaust gases emitted into the atmosphere are a combination of burned and unburned fuel. To understand the exhaust emission and its composition review some basic chemistry. Print When the air/fuel mixture is introduced into the engine, we are mixing air, composed of nitrogen (78 percent), oxygen (21 percent) and other gases (1 percent) with the fuel, which is 100 percent hydrocarbons (HC), in a semi-controlled ratio. As the combustion process is accomplished, power is produced to move the vehicle while the heat of combustion is transferred to the cooling system. The exhaust gases are then composed of nitrogen, a diatomic gas (N2), the same as was introduced in the engine, carbon dioxide (CO2), the same gas that is used in beverage carbonation and water vapor (H2O). The nitrogen (N2), for the most part passes through the engine unchanged, while the oxygen (O2) reacts (burns) with the hydrocarbons (HC) and produces the carbon dioxide (CO2) and the water vapors (H2O). If this chemical process would be the only process to take place, the exhaust emissions would be harmless. However, during the combustion process, other pollutants are formed and are considered dangerous. These pollutants are carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbons (HC), oxides of nitrogen (NOx) oxides of sulfur (SOx) and engine particulates. Lead (Pb), is considered 1 of the particulates and is present in the exhaust gases whenever leaded fuels are used. Lead (Pb) does not dissipate easily. Levels can be high along roadways when it is emitted from vehicles and can pose a health threat. Since the increased usage of unleaded gasoline and the phasing out of leaded gasoline for fuel, this pollutant is gradually diminishing. While not considered a major threat lead is still considered a dangerous pollutant. HYDROCARBONS Hydrocarbons (HC) are essentially unburned fuel that have not been successfully burned during the combustion process or have escaped into the atmosphere through fuel evaporation. The main sources of incomplete combustion are rich air/fuel mixtures, low engine temperatures and improper spark timing. The main sources of hydrocarbon emission through fuel evaporation come from the vehicle's fuel tank and carburetor bowl. To reduce combustion hydrocarbon emission, engine modifications were made to minimize dead space and surface area in the combustion chamber. In addition the air/fuel mixture was made more lean through improved carburetion, fuel injection and by the addition of external controls to aid in further combustion of the hydrocarbons outside the engine. Two such methods were the addition of an air injection system, to inject fresh air into the exhaust manifolds and the installation of a catalytic converter, a unit that is able to burn traces of hydrocarbons without affecting the internal combustion process or fuel economy. To control hydrocarbon emissions through fuel evaporation, modifications were made to the fuel tank and carburetor bowl to allow storage of the fuel vapors during periods of engine shut-down, and at specific times during engine operation, to purge and burn these same vapors by blending them with the air/fuel mixture. CARBON MONOXIDE Carbon monoxide is formed when not enough oxygen is present during the combustion process to convert carbon (C) to carbon dioxide (CO2). An increase in the carbon monoxide (CO) emission is normally accompanied by an increase in the hydrocarbon (HC) emission because of the lack of oxygen to completely burn all of the fuel mixture. Carbon monoxide (CO) also increases the rate at which the photo chemical smog is formed by speeding up the conversion of nitric oxide (NO) to nitrogen dioxide (NO2). To accomplish this, carbon monoxide (CO) combines with oxygen (O2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) to produce carbon dioxide (CO2) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2). (CO + O2 + NO = CO2 + NO2). The dangers of carbon monoxide, which is an odorless, colorless toxic gas are many. When carbon monoxide is inhaled into the lungs and passed into the blood stream, oxygen is replaced by the carbon monoxide in the red blood cells, causing a reduction in the amount of oxygen being supplied to the many parts of the body. This lack of oxygen causes headaches, lack of coordination, reduced mental alertness and should the carbon monoxide concentration be high enough, death could result. NITROGEN Normally, nitrogen is an inert gas. When heated to approximately 2500°F. through the combustion process, this gas becomes active and causes an increase in the nitric oxide (NOx) emission. Oxides of nitrogen (NOx) are composed of approximately 97-98 percent nitric oxide (NO2). Nitric oxide is a colorless gas but when it is passed into the atmosphere, it combines with oxygen and forms nitrogen dioxide (NO2). The nitrogen dioxide then combines with chemically active hydrocarbons (HC) and when in the presence of sunlight, causes the formation of photo chemical smog. OZONE To further complicate matters, some of the nitrogen dioxide (NO2) is broken apart by the sunlight to form nitric oxide and oxygen. (NO2 + sunlight = NO + O). This single atom of oxygen then combines with diatomic (meaning 2 atoms) oxygen (O2) to form ozone (O3). Ozone is 1 of the smells associated with smog. It has a pungent and offensive odor, irritates the eyes and lung tissues, affects the growth of plant life and causes rapid deterioration of rubber products. Ozone can be formed by sunlight as well as electrical discharge into the air. The most common discharge area on the automobile engine is the secondary ignition electrical system, especially when inferior quality spark plug cables are used. As the surge of high voltage is routed through the secondary cable, the circuit builds up an electrical field around the wire, acting upon the oxygen in the surrounding air to form the ozone. The faint glow along the cable with the engine running that may be visible on a dark night, is called the "corona discharge." It is the result of the electrical field passing from a high along the cable, to a low in the surrounding air, which forms the ozone gas. The combination of corona and ozone has been a major cause of cable deterioration. Recently, different types and better quality insulating materials have lengthened the life of the electrical cables. Although ozone at ground level can be harmful, ozone is beneficial to the earth's inhabitants. By having a concentrated ozone layer called the "ozonosphere, between 10 and 20 miles up in the atmosphere much of the ultra violet radiation from the sun's rays are absorbed and screened. If this ozone layer were not present, much of the earth's surface would be burned, dried and unfit for human life. There is much discussion concerning the ozone layer and its density. A feeling exists that this protective layer of ozone is slowly diminishing and corrective action must be directed to this problem. Much experimenting is presently being conducted to determine if a problem exists and if so, the short and long term effects of the problem and how it can be remedied. OXIDES OF SULFUR Oxides of sulfur (SOx) were initially ignored in the exhaust system emissions, since the sulfur content of gasoline as a fuel is less than 1/10 of 1 percent. Because of this small amount, it was felt that it contributed very little to the overall pollution problem. However, because of the difficulty in solving the sulfur emissions in industrial pollutions and the introduction of catalytic converter to the automobile exhaust systems, a change was mandated. The automobile exhaust system, when equipped with a catalytic converter, changes the sulfur dioxide (SO2) into the sulfur trioxide (SO3). When this combines with water vapors (H2O), a sulfuric acid mist (H2SO4) is formed and is a very difficult pollutant to handle and is extremely corrosive. This sulfuric acid mist that is formed, is the same mist that rises from the vents of an automobile storage battery when an active chemical reaction takes place within the battery cells. When a large concentration of vehicles equipped with catalytic converters are operating in an area, this acid mist will rise and be distributed over a large ground area causing land, plant, crop, paints and building damage. PARTICULATE MATTER A certain amount of particulate matter is present in the burning of any fuel, with carbon constituting the largest percentage of the particulates. In gasoline, the remaining percentage of particulates is the burned remains of the various other compounds used in its manufacture. When a gasoline engine is in good internal condition, the particulate emissions are low but as the engine wears internally, the particulate emissions increase. By visually inspecting the tail pipe emissions, a determination can be made as to where an engine defect may exist. An engine with light gray smoke emitting from the tail pipe normally indicates an increase in the oil consumption through burning due to internal engine wear. Black smoke would indicate a defective fuel delivery system, causing the engine to operate in a rich mode. Regardless of the color of the smoke, the internal part of the engine or the fuel delivery system should be repaired to a "like new" condition to prevent excess particulate emissions. Diesel and turbine engines emit a darkened plume of smoke from the exhaust system because of the type of fuel used. Emission control regulations are mandated for this type of emission and more stringent measures are being used to prevent excess emission of the particulate matter. Electronic components are being introduced to control the injection of the fuel at precisely the proper time of piston travel, to achieve the optimum in fuel ignition and fuel usage. Other particulate after-burning components are being tested to achieve a cleaner particular emission. Good grades of engine lubricating oils should be used, meeting the manufacturers specification. "Cut-rate" oils can contribute to the particulate emission problem because of their low "flash" or ignition temperature point. Such oils burn prematurely during the combustion process causing emissions of particulate matter. The cooling system is an important factor in the reduction of particulate matter. With the cooling system operating at a temperature specified by the manufacturer, the optimum of combustion will occur. The cooling system must be maintained in the same manner as the engine oiling system, as each system is required to perform properly in order for the engine to operate efficiently for a long time. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Other Automobile Emission Sources Before emission controls were mandated on the internal combustion engines, other sources of engine pollutants were discovered, along with the exhaust emission. It was determined the engine combustion exhaust produced 60 percent of the total emission pollutants, fuel evaporation from the fuel tank and carburetor vents produced 20 percent, with the another 20 percent being produced through the crankcase as a by-product of the combustion process. Print CRANKCASE EMISSIONS Crankcase emissions are made up of water, acids, unburned fuel, oil fumes and particulates. The emissions are classified as hydrocarbons (HC) and are formed by the small amount of unburned, compressed air/fuel mixture entering the crankcase from the combustion area during the compression and power strokes, between the cylinder walls and piston rings. The head of the compression and combustion help to form the remaining crankcase emissions. Since the first engines, crankcase emissions were allowed to go into the air through a road draft tube, mounted on the lower side of the engine block. Fresh air came in through an open oil filler cap or breather. The air passed through the crankcase mixing with blow-by gases. The motion of the vehicle and the air blowing past the open end of the road draft tube caused a low pressure area at the end of the tube. Crankcase emissions were simply drawn out of the road draft tube into the air. To control the crankcase emission, the road draft tube was deleted. A hose and/or tubing was routed from the crankcase to the intake manifold so the blow-by emission could be burned with the air/fuel mixture. However, it was found that intake manifold vacuum, used to draw the crankcase emissions into the manifold, would vary in strength at the wrong time and not allow the proper emission flow. A regulating type valve was needed to control the flow of air through the crankcase. Testing, showed the removal of the blow-by gases from the crankcase as quickly as possible, was most important to the longevity of the engine. Should large accumulations of blow-by gases remain and condense, dilution of the engine oil would occur to form water, soots, resins, acids and lead salts, resulting in the formation of sludge and varnishes. This condensation of the blow-by gases occur more frequently on vehicles used in numerous starting and stopping conditions, excessive idling and when the engine is not allowed to attain normal operating temperature through short runs. The crankcase purge control or PCV system will be described in detail later in this section. FUEL EVAPORATIVE EMISSIONS Gasoline fuel is a major source of pollution, before and after it is burned in the automobile engine. From the time the fuel is refined, stored, pumped and transported, again stored until it is pumped into the fuel tank of the vehicle, the gasoline gives off unburned hydrocarbons (HC) into the atmosphere. Through redesigning of the storage areas and venting systems, the pollution factor has been diminished but not eliminated, from the refinery standpoint. However, the automobile still remained the primary source of vaporized, unburned hydrocarbon (HC) emissions. Fuel pumped form an underground storage tank is cool but when exposed to a warner ambient temperature, will expand. Before controls were mandated, an owner would fill the fuel tank with fuel from an underground storage tank and park the vehicle for some time in warm area, such as a parking lot. As the fuel would warm, it would expand and should no provisions or area be provided for the expansion, the fuel would spill out the filler neck and onto the ground, causing hydrocarbon (HC) pollution and creating a severe fire hazard. To correct this condition, the vehicle manufacturers added overflow plumbing and/or gasoline tanks with built in expansion areas or domes. However, this did not control the fuel vapor emission from the fuel tank and the carburetor bowl. It was determined that most of the fuel evaporation occurred when the vehicle was stationary and the engine not operating. Most vehicles carry 5-25 gallons of gasoline. Should a large concentration of vehicles be parked in 1 area, such as a large parking lot, excessive fuel vapor emissions would take place, increasing as the temperature increases. To prevent the vapor emission from escaping into the atmosphere, the fuel system is designed to trap the fuel vapors while the vehicle is stationary, by sealing the fuel system from the atmosphere. A storage system is used to collect and hold the fuel vapors from the carburetor and the fuel tank when the engine is not operating. When the engine is started, the storage system is then purged of the fuel vapors, which are drawn into the engine and burned with the air/fuel mixture. The components of the fuel evaporative system will be described in detail later in this section. Back to Top Fuel System Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Adjustments IDLE SPEED ADJUSTMENT Print Idle is not adjusted at the throttle plate stop screw. That screw is set at the factory and is not adjustable. All idle adjustments are made by turning the idle adjusting screw on the throttle body. All idle tests must be met and the idle must remain stable under all test conditions. 1986-1990 Legend 1. Start engine and warm up to normal operating temperature; the cooling fan must come on at least once. 2. Connect a tachometer. 3. Set the steering wheel in the straight-ahead or no load condition. Make certain all electrical accessories are turned OFF ; check the idle speed. Correct idle speed is 680 plus or minus 50 rpm with the transaxle in P or N . 4. Check the ECU under the front passenger seat. If the yellow LED is not lit, the idle speed is correct and no adjustment is needed. If the yellow LED is blinking, adjust the idle speed adjusting screw 1 / 4 turn clockwise. If the yellow LED is lit constantly-not flashing-turn the idle adjusting screw turn counter-clockwise. 5. Once adjusted, the yellow LED should turn off within 30 seconds. If it does not, turn the idle adjuster another 1 1 / 4 turn, continuing at 30 second intervals until the LED goes out. 6. Check the idle under each of the following conditions individually. Idle speed should remain stable at 680 plus or minus 50 rpm under each condition: High beam headlights and rear window defogger ON ; steering wheel turned sharply; air conditioner compressor engaged; automatic transaxle in a drive gear. 1991-93 Legend See Figures 1 and 2 /4 1. Start engine and warm up to normal operating temperature; the cooling fan must come on at least once. Switch the ignition OFF . 2. Connect a tachometer. 3. Disconnect the 2-pin connector on the EACV. 4. Start the engine with the accelerator pedal slightly depressed. Use the pedal to stabilize the engine speed at 1000 rpm. Slowly release the throttle until the engine idles. Check the idle with air conditioning, cooling fan and all electrical loads OFF . 5. The idle should be 450 plus or minus 50 rpm for manual vehicles and 480 plus or minus 50 rpm for automatic vehicles. 6. If the rpm is not within specifications, adjust as needed by turning the idle adjusting screw on the throttle body. 7. Switch the ignition OFF . Reconnect the connector to the EACV, then clear the ECU by removing the No. 15 fuse in the underdash fuse box for at least 10 seconds. 8. Restart the engine, allowing it to idle in N or P for 1 minute. With all electrical loads including the air conditioning and cooling fan OFF , idle speed should be 650 plus or minus 50 rpm for manual vehicles and 600 plus or minus 50 for automatic vehicles. Fig. Fig. 1: Idle speed adjustment-Integra Fig. Fig. 2: Idle speed adjustment-Legend Integra 1. Apply the parking brake. Start engine and warm up to normal operating temperature; the cooling fan must come on at least once. 2. Connect a tachometer. 3. Disconnect the 2-pin connector on the EACV. 4. Check the idle with the transaxle in N or P and the air conditioning, cooling fan and all electrical loads OFF . 5. The idle should be 650 plus or minus 50 rpm. 6. If the rpm is not within specifications, adjust as needed by turning the idle adjusting screw on the throttle body. If the idle speed is excessively high, check the throttle control system. 7. Switch the ignition OFF . Reconnect the connector to the EACV, then clear the ECU by removing the BACK UP (Canadian: HAZARD, BACK-UP) fuse in the underhood relay box for at least 10 seconds. 8. Restart the engine, allowing it to idle. With all electrical loads including the air conditioning and cooling fan OFF , idle speed should be 750 plus or minus 50 rpm with the transaxle in P or N . 9. Allow the engine to idle for 1 minute with the headlight high beams and rear defogger ON . The idle speed should be 750 plus or minus 50 rpm. 10. Switch the air conditioner ON and the blower fan to HI . After 1 minute, the idle should be 750 plus or minus 50 rpm. 11. If the idle speed is out of specification, refer to the system troubleshooting charts in Driveability & Emissions Controls of this repair guide. Vigor See Figure 3 Fig. Fig. 3: Idle speed adjustment-Vigor 1. Start engine and warm up to normal operating temperature; the cooling fan must come on at least once. Switch the ignition OFF . 2. Connect a tachometer. 3. Disconnect the 2-pin connector on the EACV. 4. Start the engine with the accelerator pedal slightly depressed. Use the pedal to stabilize the engine speed at 1000 rpm. Slowly release the throttle until the engine idles. Check the idle with air conditioning, cooling fan and all electrical loads OFF . 5. The idle should be 550 plus or minus 50 rpm with the vehicle in P or N . 6. If the rpm is not within specifications, adjust as needed by turning the idle adjusting screw on the throttle body. 7. Switch the ignition OFF . Reconnect the connector to the EACV, then clear the ECU by removing the BACK UP fuse in the underhood fuse box for at least 10 seconds. 8. Restart the engine, allowing it to idle in N or P for 1 minute. With all electrical loads including the air conditioning and cooling fan OFF , idle speed should be 700 plus or minus 50 rpm. 9. Allow the engine to idle for 1 minute with the headlight high beams and rear defogger ON . The idle speed should be 770 plus or minus 50 rpm. 10. Turn the headlights and defogger OFF. Switch the air conditioner ON and the blower fan to HI . After 1 minute, the idle should be 770 plus or minus 50 rpm. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Bypass Valve System Diaphragm and Control Solenoids See Figures 1, 2, and 3 Print This system is found on Legend and Vigor vehicles. At a predetermined rpm, the ECU energizes the bypass control solenoid. The solenoid opens electrically, allowing vacuum to flow to the control valve diaphragm(s). As the vacuum acts on the diaphragm, the operating lever is moved and the blades of the valve open. This allows the intake air to follow a shorter path, delivering more power at high rpm. When the rpm drops below the trigger level, the signal from the ECU is discontinued, the solenoid shuts off the vacuum and the system reverts to its previous state. The diaphragm and linkage may be inspected and cleaned with carburetor cleaner if it is not closing fully. The arm should rest on the limit screw with the vacuum hose connected, but the limit screw must not be adjusted; it is set at the factory and should not be changed. Additionally, the diaphragm is part of the bypass valve assembly. If the diaphragm must be replaced, the bypass valve must be removed from the intake manifold. The control solenoids are located in the and 1986-1990 Legend emission control box, at the rear of the Vigor intake manifold or behind and below the right headlight on 1991-93 Legend. The solenoid may be removed in straightforward fashion by disconnecting the wiring connector and then the vacuum hoses. Make absolutely certain that the vacuum hoses are reinstalled to the proper ports on the valve(s). Fig. Fig. 1: Bypass valve control system-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 2: Chamber volume control system-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 3: Bypass valve control system-Vigor Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide EGR System Controls and Purge Control REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print The controls associated with control of the EGR and purge control system are located within the control box on the firewall. These components include the EGR control solenoid valve, the CVC valve and air chamber if used, as well as the purge cut-off solenoid valve. Replacement of any of these items requires removing the control box from its mounts, disconnecting the external electrical connectors and opening the control box. Disconnect the vacuum hose(s) to the component and remove the component. Installation is in the reverse order of removal. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Electric Load Detector This sensor is used on Vigor only and is located in the underhood fuse and relay box. The ELD unit is integral with the fuse box in which it is mounted; should the sensor fail, the fuse/relay box assembly must be replaced. Print Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Electronic Air Control Valve (EACV) Fast Idle Valve Air Boost Valve REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print 1. These air control valves are located at the side of the intake chamber or plenum downstream of the throttle body. On Integra vehicles, the fast idle valve is located in the emission control box. 2. Disconnect the wiring connector at the valve. 3. Label and disconnect the vacuum hoses from the unit. 4. Remove the mounting bolts and remove the valve. Recover and discard the O-rings from the vacuum ports. The fast idle valve is factory adjusted; it should not be disassembled or altered. To install: 5. Replace the O-rings and make certain they are properly seated. 6. Install the valve and the retaining bolts. The pintle or control valve for the EACV must seat correctly in its port. Tighten the bolts to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm). 7. Connect the vacuum hoses to the valve; make certain each hose is connected to the proper port. Connect the electrical connector. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide FUEL INJECTION SYSTEM This section covers the replacement of fuel system components. For diagnosis of the fuel system, refer to Driveability & Emissions Controls of this guide. Print Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Fuel Pressure Regulator REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print See Figures 1 and 2 1. Place a cloth or rag under the regulator. Be prepared to contain escaping fuel. 2. Relieve the fuel system pressure at the fuel filter. 3. Disconnect the vacuum hose from the regulator. 4. Disconnect the fuel line from the regulator; plug the line to prevent spillage or the entry of dirt. 5. Remove the 2 retaining bolts and remove the regulator. Fig. Fig. 1: Removing the fuel pressure regulator-Integra and Legend Fig. Fig. 2: Removing the fuel pressure regulator-Vigor 6. Remove the O-ring from the regulator and discard it. To install: 7. Install a new O-ring on the regulator; coat the ring lightly with a thin coat of clean, fresh oil. 8. Install the regulator, making sure the O-ring is not distorted or damaged. Tighten the retaining bolts to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm). 9. Connect the fuel line. 10. Install the vacuum line. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Fuel Pump The fuel pump on all models except the 1986-90 Integra, is located in the fuel tank. On the 1986-90 Integra the fuel pump is located under the rear of the vehicle, near the drivers side of the fuel tank. Print PRESSURE TESTING See Figure 1 On all models, the fuel pump should run for about 2 seconds when the ignition is first turned ON . By removing the filler cap and listening at the filler, it should be possible to hear the pump run each time the ignition is switched ON . It will then stop again until the starter is activated. Fig. Fig. 1: Checking the fuel system pressure 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable and remove the fuel filler cap. 2. Relieve the fuel system pressure. 3. Remove the service bolt and attach a fuel pressure gauge to the top of the fuel filter. 4. Start the engine and measure the fuel pressure with the engine idling and vacuum hose to the pressure regulator disconnected; 1986-1989 Integra-35-41 psi. (240-279 kPa) 1990-93 Integra-37-44 psi. (255-304 kPa) 1989-90 Legend-36-41 psi. (250-279 kPa) 1991-93 Legend-38-46 psi. (265-314 kPa) Vigor-43-50 psi. (300-350 kPa) 5. Check to see that the pressure decreases when the vacuum hose is connected. 6. If the pressure is higher than specifications, check for a pinched or clogged fuel return hose or faulty pressure regulator. 7. If the pressure is lower than specifications, check for a clogged filter, defective pressure regulator or leakage in the fuel line. 8. After inspection, remove the pressure gauge and install the service bolt with a new washer. REMOVAL & INSTALLATION 1986-1989 Integra 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. 2. Relieve the fuel system pressure. 3. Raise and safely support the vehicle and remove the left rear wheel. 4. Remove the fuel pump cover bolts and the cover. 5. Remove the fuel pump mount bolts and the fuel pump with it's mount. 6. Disconnect the fuel hoses and the electrical connectors. 7. Installation is the reverse of removal. Use new sealing washers when connecting the fuel hoses. After the pump is installed, turn the ignition switch ON and OFF a number of times to pressurize the system and check for leaks. 1990-93 Integra and Vigor See Figures 2 and 3 1. On Integra, remove the rear seat and access panel and disconnect the wiring. 2. Remove the fuel tank. 3. Remove the pump flange mounting nuts and lift the pump out. 4. Installation is the reverse of removal. Use new sealing washers when connecting the fuel hoses. After the pump is installed, turn the ignition switch ON and OFF a number of times to pressurize the system and check for leaks. Fig. Fig. 2: Removing the fuel pump access cover-Legend and Vigor Fig. Fig. 3: Removing the fuel pump assembly-Legend and Vigor Legend 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. 2. Relieve the fuel system pressure. 3. Remove the maintenance access cover in the luggage area. 4. Disconnect the fuel lines and the electrical connectors. 5. Remove the fuel pump from the fuel tank. 6. Installation is the reverse of removal. Use new sealing washers when connecting the fuel hoses. After the pump is installed, turn the ignition switch ON and OFF a number of times to pressurize the system and check for leaks. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Fuel Rail and Injectors REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print See Figures 1 through 5 1. Relieve the fuel pressure. 2. On Vigor and 1991-93 Legend remove the engine harness cover. 3. Label and disconnect the electrical harnesses from the injectors. 4. Place a rag below the fuel pressure regulator. Disconnect the vacuum hose and disconnect the fuel line. Plug the fuel line to prevent spillage and the entry of dirt. 5. Disconnect the fuel hose from the fuel rail. 6. Remove the nuts holding the fuel pipe (rail) and the wiring harness. 7. Remove the fuel rail from the injectors, leaving the injectors in the manifold. 8. Remove each injector and remove the seal ring from each manifold port. Fig. Fig. 1: Cutaway and installed views of the fuel injector Fig. Fig. 2: Fuel rail and injectors-Integra Fig. Fig. 3: Always align the injector mark with the mark on the fuel rail Fig. Fig. 4: Fuel rail and injectors-Legend Fig. Fig. 5: Fuel rail and injectors-Vigor 9. Remove the cushion ring and O-ring from each injector. To install: 10. Install new cushion rings on each injector. Install new O-rings on each injector and coat the O-rings with a light coat of clean, thin oil. 11. Install the injectors into the fuel pipe. Make certain the O-rings seat properly and do not distort. 12. Coat new seal rings with a light coat of clean, thin oil and install the rings into the manifold. 13. Install the fuel rail and injectors to the intake manifold. Make certain the mounting insulators are present on the mounting bolts before installing the fuel rail. Assembling each injector into the rail off the engine prevents damage to the O-rings. Handle the rail and injector assembly carefully when reinstalling to the manifold. Don't drop an injector or bang the tips. 14. With all injectors seated in the manifold, align the center mark on each injector electrical connector with the mark on the fuel rail. 15. Install the fuel rail retaining nuts and tighten them evenly to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm). Make certain the wiring harness is retained in its clips. 16. Connect the vacuum hose and fuel hose to the regulator. 17. Connect the fuel line to the fuel rail. 18. Install the connectors to the injectors. 19. Switch the ignition ON but do not engage the starter. The fuel pump should run for approximately 2 seconds, building pressure within the lines. Switch the ignition OFF , then ON 2 or 3 more times to build full system pressure. Check the work area for fuel leaks. 20. Install the engine harness covers or intake manifold covers if they were removed. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Igniter REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print Integra See Figure 1 Fig. Fig. 1: Igniter unit mounting-Integra 1. Remove the distributor from the engine. 2. Remove the cap, rotor and seal. 3. Remove the protective cover under the cap 4. Remove the protective cover from the ignition coil and remove the coil. 5. Remove the retaining screws and remove the igniter from the distributor housing. To install: 6. Install the igniter and tighten the retaining screws. 7. Install the coil and coil cover. 8. Reassemble the leak cover, rotor, seal and distributor cap. 9. Install the distributor. Except Integra The igniter is mounted externally in the engine compartment. For 1986-1990 Legend, it is on the left shock tower; on 1991-93 Legends, it is on the right front shock tower, just behind the underhood fuse/relay box. For 5 cylinder Vigor engines, the igniter is on the right fender apron, near the firewall. To remove these igniters, turn the ignition switch OFF , disconnect the connector and remove the retaining bolts. Reinstall in reverse order. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Injector Resistor REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print See Figures 1, 2, 3 and 4 Fig. Fig. 1: Injector resistor mounting and testing-Integra Fig. Fig. 2: Injector resistor mounting and testing-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 3: Injector resistor mounting and testing-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 4: Injector resistor mounting and testing-Vigor 1. Switch the ignition OFF . 2. The resistor is located in the engine compartment. On 1986-1990 Legend, it is on the right side firewall; on Vigor and 1991-93 Legends, it is on the left shock tower. On Integra, look for it on the left firewall near the fender. Disconnect the wiring connector to the resistor. 3. Remove or disconnect any wiring harness clamps or retainers holding the resistor harness. 4. Remove the retaining bolts holding the resistor; remove the resistor. 5. Reassemble in reverse order. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Intake Air Temperature (TA) Sensor REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print The sensor is located on the intake manifold or air plenum. It is removed and installed in straightforward fashion; disconnect the wiring connector and remove the mounting screws. Remove the sensor. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide MAP Sensor REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print The MAP sensor is located within the emission control box on the firewall for all vehicles except the Integra and Vigor. The Integra sensor is located on the firewall next to 2 solenoid valves; the Vigor sensor is located on the left fender apron. If necessary, remove the control box from its mounts and open the box. Disconnect the wire harness connector to the sensor, then disconnect the vacuum hose(s). Remove the sensor from its mount. When reassembling, handle the unit carefully. Install it securely in the mounting and attach the vacuum line(s) and wiring connector. Reassemble and install the emissions box. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Oxygen Sensor REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print 1. Allow the exhaust system to cool before beginning the work; the pipe and sensor skin temperature may exceed 300 degrees when the engine has been operating. 2. Disconnect the wiring connector for the sensor(s). Free the wire from any retaining clips. 3. Using an oxygen sensor socket, unscrew the sensor. This tool prevents damage to the sensor or wiring harness. 4. If the sensor is to be reused, protect the tip from exposure to chemicals, oil, gasoline, etc. To install: 5. Coat the threads of the sensor with an anti-seize compound. Take great care not to get any compound or other petroleum product on the tip of the sensor. Install the sensor to the manifold or exhaust pipe. 6. Tighten the sensor to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm). 7. Install the wiring into the clips and connect the wiring connector. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Relieving Fuel System Pressure Print CAUTION The fuel system is under constant pressure, even when the engine has not been run for a period of time. To avoid injury and/or property damage, always safely relieve the fuel system pressure before servicing any fuel or return line component. 1. Remove the fuel filler cap. 2. With the ignition OFF , disconnect the negative battery cable. 3. Locate the 6mm service bolt; it is located at the fuel inlet line to the fuel filter. 4. Use a wrench to hold the larger bolt below the service bolt. Use a box-end wrench on the service bolt. Place a rag or cloth over the wrenches and service bolt. 5. Slowly loosen the service bolt 1 full turn. The pressurized fuel will escape into the rag. 6. Remove the service bolt, replace the washer and reinstall the bolt. Tighten the bolt to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm). The washer must be replaced any time the service bolt is loosened or removed. Failure to replace the washer may result in high-pressure fuel leaks. 7. Dispose of the fuel-soaked rag in a manner correct for flammable items. Check the surrounding area for any spilled fuel. 8. The pressure within the system will stay reduced until the ignition switch is turned ON or the fuel pump is operated by other means. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Service Precautions Print Disconnect the negative battery terminal. Whenever possible, use a flashlight instead of a drop light. Keep all open flame and smoking material out of the area. Use a shop cloth or similar to catch fuel when opening a fuel system. Always relieve fuel system pressure before loosening any line or component. Always use eye or full-face protection. Always keep a dry chemical (class B-C) fire extinguisher near the work area. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide TDC/Crank Angle/Cylinder Sensors REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print Legend See Figure 1 Fig. Fig. 1: TDC/CRANK/CYL Sensor locations-Legend 1. Set the engine to TDC No. 1 cylinder. On 1986-1990 vehicles, remove the cruise control actuator. Disconnect the CRANK/CYL sensor connector. 2. Remove the upper timing belt cover from the front bank of cylinders on 1986-1990 vehicles. On later models, remove both upper belt covers. 3. Remove the timing belt from the upper pulley(s). 4. Remove the 3 bolts holding the front or left pulley and remove it. 5. Remove the front upper cover back plate. 6. Unbolt and remove the sensor. To install: 7. Carefully install the sensor on the head and tighten the bolts to 9 ft. lbs (12 Nm). 8. Install the upper cover back plate and gaskets. 9. Align the cam pulley pin with the camshaft hole to install the cam pulley. Tighten the bolts to 23 ft. lbs (32 Nm). 10. Install the timing belt. 11. Install the upper timing belt cover. 12. Install the cruise control actuator if it was removed. Integra The sensors are contained within the distributor housing and are not individually serviceable. Should any of the sensors become faulty, the distributor housing must be replaced. All of the components external to the housing, such as the cap, rotor, coil and igniter may be transferred to the new unit. Vigor See Figure 2 Fig. Fig. 2: TDC/CRANK/CYL Sensor locations-Vigor 1. Set the engine to TDC No. 1 cylinder. Disconnect the TDC/CRANK/CYL sensor connector. 2. Remove the upper timing belt cover from the belt. 3. Remove the timing belt from the upper pulley. 4. Remove the bolt holding the pulley and remove it. 5. Remove the timing belt back plate. 6. Unbolt and remove the sensor(s). The TDC/CRANK sensor is held by two bolts; the CYL sensor is held by a nut and a bolt To install: 7. Carefully install the sensors on the head and tighten the bolts and nut to 9 ft. lbs (12 Nm). 8. Install the back plate. 9. Align the cam pulley key with the camshaft slot to install the cam pulley. Tighten the pulley bolt to 54 ft. lbs (75 Nm). 10. Install the timing belt. 11. Install the upper timing belt cover. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Throttle Angle Sensor REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print The throttle angle sensor is located on the side of the throttle body and connected to the throttle axle or pivot. Once the throttle body is removed, the sensor may be removed by removing the retaining bolts. When reinstalling, make certain the sensor is correctly mated with the throttle body shaft. Install the bolts. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Throttle Body REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print See Figures 1, 2 and 3 1. Disconnect the air intake tube from the throttle body. 2. Drain the cooling system, at least to a level below the throttle body. 3. Disconnect the coolant hoses running to the throttle body. 4. Label and disconnect the vacuum hoses from the throttle body. 5. Disconnect the wiring connector(s) from the throttle body. 6. Label and disconnect the throttle control, cruise control and/or accelerator cable. Do not kink the cables. 7. Remove the nuts holding the throttle body to the intake chamber or plenum. Loosen each nut 1-2 turns at a time to release the pressure evenly. Fig. Fig. 1: Throttle body assembly-Integra Fig. Fig. 2: Throttle body assembly-Legend Fig. Fig. 3: Throttle body assembly-Vigor 8. Remove the throttle body assembly. Remove and discard the gasket. Some models use a solid insulator below the throttle body instead of a regular gasket. This base may be removed after its retaining bolts are removed. If the insulator is in good condition and free of any cracks or distortion, it may be reused. To install: 9. Install a new gasket or insulator on the plenum. If an insulator is in use, tighten its retaining bolts to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). Install the throttle body onto the studs. The gasket or insulator is correctly installed in only one position; make sure the grooves and passages in the gasket align with the matching openings on the air chamber. 10. Install the retaining nuts. Tighten them evenly and alternately to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). 11. Install the cruise control, throttle control and/or accelerator cables. 12. Connect the vacuum hoses. 13. Connect the coolant hoses. 14. Refill the cooling system. 15. Connect the air intake ducts. Back to Top Chassis Electrical Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Mechanical Test Equipment VACUUM GAUGE Print Most gauges are graduated in inches of mercury (in.Hg), although a device called a manometer reads vacuum in inches of water (in. H2O). The normal vacuum reading usually varies between 18 and 22 in.Hg at sea level. To test engine vacuum, the vacuum gauge must be connected to a source of manifold vacuum. Many engines have a plug in the intake manifold which can be removed and replaced with an adapter fitting. Connect the vacuum gauge to the fitting with a suitable rubber hose or, if no manifold plug is available, connect the vacuum gauge to any device using manifold vacuum, such as EGR valves, etc. The vacuum gauge can be used to determine if enough vacuum is reaching a component to allow its actuation. HAND VACUUM PUMP Small, hand-held vacuum pumps come in a variety of designs. Most have a built-in vacuum gauge and allow the component to be tested without removing it from the vehicle. Operate the pump lever or plunger to apply the correct amount of vacuum required for the test specified in the diagnosis routines. The level of vacuum in inches of Mercury (in.Hg) is indicated on the pump gauge. For some testing, an additional vacuum gauge may be necessary. Intake manifold vacuum is used to operate various systems and devices on late model vehicles. To correctly diagnose and solve problems in vacuum control systems, a vacuum source is necessary for testing. In some cases, vacuum can be taken from the intake manifold when the engine is running, but vacuum is normally provided by a hand vacuum pump. These hand vacuum pumps have a built-in vacuum gauge that allow testing while the device is still attached to the component. For some tests, an additional vacuum gauge may be necessary. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Safety Precautions Print CAUTION Whenever working on or around any computer based microprocessor control system, always observe these general precautions to prevent the possibility of personal injury or damage to electronic components. Never install or remove battery cables with the key ON or the engine running. Jumper cables should be connected with the key OFF to avoid power surges that can damage electronic control units. Engines equipped with computer controlled systems should avoid both giving and getting jump starts due to the possibility of serious damage to components from voltage spikes when connections are made with the ignition ON. Always remove the battery cables before charging the battery. Never use a high output charger on an installed battery or attempt to use any type of "hot shot" (24 volt) starting aid. Exercise care when inserting test probes into connectors to insure good connections without damaging the connector or spreading the pins. Always probe connectors from the rear (wire) side, NOT the pin side, to avoid accidental shorting of terminals during test procedures. Never remove or attach wiring harness connectors with the ignition switch ON, especially to an electronic control unit. Do not drop any components during service procedures and never apply 12 volts directly to any component (like a solenoid or relay) unless instructed specifically to do so. Some component electrical windings are designed to safely handle only 4 or 5 volts and can be destroyed in seconds if 12 volts are applied directly to the connector. Remove the electronic control unit if the vehicle is to be placed in an environment where temperatures exceed approximately 176°F (80°C), such as a paint spray booth or when arc or gas welding near the control unit location in the car. ORGANIZED TROUBLESHOOTING When diagnosing a specific problem, organized troubleshooting is a must. The complexity of a modern automobile demands that you approach any problem in a logical, organized manner. There are certain troubleshooting techniques that are standard: 1. Establish when the problem occurs. Does the problem appear only under certain conditions- Were there any noises, odors, or other unusual symptoms2. Isolate the problem area. To do this, make some simple tests and observations; then eliminate the systems that are working properly. Check for obvious problems such as broken wires, dirty connections or split or disconnected vacuum hoses. Always check the obvious before assuming something complicated is the cause. 3. Test for problems systematically to determine the cause once the problem area is isolated. Are all the components functioning properly- Is there power going to electrical switches and motors- Is there vacuum at vacuum switches and/or actuators- Is there a mechanical problem such as bent linkage or loose mounting screws- Doing careful, systematic checks will often turn up most causes on the first inspection without wasting time checking components that have little or no relationship to the problem. 4. Test all repairs after the work is done to make sure that the problem is fixed. Some causes can be traced to more than one component, so a careful verification of repair work is important to pick up additional malfunctions that may cause a problem to reappear or a different problem to arise. A blown fuse, for example, is a simple problem that may require more than another fuse to repair. If you don't look for a problem that caused a fuse to blow, for example, a shorted wire may go undetected. Experience has shown that most problems tend to be the result of a fairly simple and obvious cause, such as loose or corroded connectors or air leaks in the intake system; making careful inspection of components during testing essential to quick and accurate troubleshooting. Special, hand held computerized testers designed specifically for diagnosing the system are available from a variety of aftermarket sources, as well as from the vehicle manufacturer, but care should be taken that any test equipment being used is designed to diagnose that particular computer controlled system accurately without damaging the control unit (ECU) or components being tested. Pinpointing the exact cause of trouble in an electrical system can sometimes only be accomplished by the use of special test equipment. The following describes commonly used test equipment and explains how to put it to best use in diagnosis. In addition to the information covered below, the manufacturer's instructions booklet provided with the tester should be read and clearly understood before attempting any test procedures. TEST EQUIPMENT Jumper Wires Jumper wires are simple, yet extremely valuable, pieces of test equipment. Jumper wires are merely wires that are used to bypass sections of a circuit. The simplest type of jumper wire is merely a length of multi-strand wire with an alligator clip at each end. Jumper wires are usually fabricated from lengths of standard automotive wire and whatever type of connector (alligator clip, spade connector or pin connector) that is required for the particular vehicle being tested. The well equipped tool box will have several different styles of jumper wires in several different lengths. Some jumper wires are made with three or more terminals coming from a common splice for special purpose testing. In cramped, hard-to-reach areas it is advisable to have insulated boots over the jumper wire terminals in order to prevent accidental grounding, sparks, and possible fire, especially when testing fuel system components. Jumper wires are used primarily to locate open electrical circuits, on either the ground (-) side of the circuit or on the hot (+) side. If an electrical component fails to operate, connect the jumper wire between the component and a good ground. If the component operates only with the jumper installed, the ground circuit is open. If the ground circuit is good, but the component does not operate, the circuit between the power feed and component is open. You can sometimes connect the jumper wire directly from the battery to the hot terminal of the component, but first make sure the component uses 12 volts in operation. Some electrical components, such as fuel injectors, are designed to operate on about 4 volts and running 12 volts directly to the injector terminals can burn out the wiring. By inserting an in-line fuse holder between a set of test leads, a fused jumper wire can be used for bypassing open circuits. Use a 5 amp fuse to provide protection against voltage spikes. When in doubt, use a voltmeter to check the voltage input to the component and measure how much voltage is being applied normally. By moving the jumper wire successively back from the lamp toward the power source, you can isolate the area of the circuit where the open is located. When the component stops functioning, or the power is cut off, the open is in the segment of wire between the jumper and the point previously tested. CAUTION Never use jumpers made from wire that is of lighter gauge than used in the circuit under test. If the jumper wire is of too small gauge, it may overheat and possibly melt. Never use jumpers to bypass high resistance loads (such as motors) in a circuit. Bypassing resistances, in effect, creates a short circuit which may, in turn, cause damage and fire. Never use a jumper for anything other than temporary bypassing of components in a circuit. 12 Volt Test Light The 12 volt test light is used to check circuits and components while electrical current is flowing through them. It is used for voltage and ground tests. Twelve volt test lights come in different styles but all have three main parts; a ground clip, a probe, and a light. The most commonly used 12 volt test lights have pick-type probes. To use a 12 volt test light, connect the ground clip to a good ground and probe wherever necessary with the pick. The pick should be sharp so that it can penetrate wire insulation to make contact with the wire, without making a large hole in the insulation. The wrap-around light is handy in hard to reach areas or where it is difficult to support a wire to push a probe pick into it. To use the wrap around light, hook the wire to probed with the hook and pull the trigger. A small pick will be forced through the wire insulation into the wire core. CAUTION Do not use a test light to probe electronic ignition spark plug or coil wires. Never use a pick-type test light to probe wiring on computer controlled systems unless specifically instructed to do so. Any wire insulation that is pierced by the test light probe should be taped and sealed with silicone after testing. Like the jumper wire, the 12 volt test light is used to isolate opens in circuits. But, whereas the jumper wire is used to bypass the open to operate the load, the 12 volt test light is used to locate the presence of voltage in a circuit. If the test light glows, you know that there is power up to that point; if the 12 volt test light does not glow when its probe is inserted into the wire or connector, you know that there is an open circuit (no power). Move the test light in successive steps back toward the power source until the light in the handle does glow. When it does glow, the open is between the probe and point previously probed. The test light does not detect that 12 volts (or any particular amount of voltage) is present; it only detects that some voltage is present. It is advisable before using the test light to touch its terminals across the battery posts to make sure the light is operating properly. Self-Powered Test Light The self-powered test light usually contains a 1.5 volt penlight battery. One type of self-powered test light is similar in design to the 12 volt test light. This type has both the battery and the light in the handle and pick-type probe tip. The second type has the light toward the open tip, so that the light illuminates the contact point. The self-powered test light is dual purpose piece of test equipment. It can be used to test for either open or short circuits when power is isolated from the circuit (continuity test). A powered test light should not be used on any computer controlled system or component unless specifically instructed to do so. Many engine sensors can be destroyed by even this small amount of voltage applied directly to the terminals. Open Circuit Testing To use the self-powered test light to check for open circuits, first isolate the circuit from the vehicle's 12 volt power source by disconnecting the battery or wiring harness connector. Connect the test light ground clip to a good ground and probe sections of the circuit sequentially with the test light. (start from either end of the circuit). If the light is out, the open is between the probe and the circuit ground. If the light is on, the open is between the probe and end of the circuit toward the power source. Short Circuit Testing By isolating the circuit both from power and from ground, and using a self-powered test light, you can check for shorts to ground in the circuit. Isolate the circuit from power and ground. Connect the test light ground clip to a good ground and probe any easy-to-reach test point in the circuit. If the light comes on, there is a short somewhere in the circuit. To isolate the short, probe a test point at either end of the isolated circuit (the light should be on). Leave the test light probe connected and open connectors, switches, remove parts, etc., sequentially, until the light goes out. When the light goes out, the short is between the last circuit component opened and the previous circuit opened. The 1.5 volt battery in the test light does not provide much current. A weak battery may not provide enough power to illuminate the test light even when a complete circuit is made (especially if there are high resistances in the circuit). Always make sure that the test battery is strong. To check the battery, briefly touch the ground clip to the probe; if the light glows brightly the battery is strong enough for testing. Never use a self-powered test light to perform checks for opens or shorts when power is applied to the electrical system under test. The 12 volt vehicle power will quickly burn out the 1.5 volt light bulb in the test light. Voltmeter A voltmeter is used to measure voltage at any point in a circuit, or to measure the voltage drop across any part of a circuit. It can also be used to check continuity in a wire or circuit by indicating current flow from one end to the other. Voltmeters usually have various scales on the meter dial and a selector switch to allow the selection of different voltages. The voltmeter has a positive and a negative lead. To avoid damage to the meter, always connect the negative lead to the negative (-) side of circuit (to ground or nearest the ground side of the circuit) and connect the positive lead to the positive (+) side of the circuit (to the power source or the nearest power source). Note that the negative voltmeter lead will always be black and that the positive voltmeter will always be some color other than black (usually red). Depending on how the voltmeter is connected into the circuit, it has several uses. A voltmeter can be connected either in parallel or in series with a circuit and it has a very high resistance to current flow. When connected in parallel, only a small amount of current will flow through the voltmeter current path; the rest will flow through the normal circuit current path and the circuit will work normally. When the voltmeter is connected in series with a circuit, only a small amount of current can flow through the circuit. The circuit will not work properly, but the voltmeter reading will show if the circuit is complete or not. Available Voltage Measurement Set the voltmeter selector switch to the 20V position and connect the meter negative lead to the negative post of the battery. Connect the positive meter lead to the positive post of the battery and turn the ignition switch ON to provide a load. Read the voltage on the meter or digital display. A well charged battery should register over 12 volts. If the meter reads below 11.5 volts, the battery power may be insufficient to operate the electrical system properly. This test determines voltage available from the battery and should be the first step in any electrical trouble diagnosis procedure. Many electrical problems, especially on computer controlled systems, can be caused by a low state of charge in the battery. Excessive corrosion at the battery cable terminals can cause a poor contact that will prevent proper charging and full battery current flow. Normal battery voltage is 12 volts when fully charged. When the battery is supplying current to one or more circuits it is said to be "under load". When everything is off the electrical system is under a "no-load" condition. A fully charged battery may show about 12.5 volts at no load; will drop to 12 volts under medium load; and will drop even lower under heavy load. If the battery is partially discharged the voltage decrease under heavy load may be excessive, even though the battery shows 12 volts or more at no load. When allowed to discharge further, the battery's available voltage under load will decrease more severely. For this reason, it is important that the battery be fully charged during all testing procedures to avoid errors in diagnosis and incorrect test results. Voltage Drop When current flows through a resistance, the voltage beyond the resistance is reduced (the larger the current, the greater the reduction in voltage). When no current is flowing, there is no voltage drop because there is no current flow. All points in the circuit which are connected to the power source are at the same voltage as the power source. The total voltage drop always equals the total source voltage. In a long circuit with many connectors, a series of small, unwanted voltage drops due to corrosion at the connectors can add up to a total loss of voltage which impairs the operation of the normal loads in the circuit. INDIRECT COMPUTATION OF VOLTAGE DROPS 1. Set the voltmeter selector switch to the 20 volt position. 2. Connect the meter negative lead to a good ground. 3. Probe all resistances in the circuit with the positive meter lead. 4. Operate the circuit in all modes and observe the voltage readings. DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF VOLTAGE DROPS 1. Set the voltmeter switch to the 20 volt position. 2. Connect the voltmeter negative lead to the ground side of the resistance load to be measured. 3. Connect the positive lead to the positive side of the resistance or load to be measured. 4. Read the voltage drop directly on the 20 volt scale. Too high a voltage indicates too high a resistance. If, for example, a blower motor runs too slowly, you can determine if there is too high a resistance in the resistor pack. By taking voltage drop readings in all parts of the circuit, you can isolate the problem. Too low a voltage drop indicates too low a resistance. If, for example, a blower motor runs too fast in the MED and/or LOW position, the problem can be isolated in the resistor pack by taking voltage drop readings in all parts of the circuit to locate a possibly shorted resistor. The maximum allowable voltage drop under load is critical, especially if there is more than one high resistance problem in a circuit because all voltage drops are cumulative. A small drop is normal due to the resistance of the conductors. HIGH RESISTANCE TESTING 1. Set the voltmeter selector switch to the 4 volt position. 2. Connect the voltmeter positive lead to the positive post of the battery. 3. Turn on the headlights and heater blower to provide a load. 4. Probe various points in the circuit with the negative voltmeter lead. 5. Read the voltage drop on the 5 volt scale. Some average maximum allowable voltage drops are: FUSE PANEL - .7 volts IGNITION SWITCH - .5 volts HEADLIGHT SWITCH - .7 volts IGNITION COIL (+) - .5 volts ANY OTHER LOAD - 1.3 volts Voltage drops are all measured while a load is operating; without current flow, there will be no voltage drop. Ohmmeter The ohmmeter is designed to read resistance (ohms) in a circuit or component. Although there are several different styles of ohmmeters, all will usually have a selector switch which permits the measurement of different ranges of resistance (usually the selector switch allows the multiplication of the meter reading by 10, 100, 1000, and 10,000). A calibration knob allows the meter to be set at zero for accurate measurement. Since all ohmmeters are powered by an internal battery (usually 9 volts), the ohmmeter can be used as a self-powered test light. When the ohmmeter is connected, current from the ohmmeter flows through the circuit or component being tested. Since the ohmmeter's internal resistance and voltage are known values, the amount of current flow through the meter depends on the resistance of the circuit or component being tested. The ohmmeter can be used to perform continuity test for opens or shorts (either by observation of the meter needle or as a self-powered test light), and to read actual resistance in a circuit. It should be noted that the ohmmeter is used to check the resistance of a component or wire while there is no voltage applied to the circuit. Current flow from an outside voltage source (such as the vehicle battery) can damage the ohmmeter, so the circuit or component should be isolated from the vehicle electrical system before any testing is done. Since the ohmmeter uses its own voltage source, either lead can be connected to any test point. When checking diodes or other solid state components, the ohmmeter leads can only be connected one way in order to measure current flow in a single direction. Make sure the positive (+) and negative (-) terminal connections are as described in the test procedures to verify the one-way diode operation. In using the meter for making continuity checks, do not be concerned with the actual resistance readings. Zero resistance, or any resistance readings, indicate continuity in the circuit. Infinite resistance indicates an open in the circuit. A high resistance reading where there should be none indicates a problem in the circuit. Checks for short circuits are made in the same manner as checks for open circuits except that the circuit must be isolated from both power and normal ground. Infinite resistance indicates no continuity to ground, while zero resistance indicates a dead short to ground. RESISTANCE MEASUREMENT The batteries in an ohmmeter will weaken with age and temperature, so the ohmmeter must be calibrated or "zeroed" before taking measurements. To zero the meter, place the selector switch in its lowest range and touch the two ohmmeter leads together. Turn the calibration knob until the meter needle is exactly on zero. All analog (needle) type ohmmeters must be zeroed before use, but some digital ohmmeter models are automatically calibrated when the switch is turned on. Self-calibrating digital ohmmeters do not have an adjusting knob, but its a good idea to check for a zero readout before use by touching the leads together. All computer controlled systems require the use of a digital ohmmeter with at least 10 megohms impedance for testing. Before any test procedures are attempted, make sure the ohmmeter used is compatible with the electrical system or damage to the on-board computer could result. To measure resistance, first isolate the circuit from the vehicle power source by disconnecting the battery cables or the harness connector. Make sure the key is OFF when disconnecting any components or the battery. Where necessary, also isolate at least one side of the circuit to be checked to avoid reading parallel resistances. Parallel circuit resistances will always give a lower reading than the actual resistance of either of the branches. When measuring the resistance of parallel circuits, the total resistance will always be lower than the smallest resistance in the circuit. Connect the meter leads to both sides of the circuit (wire or component) and read the actual measured ohms on the meter scale. Make sure the selector switch is set to the proper ohm scale for the circuit being tested to avoid misreading the ohmmeter test value. CAUTION Never use an ohmmeter with power applied to the circuit. Like the self-powered test light, the ohmmeter is designed to operate on its own power supply. The normal 12 volt automotive electrical system current could damage the meter. Ammeters An ammeter measures the amount of current flowing through a circuit in units called amperes or amps. Amperes are units of electron flow which indicate how fast the electrons are flowing through the circuit. Since Ohms Law dictates that current flow in a circuit is equal to the circuit voltage divided by the total circuit resistance, increasing voltage also increases the current level (amps). Likewise, any decrease in resistance will increase the amount of amps in a circuit. At normal operating voltage, most circuits have a characteristic amount of amperes, called "current draw" which can be measured using an ammeter. By referring to a specified current draw rating, measuring the amperes, and comparing the two values, one can determine what is happening within the circuit to aid in diagnosis. An open circuit, for example, will not allow any current to flow so the ammeter reading will be zero. More current flows through a heavily loaded circuit or when the charging system is operating. An ammeter is always connected in series with the circuit being tested. All of the current that normally flows through the circuit must also flow through the ammeter; if there is any other path for the current to follow, the ammeter reading will not be accurate. The ammeter itself has very little resistance to current flow and therefore will not affect the circuit, but it will measure current draw only when the circuit is closed and electricity is flowing. Excessive current draw can blow fuses and drain the battery, while a reduced current draw can cause motors to run slowly, lights to dim and other components to not operate properly. The ammeter can help diagnose these conditions by locating the cause of the high or low reading. Multimeters Different combinations of test meters can be built into a single unit designed for specific tests. Some of the more common combination test devices are known as Volt/Amp testers, Tach/Dwell meters, or Digital Multimeters. The Volt/Amp tester is used for charging system, starting system or battery tests and consists of a voltmeter, an ammeter and a variable resistance carbon pile. The voltmeter will usually have at least two ranges for use with 6, 12 and 24 volt systems. The ammeter also has more than one range for testing various levels of battery loads and starter current draw and the carbon pile can be adjusted to offer different amounts of resistance. The Volt/Amp tester has heavy leads to carry large amounts of current and many later models have an inductive ammeter pickup that clamps around the wire to simplify test connections. On some models, the ammeter also has a zero-center scale to allow testing of charging and starting systems without switching leads or polarity. A digital multimeter is a voltmeter, ammeter and ohmmeter combined in an instrument which gives a digital readout. These are often used when testing solid state circuits because of their high input impedance (usually 10 megohms or more). The tach/dwell meter combines a tachometer and a dwell (cam angle) meter and is a specialized kind of voltmeter. The tachometer scale is marked to show engine speed in rpm and the dwell scale is marked to show degrees of distributor shaft rotation. In most electronic ignition systems, dwell is determined by the control unit, but the dwell meter can also be used to check the duty cycle (operation) of some electronic engine control systems. Some tach/dwell meters are powered by an internal battery, while others take their power from the car battery in use. The battery powered testers usually require calibration much like an ohmmeter before testing. Special Test Equipment A variety of diagnostic tools are available to help troubleshoot and repair computerized engine control systems. The most sophisticated of these devices are the console type engine analyzers that usually occupy a garage service bay, but there are several types of aftermarket electronic testers available that will allow quick circuit tests of the engine control system by plugging directly into a special connector located in the engine compartment or under the dashboard. Several tool and equipment manufacturers offer simple, hand held testers that measure various circuit voltage levels on command to check all system components for proper operation. Although these testers usually cost about 300-500, consider that the average computer control unit (or ECM) can cost just as much and the money saved by not replacing perfectly good sensors or components in an attempt to correct a problem could justify the purchase price of a special diagnostic tester the first time it's used. These computerized testers can allow quick and easy test measurements while the engine is operating or while the car is being driven. In addition, the on-board computer memory can be read to access any stored trouble codes; in effect allowing the computer to tell you where it hurts and aid trouble diagnosis by pinpointing exactly which circuit or component is malfunctioning. In the same manner, repairs can be tested to make sure the problem has been corrected. The biggest advantage these special testers have is their relatively easy hookups that minimize or eliminate the chances of making the wrong connections and getting false voltage readings or damaging the computer accidentally. It should be remembered that these testers check voltage levels in circuits; they don't detect mechanical problems or failed components if the circuit voltage falls within the preprogrammed limits stored in the tester PROM unit. Also, most of the hand held testers are designed to work only on one or two systems made by a specific manufacturer. A variety of aftermarket testers are available to help diagnose different computerized control systems. Owatonna Tool Company (OTC), for example, markets a device called the OTC Monitor which plugs directly into the diagnostic link. The OTC tester makes diagnosis a simple matter of pressing the correct buttons and, by changing the internal PROM or inserting a different diagnosis cartridge, it will work on any model from full size to subcompact, over a wide range of years. An adapter is supplied with the tester to allow connection to all types of diagnostic links, regardless of the number of pin terminals used. By inserting an updated PROM into the OTC tester, it can be easily updated to diagnose any new modifications of computerized control systems. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide UNDERSTANDING AND TROUBLESHOOTING ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS Both import and domestic manufacturers are incorporating electronic control systems into their production lines. Most vehicles are equipped with one or more on-board computer, like the unit installed on your car. These electronic components (with no moving parts) should theoretically last the life of the vehicle, provided nothing external happens to damage the circuits or processor chip. Print While it is true that electronic components should never wear out, in the real world malfunctions do occur. It is also true that any computer-based system is extremely sensitive to electrical voltages and cannot tolerate careless or haphazard testing or service procedures. An inexperienced individual can do major damage looking for a minor problem by using the wrong kind of test equipment, connecting test leads or connectors with the ignition switch ON. When selecting test equipment, make sure the manufacturers instructions state that the tester is compatible with whatever type of electronic control system is being serviced. Read all instructions carefully and double check all test points before installing probes or making any test connections. The following section outlines basic diagnosis techniques for dealing with computerized automotive control systems. Along with a general explanation of the various types of test equipment available to aid in servicing modern electronic automotive systems, basic repair techniques for wiring harnesses and connectors is given. Read the basic information before attempting any repairs or testing on any computerized system, to provide the background of information necessary to avoid the most common and obvious mistakes that can cost both time and money. Although the replacement and testing procedures are simple in themselves, the systems are not, and unless one has a thorough understanding of all components and their function within a particular computerized control system, the logical test sequence these systems demand cannot be followed. Minor malfunctions can make a big difference, so it is important to know how each component affects the operation of the overall electronic system to find the ultimate e cause of a problem without replacing good components unnecessarily. It is not enough to use the correct test equipment; the test equipment must be used correctly. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Wiring Harnesses 1 The average automobile contains about / 2 mile of wiring, with hundreds of individual connections. To protect the many wires from damage and to keep them from becoming a confusing tangle, they are organized into bundles, enclosed in plastic or taped together and called wire Print harnesses. Different wiring harnesses serve different parts of the vehicle. Individual wires are color coded to help trace them through a harness where sections are hidden from view. A loose or corroded connection or a replacement wire that is too small for the circuit will add extra resistance and an additional voltage drop to the circuit. A ten percent voltage drop can result in slow or erratic motor operation, for example, even though the circuit is complete. Automotive wiring or circuit conductors can be in any one of three forms: 1. Single strand wire 2. Multistrand wire 3. Printed circuitry Single strand wire has a solid metal core and is usually used inside such components as alternators, motors, relays and other devices. Multistrand wire has a core made of many small strands of wire twisted together into a single conductor. Most of the wiring in an automotive electrical system is made up of multi-strand wire, either as a single conductor or grouped together in a harness. All wiring is color coded on the insulator, either as a solid color or as a colored wire with an identification stripe. A printed circuit is a thin film of copper or other conductor that is printed on an insulator backing. Occasionally, a printed circuit is sandwiched between two sheets of plastic for more protection and flexibility. A complete printed circuit, consisting of conductors, insulating material and connectors for lamps or other components is called a printed circuit board. Printed circuitry is used in place of individual wires or harnesses in places where space is limited, such as behind instrument panels. WIRE GAUGE Since computer controlled automotive electrical systems are very sensitive to changes in resistance, the selection of properly sized wires is critical when systems are repaired. The wire gauge number is an expression of the cross section area of the conductor. The most common system for expressing wire size is the American Wire Gauge (AWG) system. Wire cross section area is measured in circular mils. A mil is 1/1000 in. (0.001in.); a circular mil is the area of a circle one mil in diameter. For example, a conductor 1 / 4 inches in diameter is 0.250 in. or 250 mils. The circular mil cross section area of the wire is 250 squared (250) {255}FD or 62,500 circular mils. Imported car models usually use metric wire gauge designations, which is simply the cross section area of the conductor in square millimeters (mm) {255}FD. Gauge numbers are assigned to conductors of various cross section areas. As gauge number increases, area decreases and the conductor becomes smaller. A 5 gauge conductor is smaller than a 1 gauge conductor and a 10 gauge is smaller than a 5 gauge. As the cross section area of a conductor decreases, resistance increases and so does the gauge number. A conductor with a higher gauge number will carry less current than a conductor with a lower gauge number. Gauge wire size refers to the size of the conductor, not the size of the complete wire. It is possible to have two wires of the same gauge with different diameters because one may have thicker insulation than the other. 12 volt automotive electrical systems generally use 10, 12, 14, 16 and 18 gauge wire. Main power distribution circuits and larger accessories usually use 10 and 12 gauge wire. Battery cables are usually 4 or 6 gauge, although 1 and 2 gauge wires are occasionally used. Wire length must also be considered when making repairs to a circuit. As conductor length increases, so does resistance. An 18 gauge wire, for example, can carry a 10 amp load for 10 feet without excessive voltage drop; however if a 15 foot wire is required for the same 10 amp load, it must be a 16 gauge wire. An electrical schematic shows the electrical current paths when a circuit is operating properly. It is essential to understand how a circuit works before trying to figure out why it doesn't't. Schematics break the entire electrical system down into individual circuits and show only one particular circuit. In a schematic, no attempt is made to represent wiring and components as they physically appear on the vehicle; switches and other components are shown as simply as possible. Face views of harness connectors show the cavity or terminal locations in all multi-pin connectors to help locate test points. If you need to backprobe a connector while it is on the component, the order of the terminals must be mentally reversed. The wire color code can help in this situation, as well as a keyway, lock tab or other reference mark. WIRING REPAIR Soldering is a quick, efficient method of joining metals permanently. Everyone who has the occasion to make wiring repairs should know how to solder. Electrical connections that are soldered are far less likely to come apart and will conduct electricity much better than connections that are only "pig-tailed" together. The most popular (and preferred) method of soldering is with an electrical soldering gun. Soldering irons are available in many sizes and wattage ratings. Irons with higher wattage ratings deliver higher temperatures and recover lost heat faster. A small soldering iron rated for no more than 50 watts is recommended, especially on electrical systems where excess heat can damage the components being soldered. There are three ingredients necessary for successful soldering; proper flux, good solder and sufficient heat. A soldering flux is necessary to clean the metal of tarnish, prepare it for soldering and to enable the solder to spread into tiny crevices. When soldering, always use a resin flux or resin core solder which is non-corrosive and will not attract moisture once the job is finished. Other types of flux (acid core) will leave a residue that will attract moisture and cause the wires to corrode. Tin is a unique metal with a low melting point. In a molten state, it dissolves and alloys easily with many metals. Solder is made by mixing tin with lead. The most common proportions are 40/60, 50/50 and 60/40, with the percentage of tin listed first. Low priced solders usually contain less tin, making them very difficult for a beginner to use because more heat is required to melt the solder. A common solder is 40/60 which is well suited for all-around general use, but 60/40 melts easier, has more tin for a better joint and is preferred for electrical work. Soldering Techniques Successful soldering requires that the metals to be joined be heated to a temperature that will melt the solder-usually 360-460°F (182-238°C). Contrary to popular belief, the purpose of the soldering iron is not to melt the solder itself, but to heat the parts being soldered to a temperature high enough to melt the solder when it is touched to the work. Melting flux-cored solder on the soldering iron will usually destroy the effectiveness of the flux. Soldering tips are made of copper for good heat conductivity, but must be "tinned" regularly for quick transference of heat to the project and to prevent the solder from sticking to the iron. To "tin" the iron, simply heat it and touch the flux-cored solder to the tip; the solder will flow over the hot tip. Wipe the excess off with a clean rag, but be careful as the iron will be hot. After some use, the tip may become pitted. If so, simply dress the tip smooth with a smooth file and "tin" the tip again. An old saying holds that "metals well cleaned are half soldered." Flux-cored solder will remove oxides but rust, bits of insulation and oil or grease must be removed with a wire brush or emery cloth. For maximum strength in soldered parts, the joint must start off clean and tight. Weak joints will result in gaps too wide for the solder to bridge. If a separate soldering flux is used, it should be brushed or swabbed on only those areas that are to be soldered. Most solders contain a core of flux and separate fluxing is unnecessary. Hold the work to be soldered firmly. It is best to solder on a wooden board, because a metal vise will only rob the piece to be soldered of heat and make it difficult to melt the solder. Hold the soldering tip with the broadest face against the work to be soldered. Apply solder under the tip close to the work, using enough solder to give a heavy film between the iron and the piece being soldered, while moving slowly and making sure the solder melts properly. Keep the work level or the solder will run to the lowest part and favor the thicker parts, because these require more heat to melt the solder. If the soldering tip overheats (the solder coating on the face of the tip burns up), it should be retained. Once the soldering is completed, let the soldered joint stand until cool. Tape and seal all soldered wire splices after the repair has cooled. Wire Harness and Connectors The on-board computer (ECM) wire harness electrically connects the control unit to the various solenoids, switches and sensors used by the control system. Most connectors in the engine compartment or otherwise exposed to the elements are protected against moisture and dirt which could create oxidation and deposits on the terminals. This protection is important because of the very low voltage and current levels used by the computer and sensors. All connectors have a lock which secures the male and female terminals together, with a secondary lock holding the seal and terminal into the connector. Both terminal locks must be released when disconnecting ECM connectors. These special connectors are weather-proof and all repairs require the use of a special terminal and the tool required to service it. This tool is used to remove the pin and sleeve terminals. If removal is attempted with an ordinary pick, there is a good chance that the terminal will be bent or deformed. Unlike standard blade type terminals, these terminals cannot be straightened once they are bent. Make certain that the connectors are properly seated and all of the sealing rings in place when connecting leads. On some models, a hinge-type flap provides a backup or secondary locking feature for the terminals. Most secondary locks are used to improve the connector reliability by retaining the terminals if the small terminal lock tangs are not positioned properly. Molded-on connectors require complete replacement of the connection. This means splicing a new connector assembly into the harness. All splices in onboard computer systems should be soldered to insure proper contact. Use care when probing the connections or replacing terminals in them as it is possible to short between opposite terminals. If this happens to the wrong terminal pair, it is possible to damage certain components. Always use jumper wires between connectors for circuit checking and never probe through weatherproof seals. Open circuits are often difficult to locate by sight because corrosion or terminal misalignment are hidden by the connectors. Merely wiggling a connector on a sensor or in the wiring harness may correct the open circuit condition. This should always be considered when an open circuit or a failed sensor is indicated. Intermittent problems may also be caused by oxidized or loose connections. When using a circuit tester for diagnosis, always probe connections from the wire side. Be careful not to damage sealed connectors with test probes. All wiring harnesses should be replaced with identical parts, using the same gauge wire and connectors. When signal wires are spliced into a harness, use wire with high temperature insulation only. With the low voltage and current levels found in the system, it is important that the best possible connection at all wire splices be made by soldering the splices together. It is seldom necessary to replace a complete harness. If replacement is necessary, pay close attention to insure proper harness routing. Secure the harness with suitable plastic wire clamps to prevent vibrations from causing the harness to wear in spots or contact any hot components. Weatherproof connectors cannot be replaced with standard connectors. Instructions are provided with replacement connector and terminal packages. Some wire harnesses have mounting indicators (usually pieces of colored tape) to mark where the harness is to be secured. In making wiring repairs, it's important that you always replace damaged wires with wires that are the same gauge as the wire being replaced. The heavier the wire, the smaller the gauge number. Wires are color-coded to aid in identification and whenever possible the same color coded wire should be used for replacement. A wire stripping and crimping tool is necessary to install solderless terminal connectors. Test all crimps by pulling on the wires; it should not be possible to pull the wires out of a good crimp. Wires which are open, exposed or otherwise damaged are repaired by simple splicing. Where possible, if the wiring harness is accessible and the damaged place in the wire can be located, it is best to open the harness and check for all possible damage. In an inaccessible harness, the wire must be bypassed with a new insert, usually taped to the outside of the old harness. When replacing fusible links, be sure to use fusible link wire, NOT ordinary automotive wire. Make sure the fusible segment is of the same gauge and construction as the one being replaced and double the stripped end when crimping the terminal connector for a good contact. The melted (open) fusible link segment of the wiring harness should be cut off as close to the harness as possible, then a new segment spliced in as described. In the case of a damaged fusible link that feeds two harness wires, the harness connections should be replaced with two fusible link wires so that each circuit will have its own separate protection. Most of the problems caused in the wiring harness are due to bad ground connections. Always check all vehicle ground connections for corrosion or looseness before performing any power feed checks to eliminate the chance of a bad ground affecting the circuit. Repairing Hard Shell Connectors Unlike molded connectors, the terminal contacts in hard shell connectors can be replaced. Weatherproof hard-shell connectors with the leads molded into the shell have non-replaceable terminal ends. Replacement usually involves the use of a special terminal removal tool that depress the locking tangs (barbs) on the connector terminal and allow the connector to be removed from the rear of the shell. The connector shell should be replaced if it shows any evidence of burning, melting, cracks, or breaks. Replace individual terminals that are burnt, corroded, distorted or loose. The insulation crimp must be tight to prevent the insulation from sliding back on the wire when the wire is pulled. The insulation must be visibly compressed under the crimp tabs, and the ends of the crimp should be turned in for a firm grip on the insulation. The wire crimp must be made with all wire strands inside the crimp. The terminal must be fully compressed on the wire strands with the ends of the crimp tabs turned in to make a firm grip on the wire. Check all connections with an ohmmeter to insure a good contact. There should be no measurable resistance between the wire and the terminal when connected. Back to Top Drive Train Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Back-up Light Switch REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print See Figures 1 through 5 Fig. Fig. 1: Back-up light switch location-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 2: Back-up light switch location-1990-93 Integra Fig. Fig. 3: Back-up light switch location, shown with transaxle removed for disassembly-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 4: Back-up light switch location-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 5: Back-up light switch location-Vigor 1. Disconnect the harness connection. Remove the switch harness from the retaining clips. 2. Unscrew the switch from the transmission housing. Be ready to catch any lubricant that drips out. 3. Replace the crush washer on the switch. Install in the transaxle. Torque to 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm). Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide CV-Joint Boot The following procedures are for removing the CV-joint boot from the halfshaft once the halfshaft has been removed from the vehicle. If a quick seal boot is to be used, follow the instructions supplied with the part. REMOVAL & INSTALLATION See Figure 1 Print Fig. Fig. 1: Halfshaft assembly Be sure to mark the roller grooves during disassembly to ensure proper positioning during reassembly. Before disassembly, mark the spider gear and the driveshaft so they can be installed in their original positions. The inboard joint must be removed to replace the boots. 1. Remove the halfshaft that requires the boot change. 2. Remove the front and rear boot retaining bands and slide the boots off the halfshaft. To install: 3. Wrap the spline with vinyl tape to prevent damage to the boots. Install the outboard and inboard boots onto the halfshaft, then remove the vinyl tape. 4. Install the stopper ring onto the driveshaft groove. Also install the dynamic damper at this time, if equipped. 5. Install the spider gear onto the halfshaft by aligning the marks and install it in its original position. 6. Fit the snapring into the halfshaft groove. 7. Pack the outboard joint boot with CV-joint grease only. Do not use a substitute or mix types of grease. 8. Fit the rollers to the spider gear with their high shoulders facing outward. Reinstall the rollers in their original positions on the spider gear. 9. Pack the inboard joint boot with CV-joint grease. 10. Fit the inboard joint onto the halfshaft. Hold the halfshaft assembly so the inboard joint points up to prevent it from falling off. 11. With the boots installed, adjust the CV-joints in or out to place the inner boot ends in the original positions. 12. Install the new boot bands on the boots and bend both sets of locking tabs. Lightly tap on the locking tabs to ensure a good fit. 13. Reinstall the halfshaft. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Halfshaft REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print The halfshaft assembly consists of a sub-axle shaft and a halfshaft with 2 constant velocity (CV) joints. The CV-joints are factory packed with special grease and enclosed in sealed rubber boots. The outer joint cannot be disassembled except for removal of the boot. 1986-89 Integra CAUTION Spindle nut torque is very high. Tighten or loosen the spindle nut only with the vehicle on the ground. Attempting to loosen or torque the spindle nut while the vehicle is on jack stands or a lift may cause the vehicle to fall. 1. Loosen, but do not remove, the front wheel spindle nut with a 32mm socket. 2. Raise and safely support the vehicle. 3. Drain the transaxle. 4. Remove the wheel lug nuts and the wheel. 5. Remove the spindle nut. 6. Using a floor jack to support the lower control arm, remove the lower arm ball joint cotter pin and nut. Make sure a floor jack is positioned securely under the lower control arm, at the ball joint. Otherwise, the lower control arm may jump suddenly away from the steering knuckle as the ball joint is removed. 7. Separate the ball joint from the front hub with a ball joint puller. 8. Slowly lower the floor jack to lower the control arm. 9. Using a small prybar with a 3.5 x 7mm tip, carefully pry out the inboard CV-joint approximately 1 / 2 in. (13mm) in order to force the spring clip out of the groove in the differential side gears. Be careful not to damage the oil seal. Do not pull on the inboard CV-joint, it may come apart. 10. Pull the halfshaft out of the differential or the intermediate shaft. To install: 11. If either the inboard or outboard joint boot bands have been removed for inspection or disassembly of the joint (only the inboard joint can be disassembled), be sure to repack the joint with a sufficient amount of CV-joint grease. 12. Make sure the CV-joint sub-axle bottoms during installation so the spring clip may hold the halfshaft securely in the differential/intermediate shaft groove. Always replace the spring clip with a new one. 13. Torque the ball joint nut to 29 ft. lbs. (40 Nm), then tighten as required to insert a new cotter pin. 14. With the vehicle on the ground, torque the spindle nut to 134 ft. lbs. (185 Nm) and stake the nut. Except 1986-89 Integra CAUTION Spindle nut torque is very high. Tighten or loosen the spindle nut only with the vehicle on the ground. Attempting to loosen or torque the spindle nut while the vehicle is on jack stands or a lift may cause the vehicle to fall. 1. With the vehicle on the ground, raise the locking tab on the spindle nut and loosen it with a suitable socket. 2. Disconnect the negative battery cable. 3. Raise and safely support the vehicle and remove the spindle nut and front wheels. 4. If removing the right side halfshaft, drain the transaxle or differential oil. 5. Remove the damper fork nut and damper pinch bolt. Remove the damper fork. 6. Remove the lower ball joint nut and separate the lower ball joint using a suitable puller with the pawls applied to the lower arm. 7. Pull the knuckle outward and remove the halfshaft outboard CV-joint from the knuckle using a suitable plastic mallet. 8. Using a small prybar with a 3.5 x 7mm tip, carefully pry out the inboard CV-joint approximately 1 / 2 in. (13mm) in order to force the spring clip out of the groove in the differential side gears. Be careful not to damage the oil seal. Do not pull on the inboard CV-joint, it may come apart. 9. Pull the halfshaft out of the differential or the intermediate shaft. 10. To remove the intermediate shaft, remove the 3 bolts. Lower the bearing support close to the steering gear box and remove the intermediate shaft from the differential. To prevent any damage from the differential oil seal, hold the intermediate shaft horizontal until it is clear of the differential. To install: 11. If either the inboard or outboard joint boot bands have been removed for inspection or disassembly of the joint (only the inboard joint can be disassembled), be sure to repack the joint with a sufficient amount of the correct CV-joint grease. 12. Always use a new set ring whenever the driveshaft is being installed. Be sure the driveshaft locks in the differential side gear groove and that the CV-joint subaxle bottoms in the differential or the intermediate shaft. 13. Torque the ball joint nut to 40 ft. lbs. (55 Nm) on Integra, 43 ft. lbs. (60 Nm) on Vigor or 54 ft. lbs. (75 Nm) on Legend. Then tighten the nut as required to install a new cotter pin. 14. Torque the lower damper nut and bolt to 47 ft. lbs. (65 Nm) and the upper pinch bolt to 32 ft. lbs. (44 Nm). 15. With the vehicle on the ground, torque the spindle nut, then stake the nut. Vigor-180 ft. lbs. (250 Nm) 1986-90 Legend-180 ft. lbs. (250 Nm) 1991-93 Legend-242 ft. lbs. (335 Nm) 1990-93 Integra- 134 ft. lbs. (185 Nm) Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Identification A 5-speed synchronized manual transmission is available for all models. Only one gearbox is offered for each family; there are no optional ratios or gear arrangements. The transaxle number stamped on the case indicates the family and running serial number for the transaxle. In general, transaxles are not interchangeable between model families. Print Transaxles are selected by the manufacturer to fit the engine performance characteristics of the car with consideration to other variables such as area of sale, emission class, vehicle loading, brakes, etc. Even if a replacement unit physically fit into a dissimilar car, the performance of the transaxle would be a poor match to the present engine; driveability, fuel economy and emissions would suffer. If you're considering replacing the transaxle rather than repairing a failure, stick to the same transaxle group; i.e., if the old unit's trans number was YS1, then that is also what the replacement unit must be. Transaxle identification numbers begin with the following groups: 1986-89 Integra: CG 1990-93 Integra: YS1 1986-90 Legend: G3T4 1991-93 Legend: K4A6 Vigor: L3A3 Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Intermediate Shaft REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print 1. Raise and safely support the vehicle and drain the oil from the transaxle. 2. Remove the halfshaft and the bearing heat shield, if equipped. 3. Remove the 3 bearing support bolts. 4. On Vigor and 1991-93 Legend, slide the shaft out of the oil pan. On all other models, lower the bearing support close to the steering gearbox and remove the intermediate shaft from the differential. To avoid damage to the differential oil seal, hold the intermediate shaft horizontal until it clears the differential. 5. To install, reverse the removal procedure. Torque the bearing support bolts to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm) for 8mm bolts, or 29 ft. lbs. (40 Nm) for 10mm bolts. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Overhaul 1986-89 INTEGRA Print See Figures 1 through 16 Fig. Fig. 1: Transaxle components-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 2: Transaxle components-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 3: Measuring clearance at the reverse idler gear-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 4: Measuring clearance at the reverse shift fork-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 5: Shaft identification-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 6: Mainshaft components-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 7: Countershaft components-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 8: The longer teeth must be matched with the deeper grooves in the hub-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 9: Check the mainshaft diameters at these points-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 10: Check the countershaft diameters at these points-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 11: Mainshaft assembly-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 12: Countershaft assembly-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 13: Shift arm holder assembly-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 14: Install the detent balls and springs in the proper order-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 15: Torque the cover bolts to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm) in the sequence shown-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 16: Shifter components-1986-89 Integra WARNING The use of the correct special tools or their equivalent is REQUIRED for this procedure. Cleanliness is an important factor in the overhaul of this guide transaxle. Before opening up the unit, the entire outside of the transaxle assembly should be cleaned, preferably with a high pressure washer such as a car wash spray unit. Dirt entering the transaxle internal parts will negate all the time and effort spent on the overhaul. During inspection and reassembly all parts should be thoroughly cleaned with solvent, then dried with compressed air. Wiping cloths and rags should not be used to dry parts. Wheel bearing grease, long used to hold thrust washers and lubricate parts, should not be used. Lube seals with clean transaxle oil and use ordinary (unmedicated) petroleum jelly to hold the thrust washers. This will ease the assembly of seals, since it will not leave a harmful residue as grease often does. Do not use solvent on neoprene seals, if they are to be reused, or thrust washers. Before installing bolts into aluminum parts, always dip the threads into clean transaxle oil. Antiseize compound can also be used to prevent bolts from galling the aluminum and seizing. Always use a torque wrench to keep from stripping the threads.The internal snaprings should be expanded and the external rings should be compressed using proper tools. Transaxle DISASSEMBLY 1. Remove the transaxle end cover. 2. Install the mainshaft holder tool 07923-6890101. Shift the transaxle into reverse. 3. Remove the mainshaft and countershaft locknuts. The mainshaft locknut has left-hand threads. 4. Drive out the spring pin securing the 5th gear shift fork to the shaft. 5. Remove the mainshaft 5th gear, shift fork, synchro sleeve,hub ring and spring as an assembly. 6. Remove countershaft 5th gear. 7. Remove the 3 retaining screws, washers, springs and detent balls. 8. Remove the reverse light switch. 9. Remove the 13 housing bolts. 10. Loosen the housing by tapping on its edge with a soft hammer or mallet. To separate the transaxle housing from the clutch housing, remove the attachment from the bearing remover 07936-6340000, or equivalent, and screw the threaded end into the hole in the transmission housing. Expand the snapring while operating the bearing remover as a slide hammer. 11. Before removing the reverse shift fork, measure the clearance between the reverse shift fork and the 5th/reverse shift shaft pin. The specification is 0.05-0.50mm (0.002-0.020 in). If not within specification, measure the width of the slot in the reverse shift fork. The maximum width is 0.285 in. (7.25mm). Replace the fork if not within specification. 12. Measure the clearance between the reverse idler gear and the shift fork. The specification is 0.20-1.7mm (0.008-0.070 in). If not within specification, remove the fork and measure the distance between the shift fork pawls. The specification is 11.8-12.1mm (0.46-0.48 in.) Replace the shift fork if not within specification. 13. Remove the reverse shift fork/shift arm holder if not already removed. 14. Shift the transaxle into neutral. Remove the mainshaft bearing retainer plate. 15. Pull out the shift guide shaft. 16. Remove the reverse idler shaft and gear. 17. Pull the 3rd/4th and 1st/2nd shift shafts up, to shift into 4th and 2nd gears. Remove the 5th/reverse shift shaft by pulling it up while lifting the reverse shift fork. 18. Measure the clearance between the collar and shim on the selector arm shaft. The specification is 0.01-0.20mm (0.0004-0.0080 in). If not within specification, disassemble the shift arm holder and replace the shim. Selective shims are available in 0.008 in. (0.20mm) increments from 0.0310.063 in. (0.80-1.60mm). 19. Measure the shift arm to shift guide clearance. The specification is 0.10-0.60mm (0.004-0.024 in). If not within specification, measure the width of the slot in the shift guide. The maximum width is 8.00mm (0.315 in). If wider than the maximum, replace the shift guide. 20. Measure the selector arm to interlock clearance. The specification is 0.70-0.25mm (0.002-0.030 in). If not within specification, measure the gap between the selector arm fingers. The maximum allowable gap is 10.15mm (0.40 in). If wider than specifications, replace the arm. 21. Measure the shift arm to shift rod guide clearance. The specification is (0.05-0.80mm 0.002-0.03 in). If not within specification measure the width of the slot in the shift rod guide. The maximum width is (12.0mm 0.47 in). If not within specification, replace the shift rod guide. If within specification, measure the width of the tab on the selector arm. The minimum width is 11.9mm (0.46 in). If it is too narrow, replace the arm. 22. Tilt the interlock and shift guide to the side and lift them out. 23. Remove the countershaft and mainshaft together as an assembly along with the 1st/2nd and 3rd/4th shift shafts. Inspect the shafts, especially the detent grooves for damage. 24. Remove the shift rod and boot. Inspect the rod for damage and the boot for rips. 25. Remove the differential assembly. 26. Remove the snapring in the transaxle housing. Drive out the axle seals from both housings. 27. Remove the bearing retainer plate. 28. Insert the bearing remover, or equivalent with attachment 07936-6890101 or 07736-A01000A into the countershaft bearing. Operate the slide hammer to remove the bearing. 29. Remove the oil barrier plate, wash thoroughly and reinstall. Unless the countershaft needle bearing is to be replaced, reinstall it. 30. Reinstall the bearing retainer plate, tighten the screw with an impact driver and stake the screw heads. 31. Remove the mainshaft bearing seal from the clutch housing. Do not remove the mainshaft bearing unless it rotates roughly and is to be replaced. 32. Remove the mainshaft and countershaft bearings from the transaxle housing by expanding each snapring and pushing the bearing out by hand. Do not remove the snaprings unless it is necessary to clean their grooves. Countershaft Assembly CHECKING CLEARANCES Before disassembling the countershaft assembly, perform the following measurements. If any measurement is not within specifications, disassemble the countershaft assembly and replace thrust washers as required. If all measurements are within specifications, there is no reason to disassemble the countershaft assembly except in cases of physical damage. 1. Measure the clearance between the 1st gear thrust washer and the shoulder on 1st gear. The specification is 0.001-0.003in. (0.03-0.08mm). 2. Measure the clearance between the shoulder on 3rd gear and the shoulder on 2nd gear. The specification is 0.001-0.007in. (0.03-0.18mm). If out of specification, measure the thickness of 2nd gear. The specification is 1.192-1.120 in. (30.30-30.47mm). 3. If any of the measurements are not within specifications, calculate the thickness needed to bring the measurement within the service limit before disassembling the unit. DISASSEMBLY 1. Remove 5th gear. 2. Remove the ball bearing, 4th gear and the spacer collar. 3. Remove the 3rd gear, the needle bearing, spacer collar. 4. Remove 2nd gear. 5. Remove the synchro ring, spring, sleeve, hub, spring and ring. 6. Remove 1st gear. 7. Remove the needle bearing and the thrust washer. INSPECTION 1. Inspect the needle bearing for wear or damage. 2. Check the clearance between each shift fork and its matching synchro sleeve. The specification is 0.014-0.039 in. (0.35-1.00mm). If the clearance exceeds the specification, measure the width of the groove in the synchro sleeve. The specification is 0.266-0.270 in. (6.75-6.85mm). 3. Inspect the gear teeth on all synchro hubs and sleeves for rounded corners, indicating wear. 4. Install each hub in its mating sleeve and check for freedom of movement. If replacement is required, replace them as an assembly. 5. Inspect the inside of the synchro ring and the synchro ring teeth and matching teeth on the gear for wear in the form of rounding. 6. Inspect the gear hub thrust and cone surfaces for wear. 7. Inspect the teeth on all gears for uneven wear, scoring, galling or cracks. 8. Place the synchro ring on the matching gear cone and rotate it until it stops. The ring to gear clearance specification is 0.016-0.029 in. (0.401.18mm). Remove the ring from the gear. 9. Inspect the oil passages for clogging. Inspect the splines on the countershaft for damage. 10. Measure the outside diameter of the bearing surface on the end opposite the threaded end. The specification is 1.297-1.300 in. (32.95-33.02mm). 11. Measure the outside diameter of the bearing surface in front of the countershaft gear. The specification is 1.336-1.339 in. (33.93-34.00mm). 12. Measure the outside diameter of the bearing surface nearest the threaded end. The specification is 0.981-0.984 in. (24.93-25.00mm). 13. Inspect the countershaft for run-out. The maximum allowable run-out is 0.002 in. (0.05mm). Replace the countershaft if any measurement is not within specification. ASSEMBLY Clean all parts thoroughly with solvent and dry with compressed air. Lubricate all parts with oil before assembling. Each synchro sleeve has 3 sets of longer teeth 120° apart that must be matched with the 3 sets of deeper grooves in the hub when assembled. 1. Install the thrust washer and needle bearing. 2. Install 1st gear. 3. Install the synchro ring, spring, hub, sleeve, spring and ring. 4. Install 2nd gear. 5. Install the spacer collar, needle bearing and 3rd gear. 6. Install the spacer collar, 4th gear and 3rd gear. 7. Install 5th gear. Mainshaft CHECKING CLEARANCES Before disassembling the mainshaft assembly, perform the following measurements. If any measurement is not within specifications, disassemble the mainshaft assembly and replace thrust washers as required. If all measurements are within specifications, there is no reason to disassemble the countershaft assembly, providing there is no damage to any of its components. 1. Measure the clearance between the shoulder on 4th gear and the spacer collar. The specification is 0.001-0.007 in. (0.03-0.18mm). If out of specification, measure the thickness of 4th gear. The specification is 1.232-1.240 in. (31.30-31.47mm). 2. Measure the clearance between the shoulder on 3rd gear and the shoulder on 2nd gear. The specification is 0.001-0.007 in. (0.03-0.18mm). If out of specification, measure the thickness of 3rd gear. The specification is 1.232-1.240 (31.30-31.47mm). 3. Measure the clearance between the shoulder on 5th gear and the spacer collar. The specification is 0.001-0.005 in. (0.03-0.13mm). If out of specification, measure the thickness of 5th gear. The specification is 1.272-1.278 (32.30-32.47mm). 4. Measure the clearance between the 28mm spacer and the ball bearing. The specification is 0-0.004 in. (0-0.010mm). If not within specification, replace the spacer washer. Selective spacer washers are available in the following sizes: A - 0.074-0.075 in. (1.88-1.92mm) B - 0.076-0.078 in. (1.94-1.98mm) C - 0.079-0.080 in. (2.00-2.04mm) D - 0.081-0.082 in. (2.06-2.10mm) E - 0.083-0.084 in. (2.12-2.16mm) 5. If any of the measurements are not within specifications, calculate the thickness of washers needed to bring the measurement back within the serviceable limit before disassembling the unit. DISASSEMBLY 1. Remove the synchro sleeve, hub, spring and ring. 2. Remove 5th gear. 3. Remove the needle bearing, spacer collar and mainshaft needle bearing. 4. Remove the spacer collar and needle bearing. 5. Remove 4th gear. 6. Remove the synchro ring, spring, sleeve, hub, spring and ring. 7. Remove 3rd gear and the needle bearing. INSPECTION 1. Inspect the needle bearings for wear or damage. 2. Inspect the inside of the synchro rings for wear. 3. Install each hub in its mating sleeve and check for freedom of movement. If replacement is required, replace them as an assembly. 4. Inspect the synchro ring teeth and matching teeth on the gears for wear in the form of rounding. 5. Inspect the gear hub thrust and cone surfaces for wear. 6. Inspect the teeth on all gears for uneven wear, scoring, galling or cracks. 7. Place the synchro ring on the matching gear cone and rotate it until it stops. The ring to gear clearance specification is0.016-0.029 in. (0.401.18mm). Remove the ring from the gear. 8. Inspect the splines and gear teeth on the mainshaft for damage or excessive wear. 9. Inspect the oil passages for clogging. 10. Measure the outer diameter of the ball bearing contact area in front of 1st gear. The specification is 1.100-1.103 in. (27.95-28.12mm). 11. Measure the outer diameter of the 3rd gear needle bearing contact area. The specification is 1.257-1.260 in. (31.93-32.00mm). 12. Measure the outer diameter of the needle bearing contact area in front of the 5th synchro hub splines. The specification is 0.980-0.984 in. (24.9325.00mm). ASSEMBLY 1. Install the 3rd gear and the needle bearing. 2. Replace the synchro ring, spring, sleeve, hub, spring and ring. 3. Install 4th gear, the spacer collar and needle bearing. 4. Install the mainshaft needle bearing, spacer collar and needle bearing. 5. Install 5th gear, synchro sleeve, hub, spring and ring. Shift Arm Holder DISASSEMBLY 1. Remove the roll pin on the end of the shaft. 2. Remove the collar. 3. Remove the washer. 4. Remove the shim. 5. Remove the spring. 6. Remove the selector arm. INSPECTION 1. Inspect the spring, shim and washer for deformation and rust. 2. Inspect the hole in the center of the holder for wear. 3. Inspect the selector arm for wear or bending. 4. Inspect the roll pin bore for expansion. ASSEMBLY 1. Install the selector arm to the shaft on the holder. 2. Install the spring making sure to engage the ends correctly. 3. Install the chosen selective shim, if changed. 4. Install the washer. 5. Install the collar and roll pin. Transaxle ASSEMBLY 1. Install the mainshaft bearing to the clutch housing if it was removed. Install a new seal. 2. Install the mainshaft and countershaft bearings to the transaxle housing. 3. Install the shift rod with the detent notches facing downward. Install the spring and detent ball. Push the detent ball in and install the rod fully. 4. Install the shift rod guide and torque the bolt 22 ft. lbs (30 Nm). 5. Hook the selector arm into the shift rod guide and install the shift arm holder. Torque the longer bolts to 11 ft. lbs. (15 Nm) and the shorter bolt to 9 ft. lbs (12 Nm). 6. Install the differential assembly in the clutch housing. 7. Install the mainshaft, countershaft, 1st/2nd shift shaft, 3rd/4th shift shaft and both forks together as an assembly. 8. Lift the mainshaft and install the interlock into the selector arm. Place the shift rod in neutral. 9. Hook the interlock into the selector arm, 1st/2nd shift shaft and 3rd/4th shift shaft. Hook the shift guide into the shift arm. 10. Install the 5th/reverse shift shaft and hook its pin into the reverse shift fork slot. 11. Install the shift guide shaft so it bottoms securely in the clutch housing hole. The end of the shaft should not extend more than 1 / 2 in. (13mm) above the interlock. Do not continue until this measurement is correct. 12. Install the mainshaft bearing retainer plate. Tighten the bolts to 21 ft. lbs (28 Nm). 13. Install the reverse idler gear and shaft. 14. Install the reverse light switch with a new washer. 15. Thoroughly clean and dry the mating surfaces of the transaxle and clutch housings and install a new gasket to the clutch housing. 16. Shift the transaxle into 3rd gear. Install the transaxle housing, being careful to line up shafts. The shift guide shaft must seat in the blind hole in the transaxle housing. Do not force the installation. 17. Tighten the bolts to 21 ft. lbs (28 Nm). 18. Install the detent balls, new washers, springs and retaining bolts. Torque the bolts to 16 ft. lbs (22 Nm). 19. Install the countershaft 5th gear with the dished side facing down. Install the spring washer with the dished surface facing 5th gear. 20. Install the spacer collar and needle bearing on the mainshaft. 21. Install mainshaft 5th gear. 22. Install the synchro ring, spring, hub and sleeve on the mainshaft. 23. Install the 5th shift fork onto the synchro sleeve and install the roll pin. 24. Install the spring washer with the dished surface facing the synchro hub. 25. Install the mainshaft holder tool 07923-6890101, then shift the transaxle into reverse. 26. Install the mainshaft and countershaft locknuts. Tighten them one at a time to 65 ft. lbs. (90 Nm), loosen the nut, then retorque to the same setting. Stake the locknuts in place after the procedure is complete. The mainshaft locknut has left-hand threads. 27. Clean the mating surfaces of the housing and the end cover. Install the end cover with a new gasket. Tighten the bolts to 9 ft. lbs. (12 Nm). 28. Install the snapring into the axle opening in the transaxle housing, aligning the lug on the snapring with the slot in the housing. 29. Lubricate and install new axle seals using driver 07749-0010000 and attachment 07947-6110500. 1989-93 INTEGRA See Figures 17 through 42 Fig. Fig. 17: Shifter components-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 18: Shifter components-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 19: Shifter components-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 20: Transaxle components-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 21: Remove these components before separating the housing-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 22: Remove the snapring beneath the sealing bolt-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 23: Remove the thrust shim and oil guide plate-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 24: Remove the oil gutter by prying the hook-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 25: Reverse shift fork measurements-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 26: Change holder components-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 27: Tape the spines on the shaft before removing-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 28: Remove the chamber plate-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 29: Shift rod components-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 30: Shift fork components-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 31: Mainshaft components-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 32: Mainshaft measurement points-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 33: Countershaft components-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 34: Countershaft measurement points-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 35: Bend the tabs down on the bearing retainer plate-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 36: Measure this height to the top of the 28mm thrust washer-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 37: Measure the distance between the inner race to the housing surface-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 38: Measuring the thrust clearance-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 39: Assembling the shift rod-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 40: Install the chamber plate-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 41: Install the gear assembly with the 28mm spring washer concave face towards the gears-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 42: Install these components with new washers-1986-89 Integra 1. Remove the reverse light switch, the transaxle hanger, set bolts, springs and balls. Remove the reverse idler shaft bolt and washer. 2. Remove the bolts from the transaxle housing. Loosen them in a diagonal pattern a few threads at a time. Do not remove the housing from the transaxle yet. 3. Remove the 32mm sealing bolt from the rear of the transaxle housing. Reaching into the hole, expand the snapring on the countershaft ball bearing and remove it from its groove. 4. Remove the transaxle housing from the clutch housing. 5. Remove the thrust shim snapring and the oil guide from the housing. 6. Remove the 16mm sealing bolt. 7. Remove the oil gutter plate from the transaxle housing. 8. Before removing the reverse shift fork, measure the clearance between the reverse shift fork and the 5th/reverse shift piece pin. The specification is 0.002-0.018 in. (0.05-0.45mm) on the reverse side and 0.016-0.035 in. (0.40-0.90mm) on the 5th side. If beyond specification, measure the width of the L-groove in the reverse shift fork. The maximum width is 0.285 in. (7.25mm) on the reverse side and 0.303 in. (7.70mm) on the 5th side. Replace the fork if beyond specifications. 9. Measure the clearance between the reverse idler gear and the shift fork. The specification is 0.020-0.071 in. (0.50-1.8mm). If beyond specification, remove the fork and measure the distance between the shift fork pawls. The specification is 0.512-0.524 in. (13.0-13.3mm). Replace the shift fork if beyond specifications. 10. Remove the reverse shift fork if it was not removed in the previous step. Remove the reverse idler shaft and reverse idler gear from the the clutch housing. 11. Check the clearance between the shift piece and the shift arm. The service limit is 0.024 in. (0.6mm). If the clearance exceeds this measurement, check the width of the shift piece groove. The standard width is 0.319-0.329 in. (8.1-8.2mm). 12. Check the clearance between the select arm and the interlock. The service limit is 0.020 in. (0.5mm). If the clearance exceeds this measurement, check the width of the interlock. The standard width is 0.390-0.394 in. (9.9-10.0mm). 13. Check the clearance between the select arm and the thrust shim. The standard size is 0.0004-0.008 in. (0.01-0.20mm). If the clearance exceeds this measurement, install a thrust shim to bring the measurement to specification. Thrust shims are available from 0.031 in. (0.8mm) through 0.063 in. (1.6mm) in 5 steps. 14. Check the clearance between the shift arm and the change piece. The service limit is 0.031 in. (0.8mm). If the clearance exceeds this measurement, check the width of the change piece groove. The standard width is 0.465-0.472 in. (11.8-12.0mm). 15. Check the clearance between the select arm and the change piece. The service limit is 0.020 in. (0.5mm). If the clearance exceeds this measurement, check the width of the change piece groove. The standard width is 0.474-0.478 in. (12.05-12.15mm). 16. Remove the mainshaft and countershaft assemblies along with the shift fork assembly with thrust washer. Wrap tape around the splines to prevent damage to the seal if not replacing. 17. Remove the differential assembly from the clutch housing. Remove the chamber plate next to the bearings. 18. Check the synchro clearance at the shift fork fingers. The service limit is 0.039 in. (1.0mm). If the clearance is excessive, check the width of the shift fork fingers. The standard size is 0.291-0.295 in. (7.4-7.5mm) 19. Check the clearance between the shift piece and the shift fork shafts. The service limit is 0.031 in. (0.8mm). If the clearance exceeds this measurement, check the width of the shift piece. The standard width is 0.469-0.472 in. (11.9-12.0mm). 20. Measure the clearance between 2nd and 3rd gear. The service limit is 0.0118 in. (0.3mm). The service limit of 3rd gear width is 1.350 in. (34.3mm) with the B17A1 engine and 1.331 in. (33.8mm) with the B18A1 engine. 21. Measure the clearance between 4th gear and the spacer collar. The service limit is 0.0118 in. (0.3mm). The standard width of the 4th gear side of the spacer collar is 1.025-1.027 in. (26.03-26.08mm). The service limit of 4th gear width is 1.232 in. (31.3mm) for the B17A1 engine and 1.213 in. (30.8mm) for the B18A1 engine. 22. Measure the clearance between 5th gear and the spacer collar. The service limit is 0.0118 in. (0.3mm). The standard width of the 5th gear side of the spacer collar is 1.025-1.027 in. (26.03-26.08mm). The service limit of 5rd gear width is 1.232 in. (31.3mm). 23. Check the clearance between 1st gear and the 60mm thrust shim. The service clearance should be 0.0016-0.0047 in. (0.04-0.12mm). Correct with a shim, available from 0.0768 in. (1.95mm) to 0.0827 in. (2.10mm) in 16 steps. 24. Measure the distance between 2nd and 3rd gear. The service clearance should be 0.002-0.0047 in. (0.05-0.12mm). Correct with a new spacer collar available in 2 widths, 1.1425-1.1433 in. (29.02-29.04mm) and 1.1445-1.1453 in. (29.07-29.09mm). 25. Disassemble the mainshaft. Inspect the mainshaft for bearing surface wear. The bearing surface A service diameter limit of 1.0996 in. (27.93mm). The bearing surface B service diameter limit of 1.4933 in. (37.930mm). The bearing surface C service diameter limit of 1.0999 in. (27.940mm). Replace if any of the measurements are below these limits. 26. Disassemble the countershaft. Inspect the countershaft for bearing surface wear. The bearing surface A service diameter limit of 0.9819 in. (24.940mm). The bearing surface B service diameter limit of 1.4539 in. (36.930mm). The bearing surface C service diameter limit of 1.2972 in. (32.950mm). Replace if any of the measurements are below these limits. 27. Check the run-out of the mainshaft and countershaft. If the run-out exceeds the service limit of 0.0020 in. (0.05mm), replace the shaft. 28. Remove the mainshaft bearing and oil seal from the clutch side of the clutch housing. 29. Remove the retaining plate and countershaft needle bearing from the clutch housing using the adjustable bearing remover 07736-A01000A or equivalent and a slide hammer. 30. Remove the differential oil seals. 31. Remove the 72mm thrust shim and the oil guide plate. 32. Install the 3/4 synchro hub, spacer collar, 5th synchro hub, collar, 28mm thrust washer and ball bearing on the mainshaft. Make sure the clutch side ball bearing is not installed on the mainshaft. Install the assembly in the transaxle case. 33. Measure the distance between the end of the transaxle case and the top of 28mm thrust washer. Make the measurement at 3 places, average the results and record the final answer. 34. Measure the distance between the end of the clutch housing and the bearing inner race. Make the measurement at 3 places, average the results and record the final answer. 35. Add the results of the 2 measurements and subtract 0.039 in. (1.0mm). Use this as the shim thickness for the 72mm shim. Shims are available from 0.0236 in. (0.60mm) through 0.0709 in. (1.80mm) in 41 equal steps. 36. Install the selected shim(s) in the transaxle case. 37. Install the spring washer on the mainshaft, concave side facing mainshaft 1st gear. 38. Install the mainshaft in the clutch housing. 39. Clean all dirt from the mating surfaces of the transaxle and clutch housings and install the transaxle housing to the clutch housing. Torque the 8mm bolts to 20 ft. lbs. (28 Nm) and 10mm bolts to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm). 40. Tap the mainshaft with a plastic hammer. 41. Install the collar and shaft holder of the mainshaft thrust clearance inspection tool 07GAJ-PG20101 to the mainshaft and tighten the 3 Allen bolts into the groove below the splines. Make sure they are positioned correctly and not digging into the splines. 42. Position a dial indicator so the pin rests on the outer circumference of the tip of the mainshaft. 43. Turn the bolt clockwise and read the clearance. Do not turn the bolt more than 60° after the needle of the dial indicator has stopped increasing. 44. The clearance specification for is 0.004-0.007 in. (0.11-0.18mm). If the clearance is not within specifications, repeat the entire procedure. Do not continue until the correct clearance has been obtained. 45. When the correct clearance has been obtained, disassemble the transaxle and assemble the mainshaft and countershaft completely. To assemble: 46. Install the differential assembly in the clutch housing. 47. Install the mainshaft and countershaft bearings in the clutch housing. 48. Install the spring washer to the bottom of the mainshaft and install the mainshaft, countershaft and shift forks together as as assembly. 49. Install the change holder, shift piece and interlock. 50. Install the reverse idler gear and idler gear shaft in the clutch housing. Install the reverse shift fork in the clutch housing. Make sure the pin is engaged with the slot in the fork. Torque the bolts to 11 ft. lbs. (15 Nm). 51. Install the oil guide plate and selected shim(s) into the transaxle housing. 52. Install the oil gutter plate in the transaxle housing. Bend the hook into place and torque the 16mm sealing bolt to 22 ft. lbs. (30 Nm). 53. Thoroughly clean and dry the mating surfaces of the transaxle and clutch housings. Apply sealant, part number 08718-550000 or equivalent to the clutch housing. 54. Install the transaxle housing to the clutch housing, being careful to line up the shafts. 55. Install the snapring to the countershaft ball bearing through the hole at the top of the transaxle housing. Install the 32mm sealing bolt and torque to 18 ft. lbs. (25 Nm). 56. Torque the housing 8mm bolts to 20 ft. lbs. (28 Nm) in the proper sequence. 57. Install the reverse idler shaft bolt with new washer. Torque the bolt to 40 ft. lbs. (55 Nm). 58. Install the reverse light switch and new washer. Install the transmission hanger and set screws with springs and balls. Torque to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). 1986-90 LEGEND See Figures 43 through 62 Fig. Fig. 43: Transaxle components-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 44: Remove these components-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 45: Remove the reverse idler shaft bolt and bracket-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 46: Remove the snapring-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 47: Shift arm assembly-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 48: Measure this height-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 49: Measure this height-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 50: Checking the thrust clearance-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 51: Mainshaft components-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 52: Countershaft components-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 53: Measure these points on the mainshaft-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 54: Measure these points on the countershaft-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 55: Shift rod assembly-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 56: Replace the detent ball-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 57: Install the shift rod guide-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 58: Install the shift arm holder-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 59: Torque the housing bolts in this order-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 60: Replace the idler shaft bolt-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 61: Replace the components-1986-1990 Legend Fig. Fig. 62: Replace the 32mm sealing bolt-1986-1990 Legend 1. Remove the reverse light switch and neutral switch. 2. Remove the ball spring setting screw and washer. Remove the spring and detent ball from the transaxle housing. 3. Remove the reverse idler shaft bolt. 4. Remove the bolts attaching the transaxle housing to the clutch housing. 5. Remove the 32mm sealing bolt. The 16mm sealing bolt does not have to be removed to disassemble the transaxle. 6. Reach into the hole and expand the countershaft ball bearing snapring, removing it from the groove. 7. Separate the transaxle housing from the clutch housing. 8. Remove the thrust shim(s) and oil guide plate from the transaxle housing. 9. Before removing the reverse shift fork, measure the clearance between the reverse shift fork and the 5th/reverse shift pin. The specification is 0.002-0.020 in. (0.05-0.50mm). If beyond specification, measure the width of the L-groove in the reverse shift fork. The maximum width is 0.285 in. (7.25mm). Replace the fork if beyond specifications. 10. Measure the clearance between the reverse idler gear and the shift fork. The specification is 0.020-0.071 in. (0.50-1.8mm). If beyond specification, remove the fork and measure the distance between the shift fork pawls. The specification is 0.512-0.524 in. (13.0-13.3mm). Replace the shift fork if beyond specifications. 11. Remove the reverse shift fork if it was not removed in the previous step. Remove the reverse idler shaft, washer and reverse idler gear from the the clutch housing. 12. Measure the clearance between the shift arm and the shift guide. The specification is 0.008-0.022 in. (0.20-0.55mm). If the clearance is not within specifications, measure the width of the groove in the shift guide. The maximum width is 0.323 in. (8.20mm). Replace the shift guide if the width is beyond specification. 13. Remove the shift arm assembly from the clutch housing. 14. Remove the mainshaft and countershaft assemblies together with the shift fork assembly. 15. Remove the differential assembly. Remove the shift rod guide. 16. Remove the detent ball and spring from the clutch housing. 17. Remove the shift rod and boot from the clutch housing. 18. Remove the roll pin, clip and shift joint end from the shift rod. 19. Remove the mainshaft bearing and oil seal from the clutch side of the clutch housing. 20. Remove the countershaft bearing retaining plate from the clutch housing. Remove the magnetic plate. 21. Remove the countershaft needle bearing from the clutch housing using the adjustable bearing remover 07736-A01000A and a slide hammer. 22. Remove the differential oil seals. 23. Disassemble the shift fork shafts. Remove the roll pin from the 5th/reverse shift guide. Remove the 5th and 3rd/4th shift forks from the shaft. Remove the 1st/2nd shift fork from its shaft. 24. Inspect the shift fork bores for scoring and excessive wear. Inspect the shift fork pawls for cracks and wear. Inspect the shafts for scoring, damage and excessive wear. 25. Install the 1st/2nd shift fork on its shaft. Install the 5th and 3rd/4th shift forks on the shaft. Install the roll pin. 26. Remove the shift shaft. Remove the shift arm holder from the shift guide. Remove the shift guide. 27. Inspect the springs for deformation and rust. Inspect the shift arm holder for scoring and pitting. Inspect the shift guide for wear. 28. Measure the width of the groove in the change piece. The maximum width is 0.522 in. (13.25mm). If not within specification, replace the change piece. 29. Measure the clearance between the interlock and the change piece. The specification is 0.002-0.020 in. (0.05-0.50mm). If the clearance is not within specifications, measure the outside diameter of the interlock. The specification is 0.474-0.478 in. (12.05-12.15mm). If not within specification, replace the interlock. 30. Assemble the shift guide and interlock. Engage the shift arm holder with the shift guide. Install the shift shaft. Before disassembling the mainshaft assembly, perform the following measurements. If any measurement is not within specifications, disassemble the mainshaft assembly and replace parts as required. If all measurements are within specifications, there is no reason to disassemble the mainshaft assembly, providing there is no damage to any of its components. 31. Push down on the bearing race with a suitable socket and measure the clearance between 2nd and 3rd gears. The specification is 0.002-0.012 in. (0.06-0.30mm). If not within specifications, disassemble the mainshaft and inspect 3rd gear. 32. Measure the clearance between 4th gear and the spacer collar. The specification is 0.002-0.012 in. (0.06-0.30mm). If not within specifications, disassemble the mainshaft and inspect 4th gear and the spacer collar. 33. Measure the clearance between 5th gear and the spacer collar. The specification is 0.002-0.012 in. (0.06-0.30mm). If not within specifications, disassemble the mainshaft and inspect 5th gear and the spacer collar. 34. Remove the ball bearing from the end of the mainshaft. 35. Remove the 5th synchro hub, sleeve, spring and ring. 36. Remove 5th gear. 37. Remove the first needle bearing, spacer collar and the second needle bearing. 38. Remove 4th gear. 39. Remove the 3/4 synchro sleeve, first ring, first spring, hub, second spring and second ring. 40. Remove 3rd gear and the needle bearing. 41. Inspect the needle bearings for wear or damage. Inspect the inside of the synchro rings for wear. 42. Install each hub in its mating sleeve and check for freedom of movement. If replacement is required, replace them as an assembly. 43. Inspect the synchro ring teeth and matching teeth on the gears for wear in the form of rounding. 44. Inspect the gear hub thrust and cone surfaces for wear. 45. Inspect the teeth on all gears for uneven wear, scoring, galling or cracks. 46. Place the synchro ring on the matching gear cone and rotate it until it stops. The ring to gear clearance specification is 0.016-0.043 in. (0.401.10mm). Remove the ring from the gear. 47. Inspect the splines and gear teeth on the mainshaft for damage or excessive wear. 48. Inspect the oil passages for clogging. 49. If the clearance between 2nd and 3rd gears was not within specification, measure the thickness of 3rd gear from the flat side to the top of the coned side. The specification is 1.390-1.396 in. (35.30-35.47mm). If the reading is not within specification, replace the gear; if it is within specification, replace the synchro hub. 50. If the clearance between 4th gear and the spacer collar was not within specification, measure the length of the 4th gear half of the spacer collar. The specification is 1.024-1.027 in. (26.01-26.08mm). If the reading is not within specification, replace the spacer collar; if it is not within specification, measure the thickness of 4th gear from the flat side to the top of the coned side. The specification is 1.312-1.318 in. (33.33-33.47mm). If the reading is not within specification, replace the gear; if it is within specification, replace the synchro hub. 51. If the clearance between 5th gear and the spacer collar was not within specification, measure the length of the 5th gear half of the spacer collar. The specification is 1.024-1.027 in. (26.01-26.08mm). If the reading is not within specification, replace the spacer collar; if it is not within specification, measure the thickness of 5th gear from the flat side to the top of the coned side. The specification is 1.252-1.259 in. (31.80-31.97mm). If the reading is not within specification, replace the gear; if it is within specification, replace the synchro hub. 52. Measure the outer diameter of the ball bearing contact area in front of 1st gear. The specification is 1.100-1.102 in. (27.94-27.99mm). 53. Measure the outer diameter of the 3rd gear contact area. The specification is 1.493-1.496 in. (37.93-38.00mm). 54. Measure the outer diameter of the needle bearing contact area behind the 5th synchro hub splines. The specification is 1.100-1.102 in. (27.9427.99mm). 55. Inspect the mainshaft for run-out. The maximum allowable run-out is 0.0019 in. (0.05mm). Replace the mainshaft if any measurement is not within specifications. If the selective mainshaft shims located above the oil guide plate in the transaxle housing are to be changed, do not assemble the mainshaft until that procedure is completed. 56. Install the needle bearing and 3rd gear. 57. Install the first synchro ring, first spring, hub, second spring, second spring, second ring and 3/4 synchro sleeve. 58. Install 4th gear. 59. Install the first needle bearing, spacer collar and second needle bearing. 60. Install 5th gear. 61. Install the 5th synchro ring, spring, sleeve and hub. 62. Install the ball bearing. 63. If they have not already been removed, remove the thrust shim(s), and oil guide plate from the transaxle housing. 64. Install the 3/4 synchro hub, spacer collar, 5th synchro hub and ball bearing on the mainshaft. Make sure the clutch side ball bearing is not installed on the mainshaft. Install the assembly in the transaxle case. 65. Measure the distance between the end of the transaxle case and the top of mainshaft 1st gear. Make the measurement at 3 places, average the results and record the final answer. 66. Install the clutch housing side bearing (without the spring washer) into the mainshaft and install the clutch housing on the transaxle housing temporarily. Measure the distance between the end of the clutch housing and the bearing inner race. Make the measurement at 3 places, average the results and record the final answer. 67. To select the proper shim(s), add the 2 measurements and subtract 0.0366 in. (0.93mm). This is the size shim to use. Select a shim or combination of shims that fall within the range of the minimum and maximum answers to the formulas. Shims are available from 0.0472 in. (1.20mm) through 0.0933 in. (2.37mm) in 40 steps. Do not use more than 2 thrust shims. 68. Install the selected shim(s) in the transaxle case. 69. Install the spring washer on the mainshaft, concave side facing mainshaft 1st gear. 70. Install the mainshaft in the clutch housing. 71. Clean all dirt from the mating surfaces of the transaxle and clutch housings and install the transaxle housing to the clutch housing with several bolts spaced evenly around the housing. 72. Tap the mainshaft with a plastic hammer. 73. Install the collar and shaft holder of the mainshaft thrust clearance inspection tool 07GAJ-PG20101 to the mainshaft and tighten the 3 allen bolts into the groove below the splines. Make sure they are positioned correctly and not digging into the splines. 74. Position a dial indicator so the pin rests on the outer circumference of the tip of the mainshaft. 75. Turn the bolt clockwise and read the clearance. Do not turn the bolt more than 60 degrees after the needle of the dial indicator has stopped increasing. 76. The clearance specification is 0.0039-0.0063 in. (0.10-0.16mm). If the clearance is not within specifications, repeat the entire procedure. Do not continue until the correct clearance has been obtained. 77. When the correct clearance has been obtained, disassemble the transaxle and assemble the mainshaft completely. Before disassembling the countershaft assembly, perform the following measurements. If any measurement is not within specifications, disassemble the assembly and replace parts as required. If all measurements are within specifications, there is no reason to disassemble the countershaft assembly, providing there is no damage to any of its components. 78. Clamp the countershaft assembly in a vise using 2 pieces of wood to protect the shaft. 79. Torque the locknut to 80 ft. lbs. (110 Nm), loosen it, then retorque it to the 80 ft. lbs. (110 Nm). 80. Measure the clearance between 1st gear and the thrust washer. The specification is 0.002-0.007 in. (0.04-0.18mm). If not within specifications, disassemble the countershaft assembly and select the thrust washer that will bring the clearance within specifications. 81. Measure the clearance between 3rd gear and 2nd gear. The specification is 0.001-0.007 in. (0.03-0.18mm). If not within specifications, disassemble the countershaft assembly and select the spacer collar that will bring the clearance within specifications. 82. Remove the locknut and lock washer. 83. Remove the ball bearing. 84. Remove the first needle bearing, 5th, 4th, 3rd and 2nd gears and the second needle bearing. 85. Remove the first friction damper and spacer collar. 86. Remove the first synchro ring, first spring, reverse gear, second spring and second ring. 87. Remove the second friction damper. 88. Remove 1st gear, needle bearing and thrust washer. 89. Inspect the needle bearings for wear or damage. 90. Inspect the inside of the synchro rings for wear. 91. Install the hub in its mating sleeve and check for freedom of movement. If replacement is required, replace them as an assembly. 92. Inspect the synchro ring teeth and matching teeth on the gears for wear. 93. Inspect the gear hub thrust and cone surfaces for wear. 94. Inspect the teeth on all gears for uneven wear, scoring, galling or cracks. 95. Place the synchro ring on the matching gear cone and rotate it until it stops. The ring to gear clearance specification is 0.016-0.043 in. (0.401.10mm). Remove the ring from the gear. 96. Inspect the oil passages in the countershaft for clogging. 97. Measure the outer diameter of the needle bearing contact area. The specification is 1.297-1.300 in. (32.95-33.02mm). 98. Measure the outer diameter of the low gear contact area below the splines. The specification is 1.572-1.575 in. (39.93-40.00mm). 99. Measure the outer diameter of the ball bearing surface near the threaded end of the shaft. The specification is 0.982-0.984 in. (24.94-25.00mm). 100. Measure the run-out of the countershaft. The maximum allowable run-out is 0.0019 in. (0.05mm). Replace the countershaft if any measurement is not within specification. 101. Install the selected thrust washer, needle bearing and 1st gear. 102. Install the friction damper. 103. Install the first synchro ring, first spring, reverse gear, second spring and second ring. 104. Install the friction damper. 105. Install the needle bearing, 2nd, 3rd, 4th and 5th gears and the other needle bearing. 106. Install the ball bearing. 107. Install the lock washer and locknut. Torque the locknut to 80 ft. lbs. (110 Nm), loosen it, then retorque it to the 80 ft. lbs. (110 Nm). To assemble: 108. Position the shift rod guide and install the dust seal and boot. 109. Install the shift rod with the detents and holes facing up. Install the roll pin and clip that holds the change joint end. 110. Apply grease to the detent ball and spring and install. Torque the bolt to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). 111. Install the shift rod guide mounting bolt and washer. Torque the bolt to 22 ft. lbs. (30 Nm). 112. Install the differential assembly. 113. Install the mainshaft bearing and new seal and countershaft bearing in the clutch housing. 114. Install the spring washer to the bottom of the mainshaft and install the mainshaft, countershaft and shift forks together as as assembly. 115. Install the shift arm holder assembly. Torque the 6mm bolt to 7 ft. lbs. (12 Nm), the 8mm bolt to 21 ft. lbs. (28 Nm) and the special flange bolt to 11 ft. lbs. (15 Nm). 116. Measure the height of the protruding end of the shift shaft after mounting the shift arm holder. The height should be 0.44-0.46 in. (11.3-11.7mm). Do not proceed until this specification is met. 117. Install the reverse idler gear, washer and idler gear shaft in the clutch housing. Make sure the tab in the bottom of the shaft is aligned with the groove in the housing. 118. Install the reverse shift fork in the clutch housing. Make sure the pin is engaged with the slot in the fork. Torque the bolts to 11 ft. lbs. (15 Nm). 119. Install the oil guide plate and selected shim(s) into the transaxle housing. 120. Thoroughly clean and dry the mating surfaces of the transaxle and clutch housings. Apply sealant (Honda part number 08718-550000, or equivalent) to the clutch housing. 121. Install the transaxle housing to the clutch housing, being careful to line up the shafts. 122. Install the snapring to the countershaft ball bearing through the hole at the top of the transaxle housing. 123. Torque the bolts in the proper sequence to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm). 124. Install the 32mm bolt. 125. Install the reverse idler shaft bolt with new washer and torque to 40 ft. lbs. (55 Nm). Install the hook and torque the mounting bolt to 18 ft. lbs. (24 Nm). 126. Install the reverse light switch and neutral switch, if equipped. Replace the sealing washers when installing each switch. 127. Install the 9.5mm detent ball, spring, new washer and setting screw. Torque the setting screw to 24 ft. lbs. (33 Nm). 1991-93 LEGEND See Figures 63 through 71 Fig. Fig. 63: Remove the transaxle cover in the order shown-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 64: Check these diameters on the mainshaft-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 65: Check these diameters on the countershaft-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 66: Torque the bolts in this sequence to 37 ft. lbs. (50 Nm)-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 67: Install the bolts into the correct locations-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 68: Assemble 5th gear-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 69: Assemble the transaxle cover-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 70: Components of the transaxle-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 71: Components of the transaxle-1991-93 Legend 1. Remove the transaxle and drain the fluid. 2. Remove the transaxle cover to expose 5th gear. Remove 5th gear and the transaxle housing. Remove the bearings from the housing. 3. Disassemble the mainshaft. Inspect the mainshaft for bearing surface wear. The needle bearing surface A service diameter limit of 1.0996 in. (27.93mm). The needle bearing surface B service diameter limit of 1.4935 in. (37.935mm). The needle bearing surface C service diameter limit of 1.2181 in. (30.94mm). The ball bearing surface D service diameter limit of 1.0999 in. (27.937mm). Replace if any of the measurements are below these limits. 4. Disassemble the countershaft. Inspect the countershaft for bearing surface wear. The needle bearing surface A service diameter limit of 1.2972 in. (32.95mm). The ball bearing surface B service diameter limit of 1.2570 in. (31.928mm). The needle bearing surface C service diameter limit of 1.0999 in. (27.937mm). Replace if any of the measurements are below these limits. 5. Check the run-out of the mainshaft and countershaft. If the run-out exceeds the service limit of 0.0020 in. (0.05mm), replace the shaft. 6. Check the reverse shift holder lever clearance at the shaft and fork. If there is greater than 0.0315 in. (0.8mm) clearance, check the lever width. The lever width should be 0.504-0.512 in. (12.80-13.00mm). Replace the lever if worn and replace the shaft or fork. 7. Check the clearance between the shift forks and the synchro sleeve. The clearance should not exceed 0.3937 in. (1.0mm). If there is excessive clearance, check the width of the shift fork. The reverse fork fingers should be 0.252-0.260 in. (6.4-6.6mm). The shift fork fingers should be 0.29130.2992 in. (7.4-7.6mm). 8. Check the clearance of the oil pump rotors. The outer rotor clearance limit should be 0.0071 in. (0.18mm). The inner rotor clearance limit should be 0.008 in. (0.2mm). The rotor to housing clearance limit should be 0.0087 in. (0.22mm). 9. Assemble the mainshaft and countershaft and install in the clutch housing. Hold the mainshaft and shift the synchro sleeve into 1st gear. Tighten the locknut. 10. Measure the clearance between 3rd gear and the mainshaft. The service limit is 0.0118 in. (0.3mm). The service limit of 3rd gear width is 1.2331 in. (31.32mm). 11. Measure the clearance between 4th gear and the distance collar. The service limit is 0.0118 in. (0.3mm). The service limit of 3rd gear width is 1.1543 in. (29.32mm). 12. Measure the clearance between 5th gear and the distance collar. The service limit is 0.0118 in. (0.3mm). The service limit of 3rd gear width is 1.1543 in. (29.32mm). 13. Check the clearance between 1st gear and the 60mm thrust shim. The service clearance should be 0.0016-0.0047 in. (0.04-0.10mm). Correct with a shim, available from 0.0559 in. (1.42mm) to 0.0606 in. (1.54mm) in four steps. 14. Measure the distance between 2nd and 3rd gear. The service clearance should be 0.0016-0.0047 in. (0.04-0.10mm). Correct with a new spacer collar available in 2 widths, 1.4201-1.4209 in. (36.07-36.09mm) and 1.4185-1.4193 in. (36.03-36.05mm). To assemble: 15. Install the mainshaft, countershaft and the reverse gear shaft. Install the transaxle housing using liquid gasket on the mating surfaces. Torque the bolts in sequence. 16. Install the bearings. Check that the snaprings are seated in the grooves. 17. Install 5th gear. The thread on the countershaft is lefthand. 18. Install the transaxle cover using liquid gasket on the mating surfaces and thread sealant on the bolts. VIGOR See Figures 72 through 89 Fig. Fig. 72: Transaxle components-Vigor Fig. Fig. 73: Transaxle components-Vigor Fig. Fig. 74: Removal order of 5th gear-Vigor Fig. Fig. 75: Removal order of the transaxle housing-Vigor Fig. Fig. 76: Checking the clearance of the reverse shift holder-Vigor Fig. Fig. 77: Checking clearance between the reverse idler and holder-Vigor Fig. Fig. 78: Checking clearance between the select arm and change piece-Vigor Fig. Fig. 79: Checking clearance between the shift arm and change piece-Vigor Fig. Fig. 80: Checking clearance between the shift fork and the shift piece-Vigor Fig. Fig. 81: Disassembly of the mainshaft-Vigor Fig. Fig. 82: Check the mainshaft diameters at these locations-Vigor Fig. Fig. 83: Mainshaft assembly-Vigor Fig. Fig. 84: Disassemble the countershaft-Vigor Fig. Fig. 85: Check the countershaft diameters at these points-Vigor Fig. Fig. 86: Assemble the oil pump-Vigor Fig. Fig. 87: Use new washers when assembling-Vigor Fig. Fig. 88: Torque the housing bolts in this sequence to 21 ft. lbs. (28 Nm)-Vigor Fig. Fig. 89: Torque the cover bolts in this sequence to 21 ft. lbs. (28 Nm)-Vigor 1. Remove the transaxle from the vehicle. 2. Remove the transaxle cover, 5th gear and the housing cover. Loosen all bolts in a diagonal pattern to reduce warping. 3. Check the clearance between 5th/reverse shift piece pin and the reverse shift holder. The service limit for A is 0.02 in. (0.5mm) and the service limit for B is 0.04 in. (1.0mm). If the clearance is too great, check the L groove in the reverse shift holder. The service limit for the width of A is 0.278-0.285 in. (7.05-7.25mm) and the service limit for B is 0.29-0.30 in. (7.4-7.7mm). 4. Check the clearance between the reverse idler gear and the reverse shift holder. The service limit is 0.07 in. (1.7mm). If the clearance exceeds the service limit, check the width of the reverse shift holder groove. The service limit is 0.55-0.56 in. (14.0-14.3mm). 5. Check the clearance between the change piece and the select arm. The service limit is 0.02 in. (0.5mm). If the clearance exceeds this limit, check the width of the select arm. The select arm service width is 0.46-0.47 in. (11.8-12.0mm). 6. Check the clearance between the change piece and the shift arm. The service limit is 0.02 in. (0.5mm). If the clearance exceeds this limit, check the width of the select arm. The select arm service width is 0.50-0.51 in. (12.8-13.0mm). 7. Check the clearance between the shift piece and the shift forks. Also check the clearance between the 5th/reverse shift piece and the shift piece. The service limit is 0.03 in. (0.7mm). If the clearance exceeds this limit, check the width of the select arm. The select arm service width is 0.4690.472 in. (11.9-12.0mm). 8. Check the clearance between the shift piece and the shift arm. The service limit is 0.02 in. (0.6mm). If the clearance exceeds this limit, replace the change holder. 9. Disassemble the mainshaft and countershaft from the housing. 10. Disassemble the mainshaft. Inspect the mainshaft for bearing surface wear. The needle bearing surface A service diameter limit of 1.0996 in. (27.93mm). The needle bearing surface B service diameter limit of 1.4146 in. (35.930mm). The ball bearing surface C service diameter limit of 1.1394 in. (28.940mm). Replace if any of the measurements are below these limits. 11. Disassemble the countershaft. Inspect the countershaft for bearing surface wear. The needle bearing surface A service diameter limit of 1.2972 in. (32.95mm). The needle bearing surface B service diameter limit of 1.7295 in. (43.930mm). The needle bearing surface C service diameter limit of 1.0996 in. (27.930mm). The ball bearing surface C service diameter limit of 0.9815 in. (24.930mm). Replace if any of the measurements are below these limits. 12. Check the run-out of the mainshaft and countershaft. If the run-out exceeds the service limit of 0.0020 in. (0.05mm), replace the shaft. Assemble the mainshaft and countershaft. 13. Measure the clearance between 3rd gear and the mainshaft. The service limit is 0.0118 in. (0.3mm). The service limit of 3rd gear width is 1.097 in. (27.85mm). 14. Measure the clearance between 4th gear and the distance collar. The service limit is 0.0118 in. (0.3mm). The service limit of 3rd gear width is 1.372 in. (34.85mm). 15. Measure the clearance between 5th gear and the distance collar. The service limit is 0.0118 in. (0.3mm). The service limit of 3rd gear width is 1.234 in. (31.35mm). 16. Check the clearance between 1st gear and the 60mm thrust shim. The service clearance should be 0.002-0.004 in. (0.05-0.11mm). Correct with a shim, available from 0.0768 in. (1.95mm) to 0.0835 in. (2.12mm) in 6 steps. 17. Measure the distance between 2nd and 3rd gear. The service clearance should be 0.01 in. (0.30mm). If the clearance exceeds this limit, check the width of 2nd gear. The service width is 1.333 in. (33.85mm). To assemble: 18. Replace the bearings in the clutch housing. Stake the screws to lock. Replace the oil seals. 19. Check the clearance of the oil pump rotors. The outer rotor clearance limit should be 0.009 in. (0.22mm). The inner rotor clearance limit should be 0.008 in. (0.2mm). The rotor to housing clearance limit should be 0.008 in. (0.20mm). 20. Check the width of the shift fork fingers. The width should be 0.29-0.30 in. (7.4-7.6mm) 21. Assemble the mainshaft and countershaft assemblies in the clutch housing. Install the transaxle housing to the clutch housing and torque the bolts in order to 21 ft. lbs. (28 Nm). Use liquid gasket on the mating surfaces. 22. Install new bearings in the transaxle housing. Install 5th gear and torque the mainshaft locknut to 108 ft. lbs. (150 Nm) and the countershaft locknut to 94 ft. lbs. (130 Nm). Stake the locknuts. 23. Install the transaxle cover. Use liquid gasket at the mating surfaces and torque the bolts in sequence to 21 ft. lbs. (28 Nm). Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Transaxle REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print 1986-89 Integra See Figures 1, 2, 3and 4 Fig. Fig. 1: Remove the front engine stiffener-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 2: Remove the Rear engine mount bracket-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 3: Remove the engine torque bracket-1986-89 Integra Fig. Fig. 4: Remove the transaxle mounting bolts-1986-89 Integra 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable from the battery and the transaxle. 2. Unlock the steering and make sure the transaxle is out of gear. 3. Raise and safely support the vehicle and remove the front wheels. 4. Disconnect all the wiring from the starter and the transaxle. 5. Unclip and remove the speedometer cable at the transaxle; do not disassemble the speedometer gear holder. 6. Disconnect the clutch cable from the release arm. 7. Remove the side and top starter mounting bolts. 8. Drain the transaxle oil. 9. Remove the splash shields from the underside. 10. Remove the stabilizer bar. 11. Disconnect the left and right lower ball joints and tie rods ends, using a ball joint remover. Use caution when removing the ball joints. Place a suitable floor jack under the lower control arm securely at the ball joint. Otherwise, the lower control arm may jump suddenly away from the steering knuckle as the ball joint is removed. 12. Turn the right steering knuckle out as far as it will go. Place a small prybar against the inboard CV-joint and carefully pry the right halfshaft out of the transaxle about 13mm. This will force the spring clip out of the groove inside the differential gear splines. Pull it out the rest of the way. Repeat this procedure on the other side. 13. Attach a suitable chain hoist to the engine and lift the engine slightly to take the weight off the mounts. 14. Disconnect the header pipe at the exhaust manifold. 15. Disconnect the shift lever torque rod. To disconnect the shift linkage forward of the universal joint, slide the pin retainer out of the way and drive out the roll pin. 16. Raise a transaxle jack securely against the transaxle to take up the weight. 17. Remove the bolts from the front transaxle mount at the front engine stiffener. 18. Remove the intake manifold bracket and the rear engine mount bracket. 19. Remove the transaxle housing bolts from the engine torque bracket. 20. Remove the remaining starter mounting bolts and take out the starter. 21. Remove the remaining transaxle mounting bolts. 22. Pull the transaxle away from the engine until it clears the 14mm dowel pins, then lower on the transaxle jack. 23. Separate the mainshaft from the clutch pressure plate and remove the transaxle by lowering the jack. To install: 24. Install the transaxle on a transaxle jack. Clean and lubricate the clutch release bearing surfaces. 25. Make sure both 14mm dowel pins are installed in the clutch housing. 26. Raise the transaxle high enough to align the dowel pins with the matching holes in the block. 27. Roll the transaxle toward the engine and fit the mainshaft into the clutch disc splines. If the driver's side suspension was left in place, install new spring clips on both axles and carefully insert the left axle into the differential when installing the transaxle. Install new 26mm spring clips on both axles. Make sure the axles fully bottom out. Slide the axle in until the spring clip engages the differential. 28. Push and wiggle the transaxle until it fits flush with the flange. 29. Bolt the transaxle to the engine with the mounting bolts from the engine side. Torque the bolts to 50 ft. lbs. (68 Nm). 30. Install the rear mount bracket on the transaxle housing. Torque the mounting bolts to 47 ft. lbs. (65 Nm). 31. Install the engine torque bracket on the transaxle housing. Torque the mounting bolts to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm). 32. Loosely install the bolts for the front of the transaxle mount, then torque them to specifications. 33. Install the starter mounting bolts and torque them to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm). 34. Install the intermediate shaft, the right and left halfshaft. 35. Turn the right steering knuckle/axle assembly outward far enough to insert the free end of the axle into the transaxle. Repeat this procedure on the other side. Make sure the axles fully bottom out. Slide the axle in until the spring clip engages the differential. 36. Reconnect the shift rod and the shift lever torque rod. 37. Reconnect the lower arm to the ball joints and torque them to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm). 38. Reconnect the tie rod end ball joints and torque them to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm). 39. Install the engine and wheel well splash shields. 40. Reconnect the exhaust header pipe. 41. Install the front wheels, lower the vehicle to the ground and tighten the lug nuts to 80 ft. lbs. (110 Nm). 42. Remove the chain hoist from the engine. 43. Install the speedometer cable. 44. Install the transaxle housing bolts and torque them to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm). 45. Connect the clutch cable to the release arm, then attach the cable housing end to the transaxle bracket. 46. Connect the wiring. 47. With the ignition key turned OFF , connect the ground cable to the battery and the transaxle. 48. Refill the transaxle with the correct oil and adjust the clutch free-play. 49. Check the transaxle for smooth operation. 1990-93 Integra See Figures 5, 6 and 7 Fig. Fig. 5: Transaxle installation-1990-93 Integra Fig. Fig. 6: Installing the halfshafts-1990-93 Integra Fig. Fig. 7: Removing the transaxle-1990-93 Integra 1. Disconnect the negative first and then the positive battery cables. 2. Remove the 4 battery mounting bolts and remove the battery. 3. Remove the air cleaner case complete with air intake tube. Disconnect the transaxle ground cable. 4. Loosen the clutch cable adjusting nut and disconnect the clutch cable at the release arm, then disconnect from the clutch cable bracket. 5. Disconnect the electrical connectors for the back-up light switch, oxygen sensor and the starter motor cables and wire harness clamp from the starter. 6. Remove the power steering speed sensor without disconnecting the sensor hose. 7. Disconnect the distributor connectors and remove the distributor mounting bolts. Before removing the distributor, be sure to make some alignment marks on the distributor housing and engine to aid in the installation procedure. 8. Raise and safely support the vehicle. Remove the starter. 9. Drain the transaxle oil into a suitable container. 10. Remove the right front splash shield and splash guard. Remove the center beam bolts and remove the center beam. 11. Remove the cotter pin from the lower right ball joint castle nut, remove the nut and using a ball joint separator, remove the ball joint from the lower arm. 12. Remove the right damper fork. Remove the right radius rod locknut, then the bolts and remove the right radius arm. 13. Remove the right halfshaft assembly. 14. Remove the cotter pin from the lower left ball joint castle nut, remove the nut and using a ball joint separator, remove the ball joint from the lower arm. 15. Remove the left halfshaft from the intermediate shaft. Remove the intermediate shaft bolts and remove the intermediate shaft. 16. Remove the shift rod and shift lever torque rod. 17. Remove the front engine stiffener and the rear engine stiffener. Remove the 4 bolts from the clutch housing cover and remove the cover. 18. Remove the 2 transaxle mount bolts from the engine side. 19. Remove the 2 transaxle mount bolts from the rear engine mount bracket. 20. Remove the side transaxle mount bolt from the underside. Remove the front transaxle mount bolts and mount. 21. Install the bolts into the cylinder head and attach a suitable lifting device or chain hoist to the bolts. Lift the engine slightly to take the load off of the engine mounts. 22. Place a suitable transaxle jack under the transaxle and raise it enough to take the weight off of the transaxle mounts. Remove the bolts and nuts that attach the brackets to the side transaxle mounts. 23. Remove the 3 transaxle mount bolts from the transaxle side. 24. Pull the transaxle away from the clutch pressure plate until it clears the mainshaft, then remove the transaxle by lowering the jack. To install: 25. Install the transaxle on a transaxle jack. Clean and lubricate the clutch release bearing surfaces. 26. Make sure both 14mm dowel pins are installed in the clutch housing. 27. Loosely install the transaxle mount bolts, then torque them to 49 ft. lbs. (68 Nm). 28. Secure the transaxle to the engine with the engine side mounting bolt and torque it to 50 ft. lbs. (68 Nm). 29. Install the transaxle to side transaxle mount. Install the transaxle to the front transaxle mount. 30. Install the transaxle to the rear engine mount bracket. 31. Loosely install the bolt in the front stiffener and then torque then to 17 ft. lbs. (24 Nm). 32. Loosely install the bolt in the rear stiffener and then torque then to 17 ft. lbs. (24 Nm). 33. Remove the transaxle jack. Remove the lifting device by removing the hoist bolts from the cylinder head. 34. Reconnect the shift linkage and torque rod. 35. Install the intermediate shaft. 36. Install the left halfshaft, then the left ball joint and lower arm. 37. Install the right halfshaft assembly. Be sure to turn the right steering knuckle fully outward and slide the axle into the differential until the spring clip engages the side gear. 38. Install the right radius arm, damper fork bolt and the right ball joint to the lower arm. 39. Install the center beam. Install the right front splash guard and splash shield. 40. Install the starter motor. Install the distributor, be sure to use the alignment marks made earlier in the removal procedure. 41. Connect the starter motor cables and wire harness clamp. Install the power steering speed sensor. 42. Connect the oxygen sensor connector, back-up light connector and connect the clutch cable to the clutch cable bracket, then connect to the release arm. 43. Connect the transaxle ground. Install the air cleaner case complete with the air intake tube. 44. Install the battery base. Refill the transaxle with the recommended oil. 45. Install the battery and connect the battery cables. 46. Adjust the clutch free-play. Check the ignition timing and road test the vehicle to be sure the transaxle is operating properly. 1986-90 Legend See Figures 8 through 13 Fig. Fig. 8: Disconnect the intermediate shaft-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 9: Remove the torque rod bracket-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 10: Remove the clutch cover and the center stopper bracket-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 11: Remove the rear engine mount-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 12: Remove the front engine mount-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 13: Remove the transaxle bolts-1986-90 Legend 1. Disconnect the both battery cables from the battery. 2. Disconnect the starter and ground cables. 3. Disconnect the back-up light wires from the engine harness. 4. Loosen the 6mm bolt attaching the harness holder at the side of the transaxle hanger and the release harness from the transaxle. 5. Loosen the 6mm bolts at the side of the battery base and the intake hose band. 6. Remove the air cleaner case assembly along with the intake hose. 7. Remove the 8mm bolts and the clutch slave cylinder with the clutch hose and the pushrod. Do not operate the clutch pedal once the slave cylinder has been removed. 8. Remove the 8mm bolts and clutch damper assembly from the transaxle hanger bracket. 9. Remove the power steering speed sensor without disconnecting the hose. 10. Drain the oil from the transaxle. 11. Remove the halfshafts from the vehicle. 12. Remove the bolts securing the intermediate shaft and remove the shaft. 13. Remove the shift rod and the shift extension. 14. Remove the bolts attaching the torque rod bracket to the clutch case. Replace the torque rod bolts whenever loosened or removed. 15. Place a transaxle jack securely beneath the transaxle. 16. Remove the sub frame center beam. 17. Attach a support chain with two 10mm bolts to the engine block, 1 on each bank. Lift the engine slightly to take the weight off the mounts. 18. Remove the center stop bracket from the transaxle. 19. Remove the flywheel cover. On vehicles with automatic transaxle, unbolt the torque converter from the flywheel. 20. Remove both rear engine mounting bolts from the transaxle. 21. Remove both front engine mounting bolts from the transaxle housing. 22. Remove the starter mounting bolts and the starter assembly. 23. Remove the remaining transaxle mounting bolts. 24. Pull the transaxle away from the engine until it clears the 14mm dowel pins and lower on the transaxle jack. To install: 25. Install the transaxle on a transaxle jack; clean and lubricate the clutch release bearing surfaces. 26. Make sure both 14mm dowel pins are installed in the clutch housing. 27. Raise the transaxle high enough to align the dowel pins with the matching holes in the block. 28. Roll the transaxle toward the engine and fit the mainshaft into the clutch disc splines. 29. Install the transaxle mounting bolts and torque to 55 ft. lbs. (75 Nm). 30. Install the starter and torque the mounting bolts. 31. Install the front engine mounting bolts and torque to 29 ft. lbs. (40 Nm). 32. Install the rear engine mounting bolts and torque to 29 ft. lbs. (40 Nm). 33. Install the center stopper bracket bolts and torque to 29 ft. lbs. (40 Nm). 34. Install the flywheel cover. 35. Install the center beam and remove the transaxle jack. 36. Install and torque the new torque rod bracket bolts to 29 ft. lbs. (40 Nm). Replace the torque rod bolts whenever loosened or removed. 37. Remove the engine support chain. 38. Connect the shift linkage or cable. 39. Install the intermediate shaft with the 8mm bolts. Torque the bolts to 29 ft. lbs. (40 Nm). 40. Install the right and left halfshaft. 41. Install the speed sensor. 42. Install the clutch slave cylinder with the 8mm bolts complete with the hose and pushrod. Torque the bolts to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm) and adjust. 43. Install the clutch damper assembly and the 8mm bolts to the transaxle hanger bracket. Torque the bolts to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). 44. Install the air cleaner assembly and the air intake hose. 45. Install and torque both 6mm bolts at the side of the battery case and tighten the intake hose band. 46. Tighten the 6mm harness holder bolt at the side of the transaxle hanger. 47. Connect the back-up light switch wire to the engine harness. 48. Connect the starter and ground cables. 49. Connect the both battery cables. 50. Refill the transaxle with the proper fluid. 51. Check the transaxle for smooth operation. 1991-93 Legend See Figures 14 through 32 Fig. Fig. 14: Remove the transmission housing bolts-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 15: Remove the exhaust pipes-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 16: Remove the connecting parts-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 17: Remove the steering box bolts and lower plate-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 18: Remove the transaxle mount-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 19: Remove the extension shaft with tool 07LAC-PW50100 or equivalent-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 20: Remove the clutch release fork-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 21: Remove the mounting bolts-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 22: Remove the engine stiffener and clutch housing cover-1991-93 Legend 1. Disconnect both battery cables. Remove the strut bar and drain the transaxle fluid. Remove the control box, but do not disconnect the vacuum lines. 2. Disconnect the switches. Remove the transaxle housing bolts and the clutch hose bracket at the rear engine hanger. 3. Remove the exhaust pipes and the heat shield with brackets. 4. Remove the shift and torque rods. Disconnect the oil cooler lines at the oil pump pipes. Remove the boot and clutch slave cylinder. 5. Remove the lower plate and reinstall the steering box bolts. Remove the exhaust pipe stay and the transmission bracket with mount. 6. Remove the secondary cover and the 36mm sealing bolt. Shift into 2nd gear to lock the transmission to do this. Use tool 07LAC-PW50100 or equivalent to disconnect the extension shaft from the differential. 7. Support the transaxle with jack and remove the mounts. Remove the clutch fork and the transaxle housing mounting bolts. 8. Remove the engine stiffener and the clutch housing cover. 9. Remove the transaxle mounting bolts and the 26mm shim under the transaxle. Slide the transaxle back and off the input shaft. To install: 10. Check the transaxle mounting dowel pins are intact in the clutch housing. Fig. Fig. 23: Check the dowel pins-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 24: Install the bolts-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 25: Install the mounts-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 26: Install the extension shaft-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 27: Install the sealing bolt and secondary cover-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 28: Install the transmission bracket and mount-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 29: Install the lower plate after removing the steering box bolts-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 30: Install the components-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 31: Install the exhaust-1991-93 Legend Fig. Fig. 32: Install the transmission mounting bolts-1991-93 Legend 11. Clean and lightly lubricate the release fork contact points with molybdenum grease and install the fork. 12. Install the dowel pins and set the extension shaft in place. Use a new set ring on the shaft and lightly lubricate the splines with molybdenum grease. 13. Install the transmission and start all of the bolts. Don't forget the transmission-to-differential shim. Torque the 12mm bolts to 54 ft. lbs. (75 Nm). 14. Install all of the engine stiffener 8mm bolts, then torque to 16 ft. lbs. (22 Nm). 15. Install the mounts and brackets. Torque the 10mm bolts to 29 ft. lbs. (39 Nm), 10mm nuts to 36 ft. lbs. (49 Nm), and any remaining 12mm bolts to 54 ft. lbs. (75 Nm). 16. With the transmission in gear, install the extension shaft using the special tool. Make sure the shaft snaps into place on the set ring. 17. Pack the shaft area with molybdenum grease, but keep the thread area clean. Apply liquid gasket to the sealing bolt threads and install the bolt and cover. 18. Install the lower plate and torque the bolts to 28 ft. lbs. (39 Nm). These bolts thread into aluminum and must have the special Dacro® coating to avoid corrosion. 19. Install the slave cylinder and connect the shift linkage and torque rod. Connect the oil cooler hoses, if equipped. 20. Install the heat shield and the exhaust pipe and catalytic converter. Use new locking nuts and gaskets. Torque the exhaust flange nuts to 40 ft. lbs. (55 Nm) and the catalyst flange nuts to 26 ft. lbs. (34 Nm). 21. Install the emission control equipment box and the strut bar. 22. Connect all the wiring and the battery cables and refill the transmission oil. Vigor See Figures 33 through 53 Fig. Fig. 33: Remove the control box, but do not disconnect the vacuum hoses-Vigor Fig. Fig. 34: Remove the slave cylinder, 26mm shim and transaxle housing bolts-Vigor Fig. Fig. 35: Remove the mount-Vigor Fig. Fig. 36: Remove the secondary cover and the 33mm sealing bolt-Vigor Fig. Fig. 37: Remove the extension shaft-Vigor Fig. Fig. 38: Remove the exhaust-Vigor Fig. Fig. 39: Disconnect the shifter-Vigor Fig. Fig. 40: Remove the transaxle mounts-Vigor Fig. Fig. 41: Remove the clutch housing-Vigor Fig. Fig. 42: Shifter components-Vigor 1. Disconnect both battery cables. Remove the battery and the battery tray. 2. Remove the ABS relay box, but do not disconnect the harness. Remove the heat shield, distributor and the control box. Do not disconnect the vacuum lines from the control box. 3. Disconnect the transaxle ground wire and the back-up light switch connector. Remove the clutch slave cylinder and the transaxle housing mounting bolts with the 26mm shim. 4. Remove the mount beam and bracket. Remove the secondary cover and the 33mm sealing bolt. Pull the extension shaft out using a puller that threads into the shaft bore. 5. Remove the exhaust and disconnect the shift and extension rods. Remove the transaxle mount nuts and support the housing with a jack. Remove the mounts and the housing bolt. 6. Remove the clutch cover and the housing bolt. Remove the transaxle. To install: Fig. Fig. 43: Check the casing dowel pins before installation-Vigor Fig. Fig. 44: Fit the shift fork onto the release bearing-Vigor Fig. Fig. 45: Replace the clutch cover and bolts-Vigor Fig. Fig. 46: Replace the mounts and bolts-Vigor Fig. Fig. 47: Lubricate the splines and install the ring-Vigor Fig. Fig. 48: Add grease and install the sealing bolt with thread sealer-Vigor Fig. Fig. 49: Connect the shifter-Vigor Fig. Fig. 50: Install the exhaust system-Vigor Fig. Fig. 51: Install the mount-Vigor Fig. Fig. 52: Install the housing bolts-Vigor Fig. Fig. 53: Install the control box and connector-Vigor 7. Lubricate the release bearing, fork and guide with molybdenum grease and make sure the dowel pins are properly placed in the clutch housing. 8. While fitting the transmission to the engine, turn the release lever up and make sure the fork engages the release bearing on the clutch. 9. Make sure the transmission is properly fitted and install the lower transmission-to-engine bolts. Torque the bolts to 55 ft. lbs. (75 Nm). 10. If the transmission or differential is being replace, measure the gap between them with a feeler gauge and select the correct 26mm shim. 11. Install the front transmission mounts. 12. Install a new set ring onto the extension shaft and lubricate the shaft with a high temperature molybdenum grease. Install the extension shaft. 13. Pack the shaft area with grease but keep the threads clean. Apply a liquid gasket compound to the threads and install the 33mm sealing bolt. Torque the bolt to 58 ft. lbs. (80 Nm) and install the secondary cover. 14. Connect the shift linkage and the extension rod. 15. Use new gaskets and install the exhaust pipe. 16. Install the rear transmission mount and bracket. 17. Install the 26mm shim and the remaining transmission-to-engine bolts. Torque the shim bolt to 55 ft. lbs. (75 Nm) and the rest to 47 ft. lbs. (65 Nm). 18. Install the remaining components and check the fluid level in the transmission before running the engine. Back to Top Suspension & Steering Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Ball Joints INSPECTION Print Check ball joint play as follows: 1. Raise and safely support the vehicle. 2. Clamp a dial indicator onto the lower control arm and place the indicator tip on the knuckle, near the ball joint. 3. Place a prybar between the lower control arm and the knuckle. Replace the lower control arm if the play exceeds 0.5 mm. REMOVAL & INSTALLATION 1986-89 Integra The Integra is equipped with only a lower ball joint. If the lower ball joint play exceeds 0.05mm, replace the lower ball joint and radius arm as an assembly. Legend, Vigor & 1990-93 Integra See Figures 1, 2 and 3 Fig. Fig. 1: Removing the ball joint from the steering knuckle Fig. Fig. 2: Installing the ball joint into the steering knuckle Fig. Fig. 3: Using a guide to install the set ring to prevent damage to the boot This procedure is performed after the removal of the steering knuckle and requires the use of the following special tools or their equivalent: tool number 07GAF-SD40330 ball joint removal base, 07GAF-SD40320 ball joint installation base and 07GAG-SD40700 clip guide tool. 1. Raise and support the vehicle safely. Remove the front wheel assemblies. Remove the steering knuckle. 2. Remove the boot by prying off the snapring. Remove the 40mm clip. 3. Install the special ball joint removal/installation tool 07965-SB00100 or equivalent, on the ball joint and tighten the ball joint nut. 4. Position the ball joint in this special tool and set this assembly in a vise. Press the ball joint out of the steering knuckle. To install: 5. Place the ball joint in position by hand. Install the ball joint into the special tool and press in the new ball joint in the vise. 6. Install the 40mm circlip. Adjust the special tool with he adjusting bolt until the end of the tool aligns with the groove on the boot. Slide the clip over the tool and into position. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Coil Springs REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print 1. Remove the damper unit and make a note of the spring seat and bracket positions for reassembly. 2. Install the damper into a spring compressor and tighten the compressor according to manufacturer's instructions. 3. Remove the locking nut from the top of the shock absorber and disassemble the damper and spring as required. 4. Installation is the reverse of removal. Be sure to properly position the spring seat and brackets. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide FRONT SUSPENSION The 1986-89 Integra uses a torsion bar type front suspension. A torsion bar differs from the more traditional coil spring in that instead of have a helical spiral to the spring element that compresses, the torsion bar is a straight element. The straight bar is anchored at one end and has a lower arm attached to the other. The lower arm is connected to the lower control arm and as the suspension moves up and down, the lower arm twists the torsion bar. In fact, a coil spring is nothing more than a torsion bar that has been twisted into a coil shape. Print The upper portion of the suspension is located by a damper unit similar to a MacPherson strut, but minus the coil spring. The lower portion of the suspension is a sickle shaped control arm that the torsion bar lower arm attaches to. The stabilizer bar also attaches to the lower control arm. The lower control arm is also known as the radius arm. The Legend, Vigor and 1990-93 Integra use a sophisticated racing style suspension called a double wishbone. Lower and upper control arms shaped like wishbones support the steering knuckle. The steering knuckle holds the bearing and hub assembly. A standard spring seat shock with a split lower end to allow the drive axle to pass through is utilized along with a coil spring. Unlike a MacPherson strut, the shock and spring do not rotate with the steering input. The use of a double wishbone system allows for a reduced hood height for styling and aerodynamics, plus better control of the suspension geometry. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Front Wheel Alignment See Figure 1 Print Alignment of the front wheels is essential if your car is to go, stop and turn as designed. Alignment can be altered by collision, overloading, poor repair or bent components. If you are diagnosing bizarre handling and/or poor road manners, the first place to look is the tires. Although the tires may wear as a result of an alignment problem, worn or poorly inflated tires can make you chase alignment problems which don't exist. Once you have eliminated all other causes, unload everything from the trunk except the spare tire, set the tire pressures to the correct level and take the car to a reputable alignment facility. Since the alignment settings are measured in very small increments, it is almost impossible for the home mechanic to accurately determine the settings. The explanations that follow will help you understand the three dimensions of alignment: caster, camber and toe. Fig. Fig. 1: Camber, caster and toe-in CASTER Caster is the tilting of the steering axis either forward or backward from the vertical, when viewed from the side of the vehicle. A backward tilt is said to be positive and a forward tilt is said to be negative. Changes in caster affect the straight line tendency of the vehicle and the "return to center" of the steering after a turn. If the camber is radically different between the left and right wheels (such as after hitting a major pothole), the car will exhibit a nasty pull to one side. CAMBER Camber is the tilting of the wheels from the vertical (leaning in or out) when viewed from the front of the vehicle. When the wheels tilt outward at the top, the camber is said to be positive. When the wheels tilt inward at the top the camber is said to be negative. The amount of tilt is measured in degrees from the vertical. This measurement is called camber angle. Camber affects the position of the tire on the road surface during vertical suspension movement and cornering. Changes in camber affect the handling and ride qualities of the car as well as tire wear. Many tire wear patterns indicate camber-related problems from misalignment, overloading or poor driving habits. TOE Toe is the turning in or out (parallelism) of the wheels. The actual amount of toe setting is normally only a fraction of an inch. The purpose of toe-in (or out) specification is to ensure parallel rolling of the wheels. Toe-in also serves to offset the small deflections of the steering support system which occur when the vehicle is rolling forward. Changing the toe setting will radically affect the overall "feel" of the steering, the behavior of the car under braking, tire wear and even fuel economy. Excessive toe (in or out) causes excessive drag or scrubbing on the tires. Toe is adjustable on all Hondas. It is generally measured in decimal inches or degrees. It is adjusted by loosening the locknut on each tie-rod end and turning the rod until the correct reading is achieved. The rods, left and right, must remain equal in length during all adjustments. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Front Wheel Hub,Knuckle and Bearings REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print The following procedures for hub and wheel bearing removal and installation necessitate the use of many special tools and a hydraulic press. Do not attempt this procedure without these special tools. 1986-89 Integra 1. Pry the lock tab away from the spindle and loosen the nut. Slightly loosen the lug nuts. 2. Raise and safely support the vehicle. Remove the front wheel and spindle nut. 3. Remove the brake caliper bolts and the caliper from the knuckle. Do not allow the caliper to hang by the brake hose, support it with a length of wire. 4. Remove the disc brake rotor retaining screws, if equipped. Screw two 8 × 1.25 12mm bolts into the disc brake removal holes and turn the bolts to press the rotor from the hub. Only turn each bolt 2 turns at a time to prevent cocking the disc excessively. 5. Remove the tie rod from the knuckle using a tie rod end removal tool. Use care not to damage the ball joint seals or threads. 6. Use a floor jack to support the lower control arm, then remove the cotter pin and the castle nut from the lower arm ball joint. Be sure to place the jack securely beneath the lower control arm at the ball joint. Otherwise, the tension from the torsion bar may cause the arm to suddenly jump away from the steering knuckle as the ball joint is removed. 7. Remove the lower arm from the knuckle using the ball joint removal tool. 8. Loosen the pinch bolt which retains the shock in the knuckle. Tap the top of the knuckle with a hammer and slide it off the shock. 9. Remove the knuckle and hub, if still attached, by sliding the assembly off of the halfshaft. 10. Remove the hub from the knuckle, hydraulic press and the proper rams. 11. Remove the splash guard and the snapring. 12. Press the bearing outer race out of the knuckle using a hydraulic press and the proper rams. 13. Remove the outboard bearing inner race from the hub using a bearing puller. Whenever the wheel bearings are removed, always replace them with a new set of bearings and an outer dust seal. 14. Clean all old grease from the halfshaft and spindles on the vehicle. 15. Remove the old grease from the hub and knuckle and thoroughly dry and wipe clean all components. To install: 16. When installing a new bearing into the knuckle, be sure to press only on the outer race or the bearing will be destroyed. Properly support the knuckle. 17. Install the snapring and the splash guard. 18. Support the hub properly and press on the inner race of the bearing to install the knuckle onto the hub. Do not press on the outer race or on the knuckle or the bearing will be destroyed. 19. The remaining installation is the reverse of the removal procedure. Torque the ball joint and tie rod end nuts to 29 ft. lbs. (40 Nm) and install new cotter pins. Torque the pinch bolt to 47 ft. lbs. (65 Nm). 20. With the vehicle on its wheels, torque the spindle nut to 134 ft. lbs. (185 Nm). Use a new spindle nut and stake it after torquing. CAUTION Spindle nut torque is very high. Tighten or loosen the spindle nut only with the vehicle on the ground. Attempting to loosen or torque the spindle nut while the vehicle is on jack stands or a lift may cause the vehicle to fall. 1990-93 Integra See Figure 1 1. Pry the lock tab away and loosen the spindle nut. Slightly loosen the lug nuts. 2. Raise and safely support the vehicle. Remove the front wheel and spindle nut. 3. Remove the brake caliper bolts and the caliper from the knuckle. Do not allow the caliper to hang by the brake hose, support it with a length of wire. 4. Remove the disc brake rotor retaining screws, if equipped. Screw two 8 × 1.0 12mm bolts into the disc brake removal holes and turn the bolts to press the rotor from the hub. Only turn each bolt 2 turns at a time to prevent cocking the disc excessively. 5. Remove the cotter pin from the tie rod end and remove the castle nut. Break loose the tie rod ball joint using a suitable ball joint removal tool and lift the tie rod out the steering knuckle. Fig. Fig. 1: Exploded view of the front wheel bearing and hub assembly-1990-93 Integra 6. Remove the cotter pin and loosen the lower arm ball joint nut half the length of the joint threads. Separate the ball joint and lower arm using a puller with the pawls applied to the lower arm. Avoid damaging the ball joint thread. If necessary, apply a suitable penetrating type lubricant to loosen the ball joint. 7. Remove the knuckle protector. Remove the cotter pin and remove the upper ball pin nut. Separate the upper ball joint and the knuckle using a suitable ball joint removal tool. 8. Remove the steering knuckle and hub by sliding them off of the halfshaft. 9. Remove the splash guard screws from the knuckle. Separate the hub from the knuckle using a suitable hydraulic press. Be careful not to distort the splash guard. Hold onto the hub to keep it from falling when pressed clear. To prevent damage to the tool make sure the threads are fully engaged before pressing. Always replace the bearing with a new one after removal. 10. Remove the snapring and knuckle ring from the knuckle. Press the wheel bearing out of the knuckle using suitable press tools and a hydraulic press. 11. Remove the outboard bearing inner race from the hub by using a suitable bearing puller. To install: 12. Remove the old grease from the hub and knuckle and thoroughly dry and wipe clean all components. When pressing a new bearing into the hub, be sure to press only on the outer race or the bearing will be destroyed. Install the snapring securely in the knuckle groove. 13. Install the splash guard and tighten the screws. 14. Support the hub properly and press on the inner race of the bearing to install the knuckle onto the hub. Do not press on the outer race or on the knuckle or the bearing will be destroyed. Install the front knuckle ring. 15. The remaining installation is the reverse of the removal procedure. Torque the upper ball joint and tie rod end nuts to 32 ft. lbs. (44 Nm). Torque the lower ball joint nut to 40 ft. lbs. (55 Nm). Install new cotter pins. 16. With the vehicle on its wheels, torque the spindle nut to 134 ft. lbs. (185 Nm). Use a new spindle nut and stake it after torquing. Legend See Figures 2 and 3 1. Pry the lock tab away from the spindle and loosen the 36mm nut. Slightly loosen the lug nuts. 2. Raise and safely support the vehicle. Remove the front wheel and spindle nut. 3. Remove the bolts retaining the brake caliper and the caliper from the knuckle. Do not allow the caliper to hang by the brake hose, support it with a length of wire. 4. Remove the disc brake rotor retaining screws if equipped. Screw both 8 × 1.25 × 12mm bolts into the disc brake removal holes and turn the bolts to press the rotor from the hub. Only turn each bolt 2 turns at a time to prevent cocking the disc excessively. Fig. Fig. 2: Exploded view of the front wheel bearing and hub assembly-1986-90 Legend Fig. Fig. 3: Exploded view of the front wheel bearing and hub assembly-1991-93 Legend 5. Remove the tie rod from the knuckle using a tie rod end removal tool. Use care not to damage the ball joint seals. 6. Remove the cotter pin from the lower arm ball joint and the castle nut. 7. Remove the lower control arm from the knuckle using the ball joint removal tool. 8. Remove the cotter pin from the upper arm ball joint and the castle nut. 9. Remove the upper arm from the knuckle using the ball joint remover. 10. Remove the knuckle and hub by sliding the assembly off of the halfshaft. Any time the hub is removed, the wheel bearing must be replaced with a new one. 11. On 1986-90 Legend, properly support the knuckle and press the hub out of the bearing. 12. On 1991-93 Legend, the hub can be removed with a slide hammer. Clamp the knuckle in a vise and secure the slide hammer to the wheel studs. 13. Remove the splash guard and snaprings. 14. Support the knuckle and press the bearing out towards the wheel side. 15. If the inner bearing race stayed on the hub, use a puller to remove it. To install: 16. Clean all parts and examine for wear. A worn or damaged hub will cause premature bearing failure and should be replaced. 17. When pressing in a new bearing, install the inner snapring first and press the bearing in from the wheel side. Be sure to press only on the outer race or the bearing will be damaged. 18. Install the outer snapring and the splash guard. 19. Properly support the knuckle and press the hub into the bearing. Do not press on the wheel studs or they will press out of the hub. Be sure to support the knuckle by the inner race or the bearing will be damaged. 20. Install the knuckle in the reverse order of removal. Torque the lower ball joint nut to 54 ft. lbs. (75 Nm) and tighten as required to install a new cotter pin. 21. Torque the upper ball joint nut to 32 ft. lbs. (44 Nm) and tighten as required to install a new cotter pin. Torque the tie rod end to 36 ft. lbs. (50 Nm) and tighten as required to install a new cotter pin. 22. With the wheel installed and all 4 wheels on the ground, torque the spindle nut and stake it in place. 1986-90 Legend-180 ft. lbs. (250 Nm) 1991-93 Legend-242 ft. lbs. (335 Nm) Vigor See Figure 4 The front wheel bearing and hub can be removed as an assembly without removing the steering knuckle. Fig. Fig. 4: Exploded view of the front wheel bearing and hub assembly-Vigor 1. Pry the lock tab away from the spindle and loosen the 36mm nut. Slightly loosen the lug nuts. 2. Raise and safely support the vehicle. Remove the front wheel and spindle nut. 3. Remove the bolts retaining the brake caliper and remove the caliper from the knuckle. Do not allow the caliper to hang by the brake hose, support it with a length of wire. 4. Remove the ABS speed sensor from the knuckle. 5. Remove the tie rod from the knuckle using a properly sized ball joint pressing tool. Use care not to damage the joint seals. 6. Remove the cotter pin from the lower arm ball joint and the castle nut. Remove the lower control arm from the knuckle using the ball joint pressing tool. 7. Remove the cotter pin from the upper arm ball joint and the castle nut. Remove the upper arm from the knuckle using the ball joint pressing tool. 8. Remove the knuckle and hub by sliding the assembly off of the halfshaft. 9. To remove the hub from the knuckle, remove the 4 self-locking bolts from the back of the knuckle. Remove the 4 bolts from the hub to remove the brake disc. Any time the hub and bearing are separated, the wheel bearing must be replaced with a new one. 10. The bearing can be pressed off the hub with a hydraulic press. The inner race of the outer row will stay on the hub and can be removed with a bearing puller. To install: 11. Clean all parts and examine for wear. A worn or damaged hub will cause premature bearing failure and should be replaced. 12. When pressing on a new bearing, be sure to press only on the inner race or the bearing will be damaged. 13. Install the brake disc and torque the bolts to 40 ft. lbs. (55 Nm). Do not over torque or the disc will warp. 14. Make sure the splash guard is installed on the knuckle. Install the hub assembly and torque the self-locking bolts to 33 ft. lbs. (45 Nm). Do not over torque or the hub will be distorted. 15. Install the knuckle in the reverse order of removal. Torque the lower ball joint nut to 40 ft. lbs. (54 Nm) and tighten as required to install a new cotter pin. 16. Torque the upper ball joint nut to 32 ft. lbs. (44 Nm) and tighten as required to install a new cotter pin. Torque the tie rod end to 36 ft. lbs. (50 Nm) and tighten as required to install a new cotter pin. 17. With the wheel installed and all 4 wheels on the ground, torque the spindle nut to 180 ft. lbs. (250 Nm) and stake it in place. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Lower Control Arm REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print Legend & Vigor 1. Raise and safely support the vehicle. Remove the front wheels. 2. Remove the lower damper fork bolt. 3. Disconnect the stabilizer bar from the arm. 4. Remove the lower arm ball joint-to-steering knuckle nut. Using a ball joint removal tool, separate the ball joint from the steering knuckle. 5. Disconnect the radius rod from the lower control arm and remove the arm. To install: 6. Reverse the removal procedure. Torque the radius rod-to-control arm bolts to 76 ft. lbs. (105 Nm) and the chassis bolt to 39 ft. lbs. (55 Nm). 7. On 1986-90 Legend, torque ball joint nut to 72 ft. lbs. (100 Nm) and tighten as required to insert a new cotter pin. 8. On 1991-93 Legend, torque the ball joint nut to 54 ft. lbs. (75 Nm) and tighten as required to insert a new cotter pin. 9. On Vigor, torque the lower ball joint nut to 36 ft. lbs. (50 Nm) and tighten as required to install a new cotter pin. Back to Top Acura Coupes and Sedans 1986-1993 Repair Guide Radius Arm REMOVAL & INSTALLATION Print 1986-89 Integra See Figure 1 Fig. Fig. 1: Radius arm mounting-1986-89 Integra 1. Raise and safely support the vehicle. Remove the front wheels. 2. Place a floor jack beneath the lower control arm and remove the ball joint cotter pin/nut. Be sure to place the jack securely beneath the lower control arm at the ball joint. Otherwise, the tension from the torsion bar may cause the arm to suddenly jump away from the steering knuckle as the ball joint is removed. 3. Using a ball joint removal tool or equivalent, remove the ball joint from the steering knuckle. 4. Remove the radius arm locking nuts and the stabilizer locking nut and separate the radius arm from the stabilizer bar. 5. Remove the lower arm bolts and the radius arm by pulling it down and forward. To install: 6. Reverse the removal procedures. Tighten all the rubber bushings and damper parts only after the vehicle is placed back on the ground. Back to Top Acura Cou